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I just realized I'm completely ignorant of this: what do Australian cities look like? Are they very similar to American cities, with wide streets and little public transportation and all that, or do they follow a more European model? Or are they in between? When were most Australian cities founded/built up?
 

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Brief summary from what i know.
Sydney is the oldest city of Australia, settled in 1788 as the first settlement of the colony of New South Wales. Sydney is the most populous city of Australia, and looks to stay that way for some while, as it is expanding at roughly 50'000ish people/year last time i checked. It has about 5 million in its greater metro area, but about 4.3 in the city. Sydney is not a planned city. It was originally a walking city, settled around the Rocks area of Sydney harbour. From there it expanded outwards, with the harbour as a boundary. Mid 1800's, the rail age came, and the city expanded out upon rail corridors. There are many old suburbs still surrounding these lines with very distinct character, again however, it was not an extremely planned thing. Trams were the main method of transport for many years around ~1900's, with an extensive system. However this was torn up around the 60's. There is a recent move to perhaps re-install some however. The harbour was finally bridged in the early 1930's by the famous sydney harbour bridge. Prior to this, ferries serviced North Sydney.

The city now is continually changing. It now is a very very large city, sapce wise. Following WWII, the "Australian Dream" was born, that is mainly of a quater acre block with enough for a front and back yard. Suburbia hence is highly evident. It was mostly organic at first, but now, huge planned communites exist in the western regions of the city. These areas primarily rely on cars for transport, however rail does service, and there is a growing emphasis on expanding these facilities to cater for the population growth and to reduce waste. The inner city now is also undergoing massive consolodation and revitalisation. Suburbs such as Pyrmont, which is directly adjacent to the CBD is prime real-estate, however was purely industrial throughout the cities history until relatively recently. Now it is serviced by light rail and is a growing suburb of typically terrace homes dating back many many years. Urban renewal is bringing these areas back to life, with new character developing as a result.

The city is also highly multi-cultural. WWII was brought right to our doorstep, with Darwin (north coast Australia) being bombed many dozen times. It became apparent that if seriously attacked, Australia would struggle to defend itself. Hence, the immigration minister (forgot name) after WWII proposed "populate or perish", ie, boost immigration rates hugely, despite massive racism left over from the british colonial times influence. It wasnt until about 1970 that "multiculturalism" was the approach taken to immigration, and it still circulates today. Sydney (and most Australian cities) are then hugely multicultural. Sydney particularly has massive Italian, Chinese, Lebanese, Vietnamese and Greek (Melbourne has 2nd biggest in world i do believe) populations living in concentrated pockets throughout the city. Many suburbs are hugely influence by this factor and have developed very unique styles to match this. THis is the case for many many nationalities, these are just the main ones that come to mind.

:) hope that gives you an idea. SOrry for the wall of text.
As stated, please drop into Ozscrapers, we'd love to have you in there for a chat!
 

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^ demenjo, this may sound a bit pedantic, but Sydney does not have 4.3million in it's city and 5million in it's metro.

Sydney's city proper has 175,000 people (although as Australia never uses the city proper statistic, this is hardly known)

The 4.2 (probably 4.3million now) population IS the wider metropolitan area known as the Sydney Statistical Division, and covers 12,000km²~ including all of the Blue Mountains going west to Lithgow, Gosford and the entire Central Coast until it hits Newcastle's suburbs and the full Cumberland Plain.

A 5million+ area would have to also include the entire Illawarra Statistical Division as well as Newcastle's Statistical Division and is certainly not Sydney's metropolitan area but a tri city area over 200km long.

You can find all this information easily and for free under www.abs.gov.au complete with maps, geograhical areas spreadsheets and everything you may need.
 

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I've got a question. Has NSW always been known as such? Why Wales? As a convict settlement, is that not kinda insulting to Wales? It's like naming Alcatraz, Queens.
 

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I think Australian cities look pretty much like american ones. Although the grid is not as dominant as in america. And you clearly see the wealth difference between America and Australia.
 

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Australian cities have similarities in their planning. A lot of the very early city centres such as Sydney went mostly unplanned, but the later cities were well organised such as Melbourne and Adelaide. There are a lot of suburbs that largely planned like American suburbs (many middle and outer suburbs) and some like European (many inner suburbs).

Adelaide street level:
(AtD)
KWS and Grenfell:


Pirie Street:


Rail lines into Adelaide Terminal:


Melbourne street level:
(The Collector)
Melbourne Uni:


(uewepuep)
Collins Street at Collins Place(??)




Sydney street level:
(Fabian)
Australia Square:


Bridge Street looking west:


Pitt Street Mall:


Brisbane street level:
(JayT)
Treasury Casino:


South Bank:


Sorry, I could not find any Perth street level pics.
 

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Actually, I think Australian cities looks more green (surrounding the Central Business District or CBD area) and cleaner overall than American cities of the same size. Regarding wide streets, it depends from city to city (e.g. Melbourne and Adelaide has grid like wide streets and more European feel, whereas Sydney and Brisbane streets are more curvy and narrower as they weren't planned to be cities of its size today). Public transport wise, I guess its in between those of US and Europe cities. We don't have enough density to warrant subways unless its around the CBD area, although trains, trams and buses covers most suburbs so cars aren't essential but a bonus since we spraw pretty much like US cities but with lesser freeways.

Pic from Aussie Steve of Melbourne



btw, Melbourne (population 3.6 million), was settled in 1835 and is Australia's 2nd largest city.

-G'day-
 

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More Bris (Im from bris!!! gimme a break lol)
Adelaide & Albert St


Queen St/Edward St


Anzac Square
 

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Justme - i am aware the city proper is only very small, but by "city" i was referring to the continual metro building, essentially, which contains about 4.3 roughly if my memory serves me correctly. The 5 million population is for the greater sydney metropolitan area, which does actually encompass Wollongong & Newcaste. This is an accepter boundary as the areas are heavily economically interlinked. This is what i was trying to convey, but yeah i do understand what you're on about.
 

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samsonyuen - New South Wales is named such due to Captain Cook's (i think it was) observations when exploring. From his point of view, it reminded him alot of Wales in England. The "New" and the "South" parts speak for themselves.
 

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About WWII, there was a line accross Australia, called the Brisbane line, if Australia were ever invaded (by land) The government had a plan, make a line form Brisbane to perth and anything below that was Australian, anything above was desert, so the japs could die trying to get to the citys.


Umm Melbourne was lucky to get huge wide streets and small lanes. the wide streets make trams good in the city. Melb is on a Mile by half mile grid, divided into city blocks.

Melboune was settled as a Village, not as a Penal colony.
Melbourne has the most greeks outside of greece, and also has the largest amount of Victorian era buildings outside of London.
 

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demanjo said:
Justme - i am aware the city proper is only very small, but by "city" i was referring to the continual metro building, essentially, which contains about 4.3 roughly if my memory serves me correctly. The 5 million population is for the greater sydney metropolitan area, which does actually encompass Wollongong & Newcaste. This is an accepter boundary as the areas are heavily economically interlinked. This is what i was trying to convey, but yeah i do understand what you're on about.
Please show me external links, academic, government etc which consider Newcastle and Wollongong as part of Greater Sydney. These three cities could form a megalopolis, which is the connecting of two or more seperate metropolitan area's that adjoin each other, such as joining Boston, New York, Washington DC and Philadelphia. And in this case, the Newcastle, Sydney, Wollongong connections could be seen as a small megalopolis, but in no way are these three completely seperate metropolitan area's considered "Greater Sydney".

Australia is lucky to have the ABS with excellent and easy to find statistical information for their cities and demographics, and the ABS never combine the three cities as a single entity. There is no reason to do so, the distances from the bottom of the Illawarra region to the top of the Newcastle region is vast, from Kiama to Newcastle it is 274km, from the center of Wollongong to Newcastle 234km. This is NOT a metropolitan area.

There is however, a chance That not to far from now in the future, Wollongong, with increased commuter traffic to Sydney, would eventually be joined to the Sydney Statistical Division, or become a dependent “statistical division” to Sydney’s. But not Newcastle, as the distances between Wollongong and Sydney are far shorter than that of Newcastle. However, that time has not yet come, and even if it was the case, the population would not increase to anything above 4.6- 4.7million, still well short of 5million.

Wollongong to Sydney - 84km
Newcastle to Sydney - 160km
 

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http://www.metrostrategy.nsw.gov.au/dev/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=33&languageId=1&contentId=305
"The Greater Metropolitan Region stretches from Kiama in the south to Port Stephens in the north. The urban areas are framed by the Tasman Sea and the Great Dividing Range
It contains Sydney, the Central Coast, the Lower Hunter and the Illawarra."


Argue with them about it. I realise they are different entities, but the statistics say this.
Population = 4.9 million.. ok sorry i was off by a bit, but this will crak 5 million very quickly.
 

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demanjo said:
http://www.metrostrategy.nsw.gov.au/dev/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=33&languageId=1&contentId=305
"The Greater Metropolitan Region stretches from Kiama in the south to Port Stephens in the north. The urban areas are framed by the Tasman Sea and the Great Dividing Range
It contains Sydney, the Central Coast, the Lower Hunter and the Illawarra."


Argue with them about it. I realise they are different entities, but the statistics say this.
Population = 4.9 million.. ok sorry i was off by a bit, but this will crak 5 million very quickly.
:lol: I won't debate that site because it's correct. But it is NOT SYDNEY'S Metropolitan area. It's the Megalopolis I mentioned earlier, the joining of seperate but adjoining metropolitan area's. They even say on the site they are seperate...

Quote: "These regions are unique and want to remain so. "

It is not the metropolitan area of Sydney, but the "Metropolitan regions" of NSW with Sydney at the center. The distances between Kiama and Pt Stephens are nearly 400km apart! If you try to claim that the Sydney metropolitan area is 400km long, you will not only be the only person trying to claim such rubbish, but you will also find people laughing at you here.

Newcastle is not part of Sydney's metro, it never was, it never has been considered as such, and will never be in your lifetime.

For your own sake, I suggest you don't try to push this debate much further. There is absolutely no point in trying to persuade forumers here that Sydney's metropolitan area is 400km long.

The site you gave are the combined metropolitan area's of the central NSW coast with Sydney at the center, it is not Sydney's metropolitan area.

end of story.
 

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I've been in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra, Cairns, and I think they're American/Canadian in that they're new. I think the similarity between New Zealand, South African too, can be attributed to the British founding/settling heritage, and the newness of the countries. That can be seen in the relative similar styles of architecture and planning too. Victorian houses in Melbourne? Same thing in San Francisco and Toronto!
 
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