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two points - domestic cricket in auckland generally has an average crowd of 50 or so. Moving it to Kaitaia wouldn't have much of an impact on gate revenue

Victoria Park its intended to be an open space It is actually usually fairly well used by strollers dog walkers kids playing etc Stuff you dont see from viaduct

The tankfarm renders look good but that site is too valuable to be a sports stadium. When all the talk was of a waterfront stadium I thought where the bus garage is would have been ideal
 

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No place for Auckland on Olympic 'map' – economist​
A leading economist expects the Olympics will reach a "tipping point" before the 2020 Games because the event spending model cannot be sustained. Massey University's Dr Sam Richardson told NBR ONLINE a major shift in the approach to funding the event is needed because the cost to host cities is just too great. And he is not so sure Auckland has the infrastructure to handle the Olympics, as was suggested last year. Dr Richardson suggests greater use of private investment would reduce the burden on taxpayers and lead to more efficiently-run event. When London won its bid to host this year's Games in 2005 it was meant to cost about $NZ4.6 billion.

In February this year, the UK Parliament's public accounts select committee warned "the costs to the public purse of delivering the Games" were already heading for about $NZ21 billion. Every host city wants to claim the "best Olympics ever", but at some point there has to be a cap on the amount of money spent, he says. "Everyone who's sensible about it is asking, 'When will the madness finish?'" Oxford University researchers are projecting these games will be the most costly so far. They say comparing the totals of all Olympic Games over the past 50 years, London will rank alongside Beijing, Barcelona and Montreal as the most "expensive in history".

'Politically acceptable' costs
Researcher Allison Stewart says: "The figures that are in the public domain are unlikely to be the full final cost of the Games, but represent 'politically acceptable' costs." A casual observer would be forgiven for wondering why, when it is clear the initial budgets will probably be blown several times over, cities are so keen to put their hands up to host the Olympics? University of Alberta economics professor Brad R. Humphreys crunched the numbers in 2008 and found there are few economic benefits in terms of GDP growth. He examined the Seoul, Montreal, Athens, Sydney and Barcelona Games, finding in each case GDP growth dipped significantly the year after. Prof Humphreys also said the 2004 Athens and 2008 Beijing Games both had initial projected costs of $US1.6 billion. They ended up costing $US16 billion and $US40 billion respectively. Montreal, which hosted the 1976 event, only just paid off its Olympic debt in 2006. Dr Richardson says that despite this, cities still want to host the games because it puts them "on the map". "It's almost like in America where if you have a baseball or football team you are a 'major league city'. "Many world cities would see hosting an Olympics as 'we're major league now'."

He says many host cities, such as Athens and Beijing, built tremendous new facilities for the Games but they now many are all but abandoned. To explore how this could be changed, and how the Games could become an economically sustainable event, it is useful to go back to the last two American cities to host them. The Los Angeles 1984 Olympics is hailed as one of the great success stories of the modern Games, having achieved a surplus of more than $US200 million. Rather than make taxpayers bear the burden of the cost, the organisers raised $US150 million in sponsorships and built few new venues. In Atlanta in 1996 new facilities were built but they were well-utilised afterwards. For example, the dormitories used for the Olympic Village became student housing for Georgia State University, and the newly-built Centennial Olympic Stadium was converted into Turner Field and has been the home of the Atlanta Braves major league baseball team since 1997.

Dr Richardson says this is the type of thinking that needs to become commonplace for cities hosting Olympic Games. "There must be more private involvement. "You don't see the private involvement in things like facilities, but if it's a sound business case then there's no reason why private business couldn't run a successful Olympic Games. "You could argue the scope of the Games is much larger than it was in 1984, but if it makes good economic sense, you have to look at what extent the private sector should be involved."

Don't do proper cost-benefit analyses
Dr Richardson says part of the reason Olympic budgets almost always balloon is that host cities have historically failed to conduct proper cost-benefit analyses. Normally all that is done beforehand is an economic impact analysis, which estimates the level of economic activity associated with the event and its impact on the economy. "While I don't have a problem with those, I don't think it actually answers the question: 'Is this a good investment?'" He says a cost-benefit analysis, which calculates and compares the financial basis for hosting the Games is better at determining the virtue of the investment. If this was done, cities would see they need to peg back their spending, and the Games would be run more modestly and efficiently. This would be a major departure from the apparent desire for cities to host the "biggest and best" Games, but the change must come within the next two Olympic Games, he says.

So if the Olympics became more cost-effective, could smaller cities such as Auckland ever hope to become a host city? International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge thought so when he was in Auckland during the Rugby World Cup last year. He said that the time: "It is a possibility. Finland organised the Olympic Games with a population of 5 million. Norway has hosted a Winter Olympics Games ... with the same population as New Zealand." However, they haven't gone to a country of New Zealand's size since Helsinki in 1952. Dr Richardson says to examine whether Auckland could feasibly host an Olympics, you only have to look at what happened after the city hosted the 1990 Commonwealth Games. "There are only two or three facilities which were built or upgraded that are still in use. "You have Mt Smart stadium, which is coming under all sorts of questions about what they're going to do with it in the future."

What bout NBR's 'Greek Solution'?
An NBR ONLINE opinion piece recently suggested a solution to the "expensive Olympics" problem: Make Greece a centre for world sports. It would host all the world's major sporting events, not only saving other countries the extraordinary cost of running events, but also rejuvenating the Greek economy.

Dr Richardson was asked to analyse the concept and explain whether or not it would work. "An interesting piece, but ultimately a flawed concept. One reason is because the arguments outside of those economic and financial also matter to those who decide whether or not to host the Games. "I'd have my doubts as to whether a Greece-based 'world stadium' would actually 'regenerate' Greece. "Hosting major events and building facilities hasn't worked for many cities due to competition between cities that drive the costs of these things up. "While reduced competition might appear on the surface to lower costs, the actual costs may well even be higher (think of Greece as a monopoly on event hosting – they can charge whatever hosting fee they like being the only host). "Their incentive is to charge a high fee – it is their wellbeing at stake under such a plan. "If the intention was to lower the fee to make the event hosted in Greece less costly, what incentive does Greece have to keep their facilities as state of the art? "They may come under pressure to constantly upgrade/rebuild as conditions of hosting events, which may be even more costly.

"If it did turn out to be profitable, we'll see a return to what we are seeing now. "It is like any business in which profits are made – there will be attempts to appropriate that profit from other cities/countries promising lower costs/fees (or higher revenue guarantees) to international bodies while offering more lavish facilities at greater costs to themselves. "It is a vicious cycle, and an incredibly perplexing one! "Ultimately, the key to sanity lies with the international body that gains the most from these events – bodies like the IOC, FIFA, IRB, etc. "These are the bodies that retain much of the revenues accruing to the event. "In the case of the IRB and the RWC, the only thing the host country gets is ticket sales to offset the costs of hosting the tournament. "I understand the IOC does share some of the cost of the event, which is sensible. Whether it is enough is another debate. "The international bodies that sanction and award these events need to champion fiscal responsibility as part of the conditions of the event. "Cities and countries also really need to ask the hard questions of themselves – what do we really stand to gain by hosting these events?"
 

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Albany gets $17.8m swimming centre​
After 20 years of waiting, Albany will finally get a community swimming centre - with preliminary work on the site of the Northern Recreation Centre underway. The Auckland Council has set aside $17.8 million over the next three years for the project. The Upper Harbour Local Board has agreed to invest $571,000 over the next year for preliminary work and a geotechnical survey is underway at the proposed site at North Harbour Stadium. Upper Harbour Local Board chairwoman Margaret Miles said the community had been ''asking for a swimming centre in the Albany area for 20 years, and the local board is relieved that this project will finally proceed". "We have advocated for this project since the beginning of our term as Upper Harbour Local Board members, and we are very pleased that funding has been included in the Long-term Plan to make it happen." Mayor Len Brown said the centre would become a ''shining example of what can be achieved in the new Auckland and I am thrilled for the residents of the Upper Harbour and surrounding areas who will get so much use from the facility." He also noted that the pool, when open, will be free for those aged 16 and under- under a proposal recently adopted by the council.
 
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Fan Trail back for Bledisloe Cup

Auckland is bringing back the Fan Trail when the city hosts the Bledisloe Cup Test at Eden Park later this month. Mayor Len Brown says the Fan Trail became one of Auckland’s “must do” activities during Rugby World Cup 2011 (RWC 2011) and he is delighted to see it reactivated. “The Fan Trail defied the sceptics and became one of the biggest hits of Rugby World Cup in Auckland,” Len Brown says. “Visitors and locals loved the Fan Trail and more than 120,000 fans walked to Eden Park for matches.” Len Brown says the Fan Trail has the potential to become a signature feature of Auckland major events at Eden Park and elsewhere and will help build on Auckland’s growing reputation as a major events destination.

“Add to that the fact that it eases the pressure on match day traffic and transport as well as reducing the environmental impact of major events and it’s a winner all round,” he says. “If you walked the Fan Trail during RWC 2011, you will want to do it again. If you didn’t, this is your chance to see why RWC 2011 fans couldn’t get enough of it.” Len Brown says August 25 will be a very special day for Auckland with a Cure Kids Bledisloe Cup Fanzone at the Cloud followed by the Bledisloe Cup Fan Trail and the All Blacks taking on the Wallabies at Eden Park in the city’s biggest sporting event of the year. Come rain or shine on August 25, the 4.3km walking route will start in the city at Queen Elizabeth Square (opposite Britomart Station) from 4pm onwards.

The Fan Trail will be run by Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development, who developed and delivered the initiative for RWC 2011. This year’s version will feature entertainment for all ages including the likes of lighting installations, stilt walkers, jugglers, DJs, burlesque dancers, cultural dancers and flash mobs. There will also be numerous opportunities to stop along the route and enjoy food and beverages at existing outlets and temporary Fan Trail sites. The route will be identical to that used successfully during RWC 2011, starting at Queen Elizabeth Square and passing through some of Auckland’s signature locations – Queen St, Aotea Square, Myers Park, St Kevin’s Arcade, Karangahape Rd, Great North Rd, Bond St, Sandringham Rd and Wairepo Swamp Walk – and ending at Eden Park. The Fan Trail can be walked in under an hour, but fans are encouraged to take their time and allow up to two hours to enjoy all the activities along the way.

Visit www.aucklandnz.com for further information.
 

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Auckland & Christchurch to host All Whites​
Auckland and Christchurch will host the All Whites' first two home matches of their 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign. The matches, part of the third stage of Oceania qualifying, will be played against the Solomon Islands at North Harbour Stadium on September 11 and against Tahiti at Christchurch's AMI Stadium on October 16. The latter match will be the first the All Whites have played in the South Island since a 1-0 win over Malaysia at QEII Park in 2006. The venue for New Zealand's third home qualifier, on March 22, 2013, is yet to be decided.

New Zealand Football chief executive Grant McKavanagh was pleased to be able to acknowledge the strong influence of Canterbury players in past and present All Whites sides. "It's exciting to be able to bring the national team back to Christchurch given what the region has given to the All Whites," McKavanagh said in a statement. New Zealand's first match in the Oceania qualifying campaign is away to New Caledonia in Noumea on September 7. The winners of the qualifying series progress to a home and away playoff against the fourth-placed qualifiers from the North and Central America region in November 2013 for a place at the World Cup finals in Brazil a year later.
 
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Three Kings United claim Knockout Cup​


Auckland's Three Kings United claimed the Women's Knockout Cup for the fourth time in their history with a hard fought 2-0 win over Massey University at a windswept Newtown Park in Wellington.

After experiencing a gut-wrenching 5-4 extra time loss in the final time two years ago Three Kings United coach Andy Clay said his was impressed by the way a young side missing a few regulars stepped up. "It's been some years since Three Kings won the Knockout Cup and the last trophy we won was the Northern Premier League five years ago," Clay said. "We've come close and we had that heartbreaking loss in the final two years ago and amazingly we only have two players today left from that line up. We've got five players at the U-20 Women's World Cup and senior players have moved on so while that advancement is a measure of success for the club, it's also great to win trophies."

Three Kings United 2 (Marty Puketapu 12', 90')
Massey University 0


Central United win Chatham Cup​


Central United have enhanced their reputation as one of the great clubs in the history of the Chatham Cup with a 6-1 victory over Lower Hutt City in the 85th final at Wellington's Newtown Park.

Celebrating their 50th anniversary, Central now join fellow Aucklanders Eastern Suburbs as five-time winners with only University Mount Wellington, with seven titles, and six-time winners North Shore United and Christchurch United above them on the honours board. Also moving up the leader board was Central striker Paul Urlovic who has been in all five Cup winning teams for Central. Only All Whites legend Steve Summer can boast more Chatham Cup winners' medals with six.

"The stats show that Central United are up there now," captain Ivan Vicelich said. "For us to win five times is outstanding over a long period. The first one was in 1997 and to win the trophy again in our 50th year makes it even more special. To win a final by so many is rare. It was tough but the boys put a lot of effort in and came away with a win." Central coach Chris Zoricich hailed the win as a massive achievement for the club. "We're only a small club so to get five Chatham Cups in 15 years is fantastic," Zoricich said. The club really needed a trophy in its 50th year to celebrate that so I'm honoured that this group of players could bring it back to Kiwitea Street."

Central United 6 (Emiliano Tade 19', David Mulligan 23', Daniel Koprivcic 45+2', 71', Ivan Vicelich 60', Jason Hicks 86')
Lower Hutt City 1 (Hamish Price 90+2')


http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/football/7551269/Three-Kings-United-claim-Knockout-Cup and http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/football/7551240/Central-United-win-Chatham-Cup-final
 

· If seagulls could talk...
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I like the idea of a cricket venue on the top of Wynyard, even though I don't like cricket.

Crappy 3d concept unfortunately...half finished?

The entire place would need to integrate perfectly into the overall master plan for the area, including all the cafes, marinas, jetties and other good stuff we expect to see there.

Then it could be well used for other events such as X Games, athletics, concerts, festivals, etc.
 
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Rate Payers asked to Pay for White Water Rafting Project

Hard on the heels of a recent contentious decision by an Auckland Controlled Organisation to spend nearly $11 million on the V8 Supercars another CCO, Regional Facilities Auckland, is seeking $30 from the Auckland Council to fund a white water rafting course next to the Pacific Events Centre in Manukau. In addition to funding from the rate payer the CCO is seeking $10 million of tax payer funding through the Ministry of Economic Development. Howick Councillor Dick Quax expressed surprise at the controversial proposal has been resurrected. “The old Manukau City Council voted this project down by a large majority before the amalgamation in 2010 on the basis that it is hugely expensive to build and operate and well beyond what the mandate of the Council.”

“If there is a demand for white water rafting in Auckland then the private sector will undoubtedly provide such a facility. I just don’t see the private sector putting up their money but it seems that the long suffering rate payer will be asked to dig deep for what can only be described a luxury we can ill afford in recessionary times.” “The people of Manukau have already been extraordinarily generous to the Trust that runs the Pacific Event Centre providing it with money, land, a loan guarantee and ongoing grants to pay for local events that cannot afford the high rents the Trust charge to use the facility. To date the amount is over $50 million. It appears that the RFA see an opportunity for the entire region to pay for a project completely rejected by both the people of Manukau and the Manukau Council.”
 

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I like the idea of a cricket venue on the top of Wynyard, even though I don't like cricket.

Crappy 3d concept unfortunately...half finished?

The entire place would need to integrate perfectly into the overall master plan for the area, including all the cafes, marinas, jetties and other good stuff we expect to see there.

Then it could be well used for other events such as X Games, athletics, concerts, festivals, etc.
Exactly! - build this damn thing - for the sake of cricket not just in Auckland, but in New Zealand!
intergrate it with the aesthetic of the viaduct/wynyard quarter - maybe even leave a few tanks there where the "blank space"/"plain paved area"/concourse is illustrated and convert into quirky retail spaces or something.
also, those complaining of the render...duh! - its a RENDER..meaning they dont include every little detail - just the conceptualisation. I have no doubt that if it gets built, it will be a success. I for one would love to see test cricket in Auckland, with that gorgeous CBD backdrop and so would the tens of thousands of aussies, saffa's, Sub-continentals and Brits who call Auckland home too!
 
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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Exactly! - build this damn thing - for the sake of cricket not just in Auckland, but in New Zealand!
intergrate it with the aesthetic of the viaduct/wynyard quarter - maybe even leave a few tanks there where the "blank space"/"plain paved area"/concourse is illustrated and convert into quirky retail spaces or something.
also, those complaining of the render...duh! - its a RENDER..meaning they dont include every little detail - just the conceptualisation. I have no doubt that if it gets built, it will be a success. I for one would love to see test cricket in Auckland, with that gorgeous CBD backdrop and so would the tens of thousands of aussies, saffa's, Sub-continentals and Brits who call Auckland home too!
No denying that AKL needs a great cricket facility but I for one don't want this on the waterfront unless there is some way of guaranteeing that it can be used 24/7 365 days of the year. The masterplan for the new waterfront envisages an iconic structure for this site but I think that it favours a cultural venue such as an Art Gallery or Museum.
 

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No denying that AKL needs a great cricket facility but I for one don't want this on the waterfront unless there is some way of guaranteeing that it can be used 24/7 365 days of the year. The masterplan for the new waterfront envisages an iconic structure for this site but I think that it favours a cultural venue such as an Art Gallery or Museum.
Will you settle for being available to the public 360 days of the year? As I understand it the iconic structure will be somewhat further south about half way between Silo Park and the Point. The point has always been planned as a park and I think getting a large open area suitable for concerts, festivals etc, with a stage would be a great idea.
 
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Will you settle for being available to the public 360 days of the year? As I understand it the iconic structure will be somewhat further south about half way between Silo Park and the Point. The point has always been planned as a park and I think getting a large open area suitable for concerts, festivals etc, with a stage would be a great idea.
I love the design so yes but it has to offer something other than just a stadium. Retail/galleries at promenade level etc.
 

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I love the design so yes but it has to offer something other than just a stadium. Retail/galleries at promenade level etc.
The plan with that is to provide a large grassed area with an embankment and a small stand that would double as a sound stage for concerts etc. I'm not sure about retail at promenade level as it would be a significant distance across the rest of the park to the stand. I guess you could have a promenade with shops and restaurants etc going all the way from the built area of Wynyard Quarter to the point.
 

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As I understand it the iconic structure will be somewhat further south about half way between Silo Park and the Point. The point has always been planned as a park and I think getting a large open area suitable for concerts, festivals etc, with a stage would be a great idea.
Sounds interesting. My only criticism of the Sydney Opera House is that its practically surrounded by concrete (and then OK, water...). Any iconic strucrure at Wynyard that has a decent sized edging of grass would look awesome.
 

· Kiwi in London
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A test venue cant be open to the public that many days a year. Playing surfaces are maintained to absolute perfection so during the summer months the whole ground (or maybe just the pitch block) would be shut off from the general public.
 
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