SkyscraperCity Forum banner
1 - 20 of 134 Posts

·
Disco and drugs trade
Joined
·
15,945 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Not at all deco



I was trying to find a picture of the very 1930s Kent Street Swimming baths, and came across that, it was the Grand Theatre on Corporation St, and I just thought I'd share the misery....

Meanwhile:



Bournville Carillion, whatever that is, nice early 20thcentry detailing, nore arts and crafts than Art Deco, I suppose.



Kings Norton, (Cotterrage) firestation. And err.. my old school...

Just look at the sandstone (?) detail! 1911, rhythm in architecture, again probably not true art deco.

Unlike



which is about as deco as you can get. :drool:

http://www.theelectric.co.uk/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Hi Stephen & SimLim - back in the mid-1990s BCC produced a series of leaflet guides on architecture through the decades in Birmingham City Centre. Their 'Discovering Deco' guide included the following (then-surviving) buildings (some repeating yours above):

Municipal Bank (TSB), Broad Street (1931)
Lee Longlands, Broad Street (1931+)
Hall of Memory, Centenary Sq (early 1920s)
Baskerville House, Centenary Sq (1935-39)
New Oxford House (1934), Neville House (1934), Cavendish House (1937), Legal & General Building (1931) (all on Waterloo Street)
Sun Insurance Office (1927+) & Burne Jones House (1930) (both on Bennetts Hill)
Somerset House (1936), Temple Street
Lombard House (1934) & Colonial Mutual Life (CML) Assurance (1939) (both on Great Charles Street)
Odeon Cinema (1937) (principally the tower above the canopy), New Street
Waterstones (formerly Times Furnishing) (1938), High Street

So, quite a bit which we often just walk straight past! (& plenty more in the suburbs)
I'll try to upload some pics asap.

PS Some Art Deco 'types' were in fact built in the 1950s eg. Grosvenor House (the zig-zag one) on New Street is 1953, & the Britannia Hotel, New Street is 1955. (According to BCCs 'Finding the Fifties' leaflet.)
 

·
Ow'amya ?
Joined
·
512 Posts
cookoid_0 said:
I thought art deco was from the 1930's not earlier?

"The period termed "art deco" manifested itself roughly between the two world wars, or 1920 to 1939. Many actually stretch this period back to 1900 and even as far as the late 1950's, but work of this time is generally considered to be more of an influence to the Art Deco style, or having been influenced by the style. As with many other art movements, even work of today is still being influenced by the past."

Source:http://www.retropolis.net/history.html

As mentioned before: The Birmingham Odeon

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Also, the Three Magpies boozer in Hall Green (and the Baldwins too, I think). The Magpies is grade 2 listed.



Growing up in Hall Green remember going to the 'outdoor' (ah, there's a word I like to use to confuse cockneys) at the Maggies to buy sweets.

Is this how 'outdoor' came to mean 'off license'? As a side door to a pub where they sold booze to take out, I mean?
 

·
Ow'amya ?
Joined
·
512 Posts
pauliewalnuts said:
Also, the Three Magpies boozer in Hall Green (and the Baldwins too, I think). The Magpies is grade 2 listed.


I've been looking for a photo of the Magpies, a lovely building that i have known since childhood as my gran lived across the road from it.

Here is a picture of Kennilworth court that Bileduct took a while back. It does'nt look very art deco from the outside but the inside is very of the period. You can see from the interiors that these apartments were built for the wealthy with lots of wood and stone all finished to a very high standard.

There are "tradesman" entrances at the rear of the building with each apartment having service access directly to the kitchen doors. The original terms of sale state that the only " non-white " residents allowed were servants. :bash:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Just found this:

"The Three Magpies in Shirley Road and its sister pub the Baldwin in Baldwins Lane were designed by Birmingham born Edwin Reynolds. The architects were Birmingham based Wood & Kendrick. A profile of the front elevation of the two pubs placed side by side would reveal another part of history as the design was based on The Queen Mary cruise liner launched by Cunard White Star on September 26th 1934, undertaking her maiden voyage on May 27th 1936.

Fortunately, The Three Magpies and the Baldwin have stood the test of time a little better as The Queen Mary was decommissioned on October 5th 1971. After a recent refurbishment the Three Magpies has become The Maggies. "
 

·
Second Citizen
Joined
·
16,929 Posts
Stephen Robinson said:
Is that the Acocks Green Odeon? The pics of this when it was just opened are amazing :) Such a cool building, and was it not the first Odeon?

As for the synagogue on Sheepcote Street Stephen - I don't think it will be missed. Boring frontage straight on to the street, no stained glass windows, plan brick sides and back. Nothing redeeming in my eyes. And it took years of me walking past it to realise it was a synagogue! :lol:
 

·
Disco and drugs trade
Joined
·
15,945 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Biosonic said:
Is that the Acocks Green Odeon? The pics of this when it was just opened are amazing :) Such a cool building, and was it not the first Odeon?

As for the synagogue on Sheepcote Street Stephen - I don't think it will be missed. Boring frontage straight on to the street, no stained glass windows, plan brick sides and back. Nothing redeeming in my eyes. And it took years of me walking past it to realise it was a synagogue! :lol:
Kingstanding, apparently. Never been to Kingstanding in my life. But I have heard Hoochie-Coochie man From Kingstanding.

You're probably right about the Synagogue, some nice curves on the Frontage, but can't say I ever noticed it myself.

Remind me what they're builing there now? Flats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
958 Posts
[/QUOTE] PS Some Art Deco 'types' were in fact built in the 1950s eg. Grosvenor House (the zig-zag one) on New Street is 1953, & the Britannia Hotel, New Street is 1955. (According to BCCs 'Finding the Fifties' leaflet.)[/QUOTE]


The Britannia Hotel dates from just before the war. Construction commenced in 1938 as a department store for Marshall and Snelgrove and had not been completed when the war broke out and work was suspended. I think it sustained war damage and was finally completed in 1955 to the original design.
 
1 - 20 of 134 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top