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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
BORN AGAIN
The area north of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore contains some of the worst slums in the city. It is scheduled to recieve a $1.2 Billion makeover that includes a huge bio-technology park, 1,500 residences, and new retail.

Before that makeover can start, thousands of homes will have to be demolished. The demolition has started and the first bio-technology building is under construction. I took a walk around the area before it completely disappears and I now have an understanding of what the world would be like if they dropped a Neutron bomb and I was the sole survivor. I walked for an hour and passed 2 people.

EVERY HOUSE VISIBLE IS EMPTY AND WILL BE TORN DOWN


THE SAME HERE


THIS BLOCK IS THE NEXT TO GO


THE DRIVING FORCE


THIS LOT WILL CONTAIN THE FIRST STRUCTURE - EXCAVATION HAS COMMENCED


FOUR BLOCKS AWAY FROM THE SLUMS


EVERY MID-RISE BUILDING IN THIS PICTURE IS PART OF HOPKINS. THE AREA TO BE REDONE IS BEHIND AND TO THE LEFT. THIS PICTURE WAS TAKEN FROM DOWNTOWN BALTIMORE LOOKING NORTH EAST


East Baltimore Biotechnology Park: Fact Sheet
The East Baltimore Biotech Park, to be located adjacent to Johns Hopkins Hospital, will encompass 22-acres of an 80-acre redevelopment of East Baltimore. The Biotech Park will be the economic lynchpin of the major redevelopment plan. The mixed use development will include:

Up to 8,000 new jobs: 1/3 for workers holding a high school degree or GED, 1/3 for college-graduates, and 1/3 for post-graduates.

Two million square feet of biotech space over a ten year period, housing 30 to 50 companies, and providing 8,000 jobs (1/3 estimated to go to high school graduates).

Reconfigured, attractive streets and sidewalks to provide marketable addresses to prospective tenants.

Buildings configured to allow for development of small business opportunities to support the many service needs of the residential and commercial community.

Technical training capabilities tailored to the needs of the industry.

Workforce Development - Programs such as the BioTechnical Institute of Maryland, the Chance, and others will train entry-level workforce
Access to teaching facilities, libraries and medical infrastructure.

Large student and patient base.

Incubator programs for cutting edge science.

Networking opportunities with Hopkins' 630 primary researchers and 2000 postdoctoral students and other scientists.

Support services designed specifically for the biotech industry.

The East Baltimore Biotechnology Park is designed to bring together and accommodate the needs of a wide variety of users. The park will provide traditional lab and office space or build-to-suit options for:
Emergent companies
Biological research companies
Small scale manufacturing companies
Incubator programs
Pharmaceutical firms
Companies that provide support services to the biotech industry

East Baltimore Development Partnership
Partnership: The East Baltimore Development is a partnership between Mayor Martin O'Malley and the City of Baltimore, Johns Hopkins, the Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition (HEBCAC), the State of Maryland and the communities of East Baltimore.

Project Cost: $1.2 Billion

Project Boundaries: The boundaries for the 80-acre East Baltimore Development are Broadway, Madison Street, Collington Street and the railroad tracks.

Neighborhood: Today, these neighborhoods are some of the most blighted in Baltimore: 86% vacancy rate in the study area alone. The East Baltimore Development will include up to 1,500 new and rehabilitated residential units as well as new green space to provide a better quality of life for the residents of East Baltimore. The redevelopment will also provide new retail uses in East Baltimore, to build on existing retail opportunities along Monument Street and Broadway. In the below map, the lavender at the bottom represents Johns Hopkins. The bright purple is the new bio-technology park. Each square is a square city block.



JOHNS HOPKINS EXPANDS -AGAIN
Next to this 80 acre project, Johns Hopkins is constructing a $1 Billion hospital. The hospital consists of two 12 story towers. One will be for children and the other for adults. It is a massive project and they are digging the basement level for it now. I ran out of memory space or I would have snapped some photos for you all.

You can use this link to find out more if you are interested!
http://www.forestcityscience.net/news/balt_bus_journ_2004dec24.shtml
 

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Thanks for the pics.

Some people complain about the fact that Hopkins seems to be "taking over Baltimore", but what those idiots fail to realize is that Johns Hopkins University and Hospital are both HUGE for the city of Baltimore.

Charles Village, home to JHU's Homewood campus, is an already stable neighborhood that is getting more services and amenities as a result of Hopkins' influence and involvement in that area. Barns and Noble, Starbucks, another Johns Hopkins FCU branch, an M&T bank branch, Chipotle and Cold Stone Creamery are among the new retail coming to the street level spaces in the new condo buildings at 33rd Street and St. Paul.

The neighborhood surrounding the hospital is in serious need of help. Thankfully, Hopkins is gutting the neighborhood and starting with a blank slate. I can't wait to see what residential and retail offerings will be available when all is said and done.

I think its great that we have two major universities within a couple miles of each other that are in a constent state of competition (with each other top schools/hospitals in the region including UPENN, Georgetown and UVA.) University of Maryland beings construction on a Biotech Park....so does Hopkins. UM improves its residential offerings in the neighborhoods surrounding its campus....so does Hopkins. These are two leading universities trying to best each other for the best and the brightest students. Its a win-win for Baltimore.
 

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those rowhouses look exactly like wilmington's, even in the back with the little yards.

i don't see how any idiot can be opposed to this. what exactly are they opposed to? having a dominant industry that will probably never decline? having higher-paying jobs that bring in talent and a large tax base?
 

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Awesome pics, Wada Guy. How much do you think this view will be altered once the park is complete? The biotech buildings will be six or twelve storeys each?

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Peter, the view from this side will not change much due to the bio-park and housing. The two hospitals, however, will be very visible and they will show up on the right. I love the hospital design with the use of all that colored glass. A rendering was posted about 5 Baltimore development threads ago (sorry, I didn't save it). I really think they represent world class architecture for a world class institution.

What is going to change dramatically is the view of the medical campus from the Amtrak line. The curved right of way goes right through the middle of the project plan above is the Amtrak right of way. From the trains looking south, instead of seeing slums, riders should see a whole new city and campus skyline!

Waj, they are actually keeping the notable buildings, such as schools and churches, and renovating them! An old turn of the centrury school house has already been renovated and is serving as offices for the project. It looks great! I snapped a picture but didn't post it on my web site so I can't display it here.
 

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^Thats even better. Preserving the charecter of the neighborhood is important too. I think what they're doing is great.
 

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nice...I hope the city can figure out how to get this perfected, it seems that most cities in the country are now using Baltimore as a catalyst as far as redevelopment and shaking a bad image.

I always wondered how Baltimore would be without the significant government and federal contracted business in its metro...I mean, I know its close to DC, but sometimes I wonder if they are just too close.
 

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That's quite a boost to the neighborhood. I know there is no shortage of row houses in Baltimore, but if they do keep some of that character in that neighborhood, that would really be great (if they are worth preserving)
 

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The developer, Forest City Science, has done wonders in Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston at UC, UPenn and MIT.

Here are some other renderings just to give you all insight into the scope of this massive undertaking. This area encompasses 88-acres of east Baltimore bounded by Broadway, Collington St., Madison St., and the Amtrak/CSX rail tracks. The area will include new and rehabbed houses, parks/greenspace and retail.

Here's another overhead view of the project:


Here's a rendering of the first commerical building slated for delivery in 2008:


Before these properties were seized by the city through E.D., there was a 56% vacancy rate in this neighborhood. Below are renderings of the current state of the housing stock in that area and what the developer plans for the neighborhood:

Now/Before


After:
 

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I dont mean to put down Baltimore, because it has some great areas(Inner Harbor) but so much of it is full of "slums" and run down neighborhoods. Whenever I go to Greek Town I am disgusted by the terrible condition it is in.

I hope Baltimore renovated areas BESIDES the Inner Harbor, because the city has the potentioal to become great.
 

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Good going. It'll be interesting to see how this turns out - urban renewal gone right, perhaps?
 

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I used to feel the same way

until I went to downtown Dallas, Atlanta and Philly. Baltimore is on par or nicer than all those downtown area's. Locust Point, Canton, Brewers Hill, are
not the Inner Harbor and are really getting nice.


Zorba said:
I dont mean to put down Baltimore, because it has some great areas(Inner Harbor) but so much of it is full of "slums" and run down neighborhoods. Whenever I go to Greek Town I am disgusted by the terrible condition it is in.

I hope Baltimore renovated areas BESIDES the Inner Harbor, because the city has the potentioal to become great.
 

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Finally, Middle-East is getting a boost. Oh, and I do see the immense beauty of this picture you hvae quoted. And, 1 more thing, Locust pt. & Canton ARE inner harbor, sorry. any part of the harbor that is built-up is considered the inner harbor. Dundalk, Cherry Hill, Brooklyn Park aren't inner harbor.
 

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It's hard to overestimate the importance of Hopkins to Baltimore. The Homewood campus is an anchor for Charles Village. The mammoth medical campus, which looks like the city has a second downtown, is the engine behind thousands of jobs and many millions in money coming into the city and now it is revitalizing and entire swath of the city. The new medical center near Greektown is attracting Federal and commercial development. When Peabody was bleeding money, Hopkins bought them, has cranked money into that campus and put music students into Stafford Hotel building, which mainly used to house welfarers and resulted in constant daylight drug deals right out on Charles St. In my part of town, they bought the campus of the moribund St Paul Cos and that now continues as a beautiful piece of Mt Washington property, generating revenue for local businesses in the neighborhood.
 

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Zorba said:
I dont mean to put down Baltimore, because it has some great areas(Inner Harbor) but so much of it is full of "slums" and run down neighborhoods. Whenever I go to Greek Town I am disgusted by the terrible condition it is in.

I hope Baltimore renovated areas BESIDES the Inner Harbor, because the city has the potentioal to become great.
Before you make such a sweeping judgement, you should explore more. There are slums in Baltimore but there are lots of interesting neighborhoods, rehab areas and many areas that don't need rehabbing because they never have been deteriorated.
 

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That's too bad in a way. For the most part those houses don't look too dilapidated. I guess I've just seen a lot worse. They don't build those anymore, so when they're gone they're gone for good. Oh well, all for the best. I wish the best of luck on this project.
 
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