Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 78 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I POSTED THIS THREAD A FEW MINUTES AGO, BUT IT DIDN'T SHOW UP, SO I'LL TRY AGAIN....

New York is our nation's largest city and Washington its capital. I'd like to look at the other three major cities in the northeast megalopolis/northeast corridor: Baltimore, Boston, and Philadelphia. I also want to focus on how all five of these cities relate to each other

First, I'd like to say that these are three great cities, excellent examples of American urbanism.

Next, I'd like to share some observations, totally my own, and ask those on the east coast (and others) who are more knowledgeable about the following than I am whether or not I'm on to something...or am I way off base:

1. Boston and Philadelphia are probably the two richest major cities in their relationship to the colonial era and, in particular, the events that created the Revolutionary War, the war itself, and the new nation era. Boston has, IMHO, cashed in on its history more than Philadelphia. If that is true, I wonder if Philadelphia's larger size is a factor in keeping Boston more historic. Boston, despite similiar metro popuations, has been able to maintain a higher profile than Philadelphia....where an argument could easily be made that both cities should be at the same level.

2. Both Boston and Baltimore have major waterfronts. Both have made these waterfronts inviting. Yet Baltimore has "cashed in" on its waterfront more than Boston, even though Boston is a more major US city. Baltimore seems to have a more aggressive, Avis-style "we try harder" attitude in promoting itself over places like Boston. Actually over Philadelphia, too. Baltimore may be for self-promotion to the northeast what Atlanta is in the southeast.

3. Boston has an advantage over Philadelphia and Baltimore because it is the furthest afield of the 5 major cities and thus has been more able to to establish its own identity. Another advantage is that only Boston of the 5 cities is New England, not Mid-Atlantic, and Boston is the undisputed capital of New England. Philadelphia has been hurt by proximity to NYC and Baltimore by its proximity to DC; Bosotn is less affected by such factors due to its location.

4. The inter-relationship between Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington is undoubtdly the most interestng of any such regional groups of cities. It is fascinating to see how these major cities play off each other.

5. Of all cities outside the northeast, I believe that my city of Chicago relates best to the northeast metropolises due to Chicago was the one "western" city that most parraleled the growth of industry, immigration, the development of cultural institutions, the development of true American urbanism, etc. Chicago's strong connection to the northeast by canal/rivers/lakes and later by rail cemented a special relationship between the Windy City and the northeast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
For number 1, I think NYC is the richest city in the country. Ever walk through the city? There are a TON of limos. I went to a Mets game and we were in the upper deck and we could see the highway. I must have seen 100 limos pass by on the highway. NYC also has the richest sports teams in the country. The YANKEES, METS, RANGERS. Also, there are a lot of billionaires in NYC. My Dad knows a guy who's a billionaire in NYC. But Boston and Philly are pretty wealthy I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
edsg25 said:
I POSTED THIS THREAD A FEW MINUTES AGO, BUT IT DIDN'T SHOW UP, SO I'LL TRY AGAIN....

New York is our nation's largest city and Washington its capital. I'd like to look at the other three major cities in the northeast megalopolis/northeast corridor: Baltimore, Boston, and Philadelphia. I also want to focus on how all five of these cities relate to each other

First, I'd like to say that these are three great cities, excellent examples of American urbanism.

Next, I'd like to share some observations, totally my own, and ask those on the east coast (and others) who are more knowledgeable about the following than I am whether or not I'm on to something...or am I way off base:

1. Boston and Philadelphia are probably the two richest major cities in their relationship to the colonial era and, in particular, the events that created the Revolutionary War, the war itself, and the new nation era. Boston has, IMHO, cashed in on its history more than Philadelphia. If that is true, I wonder if Philadelphia's larger size is a factor in keeping Boston more historic. Boston, despite similiar metro popuations, has been able to maintain a higher profile than Philadelphia....where an argument could easily be made that both cities should be at the same level.

2. Both Boston and Baltimore have major waterfronts. Both have made these waterfronts inviting. Yet Baltimore has "cashed in" on its waterfront more than Boston, even though Boston is a more major US city. Baltimore seems to have a more aggressive, Avis-style "we try harder" attitude in promoting itself over places like Boston. Actually over Philadelphia, too. Baltimore may be for self-promotion to the northeast what Atlanta is in the southeast.

3. Boston has an advantage over Philadelphia and Baltimore because it is the furthest afield of the 5 major cities and thus has been more able to to establish its own identity. Another advantage is that only Boston of the 5 cities is New England, not Mid-Atlantic, and Boston is the undisputed capital of New England. Philadelphia has been hurt by proximity to NYC and Baltimore by its proximity to DC; Bosotn is less affected by such factors due to its location.

4. The inter-relationship between Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington is undoubtdly the most interestng of any such regional groups of cities. It is fascinating to see how these major cities play off each other.

5. Of all cities outside the northeast, I believe that my city of Chicago relates best to the northeast metropolises due to Chicago was the one "western" city that most parraleled the growth of industry, immigration, the development of cultural institutions, the development of true American urbanism, etc. Chicago's strong connection to the northeast by canal/rivers/lakes and later by rail cemented a special relationship between the Windy City and the northeast.
I think that is a rather perceptive analysis.

Another point I would add is that Boston was never as dependent on heavy industry as Philadelphia and Baltimore. Thus the social and racial demographics of Boston ended up being quite different from the other two, which are more similar to each other. This has had a big effect on the course of their respective developments and histories, especially in the last 50 years.
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
It's an interesting post, edsg25. I find it an interesting collection of cities as well, and their relations are quite unique as well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ron C said:
I think that is a rather perceptive analysis.

Another point I would add is that Boston was never as dependent on heavy industry as Philadelphia and Baltimore. Thus the social and racial demographics of Boston ended up being quite different from the other two, which are more similar to each other. This has had a big effect on the course of their respective developments and histories, especially in the last 50 years.
Ron, good point...it's like Boston replaced industry with education.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
mid-town said:
For number 1, I think NYC is the richest city in the country. Ever walk through the city? There are a TON of limos. I went to a Mets game and we were in the upper deck and we could see the highway. I must have seen 100 limos pass by on the highway. NYC also has the richest sports teams in the country. The YANKEES, METS, RANGERS. Also, there are a lot of billionaires in NYC. My Dad knows a guy who's a billionaire in NYC. But Boston and Philly are pretty wealthy I think.

Um I dont think thats the kind of "richness" edsg25 was talking about:

edsg25 said:
Boston and Philadelphia are probably the two richest major cities in their relationship to the colonial era and, in particular, the events that created the Revolutionary War, the war itself, and the new nation era.
But with that being said, I think NYC also played a huge role in the colonial era, though it gets overshadowed by all the growth the city has experienced since. Boston and Philly have better "preserved" their history.

edsg, I think you partially answered your own questions for why Boston has "cashed in" on its history more. Philadelphia is much closer to NYC and therefore gets overshadowed. Also, Boston has a whole region, New England, to dominate. On the other hand, just 40 miles northwest of Philadelphia, focus begins to shift to NYC.

About the waterfront, I must add that Boston undertook a major project to clean up its harbor. The Boston Harbor was once the dirtiest in the nation, they used to dump sewage straight into it. Now sewage is sent miles out to an island where it is cleaned in a state of the art facility. The filtered effluent is then released even further out into the Atlantic. The Boston Harbor cleanup has been very succesful, and the waters are now good enough to swim and fish in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Also on the boston waterfront, there are currently 2 large plots of land which were recently aquired, and are now under prelimianary development for residential and commerical buildings. Unfortunatly, what we have see so far in the south boston waterfront is nothing special at all.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
285 Posts
Everyone in america knows when you say Philadelphia you must be talking about the Constitution, Food or American History. It's one of Philadelphia's main tourism ID's. Boston's ID is Education, Harvard the oldest school in this nation. Ivy league Penn, Princeton, Harvard, etc.. have been competing for years. Waterfront Philadelphia's ports have been bustling since the 17th century and competing with Boston, Baltimore, and NYC. Boston was the #1 major player with the colonies in the 17 century, then #1 NYC early 1700's then #1 Philadelphia 1750's at the same time during this growth they always stood in the top three. Philadelphia was the founding place for this great nation and the architect of this nation. The first bank, Mint, Public School, University, U.S. Capitol, Liberty Bell, etc.. Also it was the U.S. Financial capital until late 1800's where it then went to NYC. During this phase chicago was being created in the early 1800's by st. louis, Pittsburgh, the north east u.s. through PRR, baltimore and ohio rr, erie canal, illinois Michigan canal. The midwest is connected to the N.E. because the N.E. fueled it's growth and was it's growth. Even the skyscraper was created by a Fairhaven, Mass. born fellow looking for work and found it in the Chicago Fire. He was responsible for creating the Home Insurance Building (william Jenney)

Which one is better etc.. of course is a matter of opinion. Boston, NYC and Philly are america's TITAN Cities, there has been no other city in the U.S. that has and still is influencing the U.S. as these three cities. From Colonial times to 2006. Even though we've been through this before I guess it must be reiterated.

Ports of Call
http://www.bts.gov/publications/sta...rtation_statistics_2005/html/table_03_06.html


30th street station
It is the second-most active railway station in the United States
http://www.gophila.com/P/30th_Street_Station_/238.html

Penn Railroad
http://www.parailways.com/parailways/history.jsp

Main Line of Public Works (Penn Canal)
http://www.explorepahistory.com/hmarker.php?markerId=676

Philadelphia
http://www.ushistory.org/tour/index.html
 

·
Tastemaker Extraordinare
Joined
·
308 Posts
JBOB said:
Which one is better etc.. of course is a matter of opinion. Boston, NYC and Philly are america's TITAN Cities, there has been no other city in the U.S. that has and still is influencing the U.S. as these three cities. From Colonial times to 2006. Even though we've been through this before I guess it must be reiterated.
]
Better is opinion, but since Chicago, LA, SF, Seattle, and all the others didn't exist in colonial times there isn't really any other three cities to choose.

But Philly doesn't influence the US at all these days and Boston only some.

The three US cities today are NY, LA and SF
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
EtherealMist said:
But with that being said, I think NYC also played a huge role in the colonial era, though it gets overshadowed by all the growth the city has experienced since. Boston and Philly have better "preserved" their history.
Im in full agreement, Ehtereal. New York, perhaps like no other city in the world was built for commerce and trade and ultimately perhaps more so than any other city, not to be a part of any one place as much as of the world. As a result, commerce guided NY tore down so much of its past...and not always in a negative sense. NYC is about working at a time, perhaps in a sense Vegas-before-Vegas: if commerce required buildings to be torn down for necessary replacement, sobeit (don't get me wrong...I realize NYC is more interested in its past now that it was a time when Penn State could be torn down or Grand Central brutalized). Still, NYC constatntly reinvents itself.

The other major difference between NYC and both Philly and Boston is that the later two's colonial roots were completely British and thus so attached to the 13 colonies experience where NY went from Dutch to British (and eventually American) without really belonging to any of them.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
285 Posts
SILVERLAKE said:
But Philly doesn't influence the US at all these days and Boston only some.

Now one could debate that the 100k people that visit philadelphia annually for American History from around the country on field trips aren't influencing anyone. Or the Colleges of Temple with campuses in london, Japan, China, etc.. Or 2 out of every five doctors in the U.S. went to a Philadelphia School but they are not influencing anyone either. The list could go on but everyone is entitled to their opinion.


These alumni from University of Pennsylvania in West philadelphia. I guess have not influenced anyone either.

Noted alumni
[edit]
Nobel laureates
Christian B. Anfinsen (MS. 1939): Nobel laureate ( Chemistry, 1972)
Michael S. Brown: (BS 1962, MD, 1966, Honorary Sc.D. 1986) Nobel laureate ( Physiology or Medicine, 1985)
Gerald Edelman (MD 1954, Honorary Sc.D. 1973) Nobel laureate (Physiology or Medicine 1972)
Stanley Prusiner: (A.B. 1964, M.D. 1968) Nobel laureate (Physiology or Medicine, 1997); discovered prions (the agent in mad cow disease)
Ahmed Zewail (Ph.D. 1974, Honorary Sc.D. 1997) Nobel laureate (Chemistry, 1999)
[edit]

Academia
Britton Chance: Scientist and Olympic gold medallist who made great contributions to spectrometry and biochemistry/biophysics research
Noam Chomsky: Linguist and activist.
Gordon Clark: Philosopher and Christian theologian.
William Holmes Crosby, Jr. Considered by many to be one of the founding fathers of modern hematology.
Paul R. Ehrlich: Zoologist
Lawrence Lessig: Copyright activist, law professor at Stanford University.
Charles P. Kindleberger: economist, economic historian.
Hilary Putnam: Walter Beverly Pearson Professor of Modern Mathematics and Mathematical Logic at Harvard University
Judith Rodin: First woman president of an Ivy League university (University of Pennsylvania)
[edit]


Arts, media, and entertainment
Charles Addams: Creator, The Addams Family; he is said to have modeled the Addams Family mansion after Penn's College Hall
Ti-Grace Atkinson: author, feminist
Elizabeth Banks - Actress, best known as kinky sex freak in The 40-Year-Old Virgin
Eric Bazilian: Singer, songwriter, leader of The Hooters
Andrea Brody: Co-host of U.S. television's George Michael Sports Machine
Jack Barry: television producer and host, 1950s-1984.
Candice Bergen: Actress, best known as TV's Murphy Brown
Ron Brown: NBC international affairs correspondent
Alfred Butts: Inventor of Scrabble
Joe Klein: columnist and political analyst for Time Magazine.
Bruce Dern: Actor
The Disco Biscuits: Sam Altman, Marc Brownstein, Jon Gutwillig and Aron Magner all attended. Only Altman graduated.
Ray Evans: Songwriter
William Fawcett: Actor
Richard Garfield: Inventor of the popular trading card game Magic: The Gathering.
Stephen Glass: Former reporter for The New Republic, author of The Fabulist
Leonard Goldberg: Former Chairman of 20th Century Fox/TV and Movie Producer
Zane Grey: author of Western novels
H.G. Bissinger: Author of Friday Night Lights and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist.
Louis Kahn: Noted architect, works include Jatiyo Sangsad Bhaban National Assembly Building, Bangladesh.
Aaron Karo: Popular college humorist who details Penn life in books and on the CollegeHumor website.
Duncan Kenworthy: Producer, Four Weddings and a Funeral, and Notting Hill
Andrea Kremer: ESPN sports correspondent
William Harold Lee: architect
John Legend: (birth name John Stephens) Rhythm and blues singer/songwriter
Jay Livingston:Songwriter
John D. MacDonald: author of many novels, including the Travis McGee series
Andrea Mitchell: NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent
IM Pei: Famous modernist architect (attended but did not graduate)
Jim Perry: U.S. and Canadian television host
Ezra Pound: 20th century Modernist poet and promoter of various writers and schools of literature (attended for two years before transferring to Hamilton College)
Maury Povich: Talk-show host
Harold Prince: Famous Broadway Producer with works including West Side Story and Phantom of the Opera
Paul Provenza: Actor and comedian and director of The Aristocrats
Alan Rachins: actor (L.A. Law and Dharma and Greg)
David Raksin: Composer
Melissa Rivers (Birth name: Melissa Rosenberg), Actress and daughter of comedian Joan Rivers
Martin Cruz Smith: Author of Gorky Park
[[I.F. Stone]: Prominent journalist and commentator from the 40s through the 60s.
Bobby Troup: Actor, Songwriter
John Edgar Wideman: Author, Rhodes Scholar
William Carlos Williams: Poet
Rick Yune: Actor
Chip Zien: Actor
[edit]


Athletics
Chuck Bednarik: Philadelphia Eagles Linebacker
Bert Bell: Former National Football League Commissioner from 1946-1959, who took the league to unprecedented heights
Jim Finn: National Football League fullback
Doug Glanville: Major League Baseball Outfielder
John Heisman: The Heisman Trophy is named after him
Alvin Kraenzlein: four-time Olympic champion
Rob Milanese: Arena Football League wide receiver;school's all-time leading receiver
David Montgomery: Part-owner, President, and CEO of the Philadelphia Phillies
Walter O'Malley: Owner and chief executive of Brooklyn Dodgers.
Vernon Stouffer: Former owner of Cleveland Indians.
John Taylor: First African-American to win an Olympic Gold Medal
Syed Mohammed Hadi: Olympic athlete
[edit]


Business
For a more comprehensive list of notable alumni in the business world, see *Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Walter Annenberg: billionaire publisher, philanthropist, former U.S Ambassador to the United Kingdom, awarded the Medal of Freedom He was given the rank of Knight Commander (the second-highest rank in the Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II.
Gregory Bentley: CEO of Bentley Systems
Nicholas Biddle: President of the Second Bank of the United States
Henry Bloch: Co-founder, H&R Block
Richard Bloch: Co-founder, H&R Block
Len Bosack: Co-founder, Cisco Systems (Internet routers company)
Warren Buffett: CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, investor, second richest man in the world (attended for two years before transferring to the University of Nebraska)
Donny Deutsch: Deustch Inc.
Eugene du Pont: the first head of modern day DuPont.
Richard Fisher: Fisher Brothers Construction, New York
Jay S. Fishman: Chairman and CEO of St. Paul Travelers
Joel Greenblatt: hedge fund manager and author
Hussam Hamadeh: Founder, Vault.com
Charles Heimbold: U.S. Ambassador to Sweden, former CEO of Bristol Myers Squibb Corporation
Jon Huntsman, Sr.:Billionaire, founder of the Huntsman Corporation
Leonard Lauder: Co-founder of Estée Lauder; billionaire investor
Douglas Lenat: Founder of artificial intelligence company Cycorp
Gerald Levin (Penn Law): former CEO AOL Time Warner
Peter Lynch: Investor, vice-chairman of Fidelity Investments
Michael Milken: Trader/financier
William S. Paley: Founder, CBS Corporation
Bruce Pasternack: President and CEO of the Special Olympics International; formerly Senior Vice President of Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc.
Ronald Perelman: Billionaire investor
Michael Tiemann: Co-founder of Cygnus Solutions (a GNU software company), now CTO of Red Hat
Laurence Tisch: Former CEO of CBS
Donald Trump: Billionaire real estate mogul, investor, and financier
Roy Vagelos: Former CEO of Merck Pharmaceuticals
Steve Wynn: Chairman and CEO Wynn Resorts, Limited. Former Chairman and CEO Mirage Resorts, Inc.; responsible for the renaissance of Las Vegas
[edit]


Government, law, and politics
Sadie Tanner Alexander: First African-American woman to receive a Ph.D in the United States; first African-American woman to graduate from Penn Law; first black woman to be admitted to Pennsylvania Bar; Civil Rights activist; appointed to the Civil Rights Commission by President Harry S. Truman.
Gloria Allred: Lawyer, Feminist
Nnamdi Azikiwe: First President of Nigeria-actually graduated from Lincoln Universityin Pennsylvania
Ernesto P. Balladares: President of Panama, 1994-1999
William J. Brennan: U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Jasper Yeates Brinton: Former U.S. Ambassador to Egypt, architect of the Egyptian court system and Justice of the Egyptian Supreme Court
Joni L. Charatan: Associate General Counsel to The Dreyfus Corporation
Richard Clarke: Author and National Counter-Terrorism Director under the presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.
Richard S. Dennison, Jr.: Presidential Speechwriter, Lawyer, Politician from New Jersey.
Chaka Fattah: U.S. Congressman representing Philadelphia.
Harold E. Ford, Jr.: U.S. Representative from Tennessee, candidate for house minority leader, 2002
Thomas S. Gates: Secretary of Defense, 1959-1961, Secretary of the Navy, 1957-1959
Benjamin Gilman: U.S Representative from New York, 1973-2003
Henry Dilworth Gilpin: Former U.S Attorney General
Wilson Goode: Former Mayor of Philadelphia
Oscar Goodman: Mayor of Las Vegas and Attorney.
William Henry Harrison (class of 1791): 9th President of the United States
Ira Einhorn: 1960s imprisoned murderer of Holly Maddux
Jon Huntsman, Jr.: Governor of Utah, former US Trade Ambassador
Martin Luther King, Jr. (1949-1950): The primary figure in the civil rights movement of the 1960s (took graduate courses, no degree).
C. Everett Koop (internship): Surgeon General of the United States, 1981-1989.
John F. Lehman, former United States Secretary of the Navy.
Andrew A. Biros, former George School Football Captain.
James Mason (senator): Influential U.S. Senator from Virginia in the early 19th century.
Thomas McKean: Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Pennsylvania delegate to the Continental Congress
Gouverneur Morris: New York delegate to the Continental Congress, 1778-1779; U.S. Senator from New York, 1800-1803
Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg: Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, 1789-1791, 1793-1795. Pennsylvania delegate to the Continental Congress, 1779-1780; Pennsylvania representative to the US Congress, 1789-1797
Kwame Nkrumah: First President of Ghana
Alassane D. Ouattara: Prime Minister of Côte d'Ivoire, 1990-1993
Paulo T. A. Paiva: Former Minister of Labor and Economic Planning of Brazil, 1994-1999
George Wharton Pepper: U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, chronicler of the Senate
Pedro Ramos: Managing Director for the City of Philadelphia, former City Solicitor for the City of Philadelphia, former Vice President of The University of Pennsylvania
Ed Rendell: Governor of Pennsylvania , former Mayor of Philadelphia and former Democratic National Committee Chairman
Owen J. Roberts: United States Supreme Court Justice
George Sharswood: Former Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court
Arlen Specter: U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, former Philadelphia District Attorney
Cesar Virata: Prime Minister of the Philippines, 1981-1986
Robert John Walker: Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-1849
[edit]


Notable faculty
Dr. Christian B. Anfinsen: Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry
Dr. E. Digby Baltzell: Scholar and Author; Creator of the acronym WASP
Dr. Baruch Blumberg: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Raymond Davis, Jr.: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Gerald Edelman: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Ragnar Granit: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Haldan K. Hartline: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Robert Hofstadter: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Lawrence Klein: Nobel Prize winner in Economics
Dr. Simon Kuznets: Nobel Prize winner in Economics
Dr. Alan MacDiarmid: Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry
Dr. J. Robert Schrieffer: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Steven Hahn - Pulitzer Prize winner, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of History
Dr. Sol Goodgal - Microbiology professor - Major contributor to the study of genetic transformation in bacteria
Dr. Edward Doheny - Geology professor - Developed and heads Masters of Science in Applied Geosciences (MSAG) program
Babu Suthar
Matt Blaze - Associate Professor - Computer Science Department
Robert F. Boruch - University Trustee Chair Professor, Graduate School of Education
John Bowker (adjunct professor)
Eugenio Calabi - Thomas A. Scott Professor of Mathematics Emeritus - Mathematics Department
Dr. Arthur Caplan - Bioethicist
Britton Chance
Roger Allen- Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Thomas Childers - Department of History
Dr. Edward Peters- Henry Charles Lea Professor of History- Department of History
Dr. Peter Conn - Andrea Mitchell Term Professor of English
Francis X. Diebold - W.P. Carey Term Professor in Economics - Economics Department
John DiIulio - Department of Political Science
Dr. Michael Eric Dyson - Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Religious Studies
Warren Ewens
Martha J. Farah - Professor of Psychology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
Dr. Peter J. Freyd - Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Stephen Gale - Terrorism expert-Dept. of Political Science.
Ronald Granieri- Department of History
David Harbater - E. Otis Kendall Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Kathleen Hall Jamieson - University of Pennsylvania author and media analyst.
Dr. Aravind Joshi - Henry Salvatori Professor of Computer and Cognitive Science - Computer Science Department
Dr. Richard Kadison - Gustave C. Kuemmerle Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Dr. Donald F. Kettl - Stanley I. Sheerr Endowed Term Professor in the Social Sciences, Professor of Political Science & Director of the Fels Institute of Government
Louis Kahn: Noted architect, works include Jatiyo Sangsad Bhaban National Assembly Building, Bangladesh.
Dr. Bruce Kuklick - Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History - History Department
Dr. William Labov - Professor of Linguistics
Dr. Elihu Katz - Distinguished Trustee Professor of Communication
Dr. Mitch Marcus - RCA Professor of Artificial Intelligence - Computer Science Department
Dr. E. Ann Matter - Professor of Religious Studies
Dr. Walter McDougall - Department of History
Dr. Jeremy McInerney (Associate Professor, Graduate and Undergraduate Advisor) - Classical Studies Department
Dr. Burt Ovrut -Professor of Physics & one of the pioneers of superstring theory
Dr. Fernando Pereira - Andrew and Debra Rachleff Professor of Computer Science - Computer Science Department
Dr. Robert A. Rescorla Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor in Psychology and co-creator of the Rescorla-Wagner model
Dr. Ralph Rosen - Classical Studies Department Chair
Dr. Martin E. P. Seligman - Robert A. Fox Leadership Professor of Psychology - Psychology Department
Dr. Jeremy Siegel - Department of Finance
Dr. Rogers Smith - Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science - Political Science Department
Dr. Peter Stallybrass - Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities - English Department
Dr. Wendy Steiner - Richard L. Fisher Professor of English, Founding Director of the Penn Humanities Forum
Dr. Peter T. Struck - Classical Studies Department
Dr. Steve Tinney - Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi - Sociology Department
Dr. Samuel H. Preston - Fredrick J. Warren Professor of Demography
Dr. Lightner Witmer - Inventor of the term "Clinical Psychology" and the founder of the First Psychological Clinic (1896)
Retrieved
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
edsg25 said:
I realize NYC is more interested in its past now that it was a time when Penn State could be torn down or Grand Central brutalized). Still, NYC constatntly reinvents itself.
i appologize to joe pa and nittany lions everrywhere. obviously i meant penn station.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
NYC's been around since before the Colonial Era. NYC was founded in 1624. The Colonial Era was in the 1700's. NYC was founded around the Middle Ages time period. Now that's old.
 

·
Tastemaker Extraordinare
Joined
·
308 Posts
Philly is influential in field trips, like, whatever....How many people go to Paris to see Notre Dame? Millions.

And 2 out of 5 doctors were trained in Philadeliphia??????????? Let's see, even a dummy like me can quickly figure out that that is total BS!!!!!!!!!!!!

Google says there are 125 medical schools in the country...http://www.aamc.org/medicalschools.htm. And a total of 4 are in philadlephia (U Penn, Jefferson, Drexel, and Temple). So like 3-4 % of the medical schools train 40% of the doctors. What a bullshit stat.



JBOB said:
Now one could debate that the 100k people that visit philadelphia annually for American History from around the country on field trips aren't influencing anyone. Or the Colleges of Temple with campuses in london, Japan, China, etc.. Or 2 out of every five doctors in the U.S. went to a Philadelphia School but they are not influencing anyone either. The list could go on but everyone is entitled to their opinion.


These alumni from University of Pennsylvania in West philadelphia. I guess have not influenced anyone either.

Noted alumni
[edit]
Nobel laureates
Christian B. Anfinsen (MS. 1939): Nobel laureate ( Chemistry, 1972)
Michael S. Brown: (BS 1962, MD, 1966, Honorary Sc.D. 1986) Nobel laureate ( Physiology or Medicine, 1985)
Gerald Edelman (MD 1954, Honorary Sc.D. 1973) Nobel laureate (Physiology or Medicine 1972)
Stanley Prusiner: (A.B. 1964, M.D. 1968) Nobel laureate (Physiology or Medicine, 1997); discovered prions (the agent in mad cow disease)
Ahmed Zewail (Ph.D. 1974, Honorary Sc.D. 1997) Nobel laureate (Chemistry, 1999)
[edit]

Academia
Britton Chance: Scientist and Olympic gold medallist who made great contributions to spectrometry and biochemistry/biophysics research
Noam Chomsky: Linguist and activist.
Gordon Clark: Philosopher and Christian theologian.
William Holmes Crosby, Jr. Considered by many to be one of the founding fathers of modern hematology.
Paul R. Ehrlich: Zoologist
Lawrence Lessig: Copyright activist, law professor at Stanford University.
Charles P. Kindleberger: economist, economic historian.
Hilary Putnam: Walter Beverly Pearson Professor of Modern Mathematics and Mathematical Logic at Harvard University
Judith Rodin: First woman president of an Ivy League university (University of Pennsylvania)
[edit]


Arts, media, and entertainment
Charles Addams: Creator, The Addams Family; he is said to have modeled the Addams Family mansion after Penn's College Hall
Ti-Grace Atkinson: author, feminist
Elizabeth Banks - Actress, best known as kinky sex freak in The 40-Year-Old Virgin
Eric Bazilian: Singer, songwriter, leader of The Hooters
Andrea Brody: Co-host of U.S. television's George Michael Sports Machine
Jack Barry: television producer and host, 1950s-1984.
Candice Bergen: Actress, best known as TV's Murphy Brown
Ron Brown: NBC international affairs correspondent
Alfred Butts: Inventor of Scrabble
Joe Klein: columnist and political analyst for Time Magazine.
Bruce Dern: Actor
The Disco Biscuits: Sam Altman, Marc Brownstein, Jon Gutwillig and Aron Magner all attended. Only Altman graduated.
Ray Evans: Songwriter
William Fawcett: Actor
Richard Garfield: Inventor of the popular trading card game Magic: The Gathering.
Stephen Glass: Former reporter for The New Republic, author of The Fabulist
Leonard Goldberg: Former Chairman of 20th Century Fox/TV and Movie Producer
Zane Grey: author of Western novels
H.G. Bissinger: Author of Friday Night Lights and Pulitzer Prize winning journalist.
Louis Kahn: Noted architect, works include Jatiyo Sangsad Bhaban National Assembly Building, Bangladesh.
Aaron Karo: Popular college humorist who details Penn life in books and on the CollegeHumor website.
Duncan Kenworthy: Producer, Four Weddings and a Funeral, and Notting Hill
Andrea Kremer: ESPN sports correspondent
William Harold Lee: architect
John Legend: (birth name John Stephens) Rhythm and blues singer/songwriter
Jay Livingston:Songwriter
John D. MacDonald: author of many novels, including the Travis McGee series
Andrea Mitchell: NBC Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent
IM Pei: Famous modernist architect (attended but did not graduate)
Jim Perry: U.S. and Canadian television host
Ezra Pound: 20th century Modernist poet and promoter of various writers and schools of literature (attended for two years before transferring to Hamilton College)
Maury Povich: Talk-show host
Harold Prince: Famous Broadway Producer with works including West Side Story and Phantom of the Opera
Paul Provenza: Actor and comedian and director of The Aristocrats
Alan Rachins: actor (L.A. Law and Dharma and Greg)
David Raksin: Composer
Melissa Rivers (Birth name: Melissa Rosenberg), Actress and daughter of comedian Joan Rivers
Martin Cruz Smith: Author of Gorky Park
[[I.F. Stone]: Prominent journalist and commentator from the 40s through the 60s.
Bobby Troup: Actor, Songwriter
John Edgar Wideman: Author, Rhodes Scholar
William Carlos Williams: Poet
Rick Yune: Actor
Chip Zien: Actor
[edit]


Athletics
Chuck Bednarik: Philadelphia Eagles Linebacker
Bert Bell: Former National Football League Commissioner from 1946-1959, who took the league to unprecedented heights
Jim Finn: National Football League fullback
Doug Glanville: Major League Baseball Outfielder
John Heisman: The Heisman Trophy is named after him
Alvin Kraenzlein: four-time Olympic champion
Rob Milanese: Arena Football League wide receiver;school's all-time leading receiver
David Montgomery: Part-owner, President, and CEO of the Philadelphia Phillies
Walter O'Malley: Owner and chief executive of Brooklyn Dodgers.
Vernon Stouffer: Former owner of Cleveland Indians.
John Taylor: First African-American to win an Olympic Gold Medal
Syed Mohammed Hadi: Olympic athlete
[edit]


Business
For a more comprehensive list of notable alumni in the business world, see *Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

Walter Annenberg: billionaire publisher, philanthropist, former U.S Ambassador to the United Kingdom, awarded the Medal of Freedom He was given the rank of Knight Commander (the second-highest rank in the Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II.
Gregory Bentley: CEO of Bentley Systems
Nicholas Biddle: President of the Second Bank of the United States
Henry Bloch: Co-founder, H&R Block
Richard Bloch: Co-founder, H&R Block
Len Bosack: Co-founder, Cisco Systems (Internet routers company)
Warren Buffett: CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, investor, second richest man in the world (attended for two years before transferring to the University of Nebraska)
Donny Deutsch: Deustch Inc.
Eugene du Pont: the first head of modern day DuPont.
Richard Fisher: Fisher Brothers Construction, New York
Jay S. Fishman: Chairman and CEO of St. Paul Travelers
Joel Greenblatt: hedge fund manager and author
Hussam Hamadeh: Founder, Vault.com
Charles Heimbold: U.S. Ambassador to Sweden, former CEO of Bristol Myers Squibb Corporation
Jon Huntsman, Sr.:Billionaire, founder of the Huntsman Corporation
Leonard Lauder: Co-founder of Estée Lauder; billionaire investor
Douglas Lenat: Founder of artificial intelligence company Cycorp
Gerald Levin (Penn Law): former CEO AOL Time Warner
Peter Lynch: Investor, vice-chairman of Fidelity Investments
Michael Milken: Trader/financier
William S. Paley: Founder, CBS Corporation
Bruce Pasternack: President and CEO of the Special Olympics International; formerly Senior Vice President of Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc.
Ronald Perelman: Billionaire investor
Michael Tiemann: Co-founder of Cygnus Solutions (a GNU software company), now CTO of Red Hat
Laurence Tisch: Former CEO of CBS
Donald Trump: Billionaire real estate mogul, investor, and financier
Roy Vagelos: Former CEO of Merck Pharmaceuticals
Steve Wynn: Chairman and CEO Wynn Resorts, Limited. Former Chairman and CEO Mirage Resorts, Inc.; responsible for the renaissance of Las Vegas
[edit]


Government, law, and politics
Sadie Tanner Alexander: First African-American woman to receive a Ph.D in the United States; first African-American woman to graduate from Penn Law; first black woman to be admitted to Pennsylvania Bar; Civil Rights activist; appointed to the Civil Rights Commission by President Harry S. Truman.
Gloria Allred: Lawyer, Feminist
Nnamdi Azikiwe: First President of Nigeria-actually graduated from Lincoln Universityin Pennsylvania
Ernesto P. Balladares: President of Panama, 1994-1999
William J. Brennan: U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Jasper Yeates Brinton: Former U.S. Ambassador to Egypt, architect of the Egyptian court system and Justice of the Egyptian Supreme Court
Joni L. Charatan: Associate General Counsel to The Dreyfus Corporation
Richard Clarke: Author and National Counter-Terrorism Director under the presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.
Richard S. Dennison, Jr.: Presidential Speechwriter, Lawyer, Politician from New Jersey.
Chaka Fattah: U.S. Congressman representing Philadelphia.
Harold E. Ford, Jr.: U.S. Representative from Tennessee, candidate for house minority leader, 2002
Thomas S. Gates: Secretary of Defense, 1959-1961, Secretary of the Navy, 1957-1959
Benjamin Gilman: U.S Representative from New York, 1973-2003
Henry Dilworth Gilpin: Former U.S Attorney General
Wilson Goode: Former Mayor of Philadelphia
Oscar Goodman: Mayor of Las Vegas and Attorney.
William Henry Harrison (class of 1791): 9th President of the United States
Ira Einhorn: 1960s imprisoned murderer of Holly Maddux
Jon Huntsman, Jr.: Governor of Utah, former US Trade Ambassador
Martin Luther King, Jr. (1949-1950): The primary figure in the civil rights movement of the 1960s (took graduate courses, no degree).
C. Everett Koop (internship): Surgeon General of the United States, 1981-1989.
John F. Lehman, former United States Secretary of the Navy.
Andrew A. Biros, former George School Football Captain.
James Mason (senator): Influential U.S. Senator from Virginia in the early 19th century.
Thomas McKean: Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Pennsylvania delegate to the Continental Congress
Gouverneur Morris: New York delegate to the Continental Congress, 1778-1779; U.S. Senator from New York, 1800-1803
Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg: Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, 1789-1791, 1793-1795. Pennsylvania delegate to the Continental Congress, 1779-1780; Pennsylvania representative to the US Congress, 1789-1797
Kwame Nkrumah: First President of Ghana
Alassane D. Ouattara: Prime Minister of Côte d'Ivoire, 1990-1993
Paulo T. A. Paiva: Former Minister of Labor and Economic Planning of Brazil, 1994-1999
George Wharton Pepper: U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, chronicler of the Senate
Pedro Ramos: Managing Director for the City of Philadelphia, former City Solicitor for the City of Philadelphia, former Vice President of The University of Pennsylvania
Ed Rendell: Governor of Pennsylvania , former Mayor of Philadelphia and former Democratic National Committee Chairman
Owen J. Roberts: United States Supreme Court Justice
George Sharswood: Former Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court
Arlen Specter: U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania, former Philadelphia District Attorney
Cesar Virata: Prime Minister of the Philippines, 1981-1986
Robert John Walker: Secretary of the Treasury, 1845-1849
[edit]


Notable faculty
Dr. Christian B. Anfinsen: Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry
Dr. E. Digby Baltzell: Scholar and Author; Creator of the acronym WASP
Dr. Baruch Blumberg: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Raymond Davis, Jr.: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Gerald Edelman: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Ragnar Granit: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Haldan K. Hartline: Nobel Prize winner in Medicine
Dr. Robert Hofstadter: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Lawrence Klein: Nobel Prize winner in Economics
Dr. Simon Kuznets: Nobel Prize winner in Economics
Dr. Alan MacDiarmid: Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry
Dr. J. Robert Schrieffer: Nobel Prize winner in Physics
Dr. Steven Hahn - Pulitzer Prize winner, Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of History
Dr. Sol Goodgal - Microbiology professor - Major contributor to the study of genetic transformation in bacteria
Dr. Edward Doheny - Geology professor - Developed and heads Masters of Science in Applied Geosciences (MSAG) program
Babu Suthar
Matt Blaze - Associate Professor - Computer Science Department
Robert F. Boruch - University Trustee Chair Professor, Graduate School of Education
John Bowker (adjunct professor)
Eugenio Calabi - Thomas A. Scott Professor of Mathematics Emeritus - Mathematics Department
Dr. Arthur Caplan - Bioethicist
Britton Chance
Roger Allen- Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations
Thomas Childers - Department of History
Dr. Edward Peters- Henry Charles Lea Professor of History- Department of History
Dr. Peter Conn - Andrea Mitchell Term Professor of English
Francis X. Diebold - W.P. Carey Term Professor in Economics - Economics Department
John DiIulio - Department of Political Science
Dr. Michael Eric Dyson - Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities and Professor of Religious Studies
Warren Ewens
Martha J. Farah - Professor of Psychology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
Dr. Peter J. Freyd - Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Stephen Gale - Terrorism expert-Dept. of Political Science.
Ronald Granieri- Department of History
David Harbater - E. Otis Kendall Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Kathleen Hall Jamieson - University of Pennsylvania author and media analyst.
Dr. Aravind Joshi - Henry Salvatori Professor of Computer and Cognitive Science - Computer Science Department
Dr. Richard Kadison - Gustave C. Kuemmerle Professor of Mathematics - Mathematics Department
Dr. Donald F. Kettl - Stanley I. Sheerr Endowed Term Professor in the Social Sciences, Professor of Political Science & Director of the Fels Institute of Government
Louis Kahn: Noted architect, works include Jatiyo Sangsad Bhaban National Assembly Building, Bangladesh.
Dr. Bruce Kuklick - Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History - History Department
Dr. William Labov - Professor of Linguistics
Dr. Elihu Katz - Distinguished Trustee Professor of Communication
Dr. Mitch Marcus - RCA Professor of Artificial Intelligence - Computer Science Department
Dr. E. Ann Matter - Professor of Religious Studies
Dr. Walter McDougall - Department of History
Dr. Jeremy McInerney (Associate Professor, Graduate and Undergraduate Advisor) - Classical Studies Department
Dr. Burt Ovrut -Professor of Physics & one of the pioneers of superstring theory
Dr. Fernando Pereira - Andrew and Debra Rachleff Professor of Computer Science - Computer Science Department
Dr. Robert A. Rescorla Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor in Psychology and co-creator of the Rescorla-Wagner model
Dr. Ralph Rosen - Classical Studies Department Chair
Dr. Martin E. P. Seligman - Robert A. Fox Leadership Professor of Psychology - Psychology Department
Dr. Jeremy Siegel - Department of Finance
Dr. Rogers Smith - Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science - Political Science Department
Dr. Peter Stallybrass - Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities - English Department
Dr. Wendy Steiner - Richard L. Fisher Professor of English, Founding Director of the Penn Humanities Forum
Dr. Peter T. Struck - Classical Studies Department
Dr. Steve Tinney - Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Dr. Tukufu Zuberi - Sociology Department
Dr. Samuel H. Preston - Fredrick J. Warren Professor of Demography
Dr. Lightner Witmer - Inventor of the term "Clinical Psychology" and the founder of the First Psychological Clinic (1896)
Retrieved
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
SILVERLAKE said:
Better is opinion, but since Chicago, LA, SF, Seattle, and all the others didn't exist in colonial times there isn't really any other three cities to choose.

But Philly doesn't influence the US at all these days and Boston only some.

The three US cities today are NY, LA and SF
I don't know about LA. It's a great city, but I think the three U.S. cities today are NYC, Chicago, and San Francisco. LA's definitely in the top 5 though behind Philly, I think.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
285 Posts
The three U.S. cities today are Philadelphia (city of brotherly Love), Philadelphia (Origin of the U.S.A.), Philadelphia (First city in this worlds history to guarantee religious freedom). :)

Silverlake,

I just wanted to see if anyone was paying attention but my stats aren't way off for the doctors. 1 out of every 6 Docters in the U.S. was trained in Philadelphia that's still 16.8% which is huge considering we are a nation of 300 million.

Life in Philadelphia
Philadelphia is one of the world's great cities, filled with historic treasures and cutting-edge attractions. Revolutionary ideas are the hallmark of Philadelphia, and that has never been more true than today.

In recent years, Philadelphia has aggressively recruited high-tech and medical employers, fought to keep existing businesses in the city, and focused strongly on the tourism industry. Philadelphia is enjoying one of its greatest cultural and economical booms.



Consider the practical advantages of an education and career in Greater Philadelphia, which has:

More than 120 hospitals and clinics (including 24 teaching hospitals), 60 biomedical research companies, 44 pharmaceutical companies (producing one-fifth of all FDA-produced drugs), and 77 medical, surgical and dental instrument manufacturers.

The second-largest concentration of health education and research. Approximately 10 percent of the workforce is employed in this industry, and one out of every six doctors in the U.S. has had medical training in Philadelphia.

A cost of living that is substantially lower than New York, Los Angeles, Washington and Boston, and lower than many U.S. cities in housing and healthcare.

The nation's third highest concentration of research institutions. More than 80 institutions of higher education. Philadelphia boasts a higher concentration of educational resources than New York or Boston.

The fourth largest metropolitan area population in the U.S.



Philadelphia also has the best of everything in:

History. To learn about America, you must start in Philadelphia. Retrace the steps of Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson through Independence Hall, the Betsy Ross House, Christ Church and many other sites, including nearby Valley Forge battlefield

http://www.drexelmed.edu/ResidenciesandFellowships/LifeinPhiladelphia/tabid/687/Default.aspx

Philadelphia is the busiest port on the North Atlantic coast, and there are
450 foreign-owned companies in
the region, not to mention 223,000 tech workers.


The region ranks third in the nation for the number of health professions and related degrees confirmed.
Civic leaders are joining forces to turn the Delaware Valley/Philadelphia region into “Nanotech Valley.”

The region invests more than $700 million in R&D each year and sees more local patents issued than New York City and San Francisco.

One out of every six doctors in the country was trained in Philadelphia.

There are more than 100 hospitals, 150 research labs, four specialty hospitals doing research in pediatrics, cancer treatment and ophthalmology

80% of America’s pharmaceutical and biotechnology firms are located within a two-hour drive of the city.


Culture

Philadelphia is called the Paris of America. Home to 100 theater companies and more than 100 museums, Philly also has the world’s second largest collection of impressionist paintings.

Philadelphia hosts
8 professional sports teams
the country’s largest collegiate regatta
an historic college basketball rivalry
the famous Penn relays
the nation’s only
professional cycling race.


The Famous philadelphia Greek Picnic the originator of African American College Events.

31 years, The Greek Picnic is an annual week-long event during the month of July in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Originally designed as a reunion celebrating African-American college fraternities and sororities, it later gained popularity among a large population that do not attend college due to its various popular social activities. "Sister" events also include the Greek Festival in Hampton, Virginia, Freaknik in Atlanta, Georgia, and Bikers Week in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_Picnic
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
SILVERLAKE said:
Better is opinion, but since Chicago, LA, SF, Seattle, and all the others didn't exist in colonial times there isn't really any other three cities to choose.

But Philly doesn't influence the US at all these days and Boston only some.

The three US cities today are NY, LA and SF
Silverlake,

I have a request for you. I know you won't honor it, but I won't let that stop me from expressing ourselves.

Virtually all of us on this board have very strong feelings for our home town. That's fine, even a good thing. But most of us are adult enough that we don't find no need or desire to make each thread a competition, a chance to put our town as #1. In fact, I think the vast majority of us would prefer that this partisanship did not take place...it kills intelligent conversation and turns this board into the undesirable role of creating some stupid pecking order among our cities.

I think most of us have gotten to a point where we are milding amused at the threads that you start to elevate LA (an admittedly great city that needs no boosting). They're actually rather funny and, if one chooses, can be ignored.


What does make things difficult though is when you gratiouslly introduce LA into every thread started by others in a desire to remind everyone how great it is. When you do so, you bring down the nature of the hopefully engaging and RESPECTFUL discussion and make the thread absolutely useless.

I introduced a thread about five great cities of the northeast.....I did talk (legimitately, I felt) about their relationship to each other and how each has positives and negatives on how they deal with each other. no special "peckng order" was ever my desire. I mentioned a connection with Chicago NOT because it elevated my city, but due to a common history in the period from the late 1800's into the early 1900's. That association does not make Chicago "great".

If you want to think that LA, SF, and NY are the only "great cities" in America, that is your perogative. But sharing it...or more accuratel shoving it down our throats
ruins the very type of adult conversations that we adults would like to have. Maybe you're happy about it, maybe it is what you desire, maybe you are gettng what you want.....for your commentary really does have an effect on this board, a negative one that discourages safe and hoenst communications.

And let me make this clear again: NONE OF THIS REFLECTS ON THE GREAT CITY OF LOS ANGELES, OBVIOUSLY ONE OF THE U.S.'S GREATEST AND MOST IMPORTANT. L.A. is not responsible for you....and what you say and do has far less to do with LA than it does about you and your character.

Short of the moderators joining in here, I wish you would consider the effect you do have on others who wish to have an intelligent conversation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
mid-town said:
I don't know about LA. It's a great city, but I think the three U.S. cities today are NYC, Chicago, and San Francisco. LA's definitely in the top 5 though behind Philly, I think.
The 3 cities today are NY, DC, and Chicago in that order.
We all use Windows, so Seattle may be tied with LA (ent) for 4th.
 
1 - 20 of 78 Posts
Top