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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just went up to chicago for pride, and i have a question. are you guys fans of the new developments in areas like lincoln park and lakeview that look kinda like this?



personally, i liked them. on the L ride to lakeview from downtown, they didn't look too flattering from the sides, but they address the street well IMO, which is the important part. plus, there were some really cool, innovative looking flats being built that i saw. and another question...are these kind of developments all over the city, concentrated on the northside as a whole, or just a lincoln park/lakeview/etc type thing?

btw, i got the pic from realtor.com. it's not mine, so, uh, yeah :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
sorry, but i have one more question. the one pictured was like, 550,000 dollars...are they all that expensive?
 

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Im a fan of them to an extent...I dont want to see them everywhere, but I like the nice mix of old and new.

$550k sounds about right for a high end 2bd/2ba condo in LP
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well, personally, if i had the money, i would totally buy one. i love lakeview, and i love all the shops they have there. there's such a cool vibe there, i loved it when i was there. i'd assume lincoln park has a cool indie vibe, too, but i don't know. i've never been there, just ridden by on the train
 

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muted
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Although you'll see that type of in-fill going up in many areas around the city, Lincoln Park is getting the lion's share. There's a tremendous wave of tear-downs and rebuilds happening there. It can be difficult to walk down a single block and not see at least one residential construction site. I have mixed feelings about this type of housing. On the one hand, the architecture is typically quite bland as shown in the above photo. On the other, these buildings do make an attempt to fit in with the density and style of the surrounding housing stock. Ultimately, it boils down to what's being replaced. I don't mind seeing a decrepit worker's cottage get razed, but I wince whenever it's an old, brick home.

As for your separate comment about Lincoln Park possibly having "a cool indie vibe," it doesn't. It's an extremely yuppified neighborhood. When I first moved there, I still had dreadlocks (this was five years ago), and I definitely got my fair share of stares. Having said that, I still think despite the prevailing yuppie aura, it has many great attributes: proximity to Lake Michigan and downtown, well-connected to transit (bus and el), safe, great parks, and one of the most beautiful in-tact housing stocks anywhere in the city.
 

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Formerly InTheLoop
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Not much of a fan of these. Basically they are architecturally bankrupt. They offer no added benefit visually to the city scape. However, I accept and understand the need to fill in previous gaps, and replace housing that is no longer suitable for either re-hab or practical for modern use.

I am a strong believer that architecture should reflect the period in which it is built. I am not saying that we should be building glass boxes in neighborhoods such as Lincoln Park, but this infill stuff could do a much better job of fitting into the context of the block, and still reflect the time in which it was built. As for the price?... Location, location, location. This isn't Des Moines.
 
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