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I am just wondering when and what chance do we have of getting a decent reduction in the next decade? are we waiting for more people to move in along the waterfront? my dad worked in the city in the 70's and 80's. he said a few days ago, that even in 1980 there was much more dtown pedestrian activity.
 

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Well lets look at it this way, u increase tax u run the companies out to Va, u give incentives and they come back. I just wanna thanks our "fabulous" govenor for completely ruing the MD economy and passing slots. Yay the democrats know just what to do.
 

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I am just wondering when and what chance do we have of getting a decent reduction in the next decade? are we waiting for more people to move in along the waterfront? my dad worked in the city in the 70's and 80's. he said a few days ago, that even in 1980 there was much more dtown pedestrian activity.
The tax rate has inched down a little in recent years, but it's still way high compared to the counties. That's offset somewhat by lower assessments on property, but you still have to be ready to pay in the city. I don't think it will come down very much until the city gentrifies much more and there are fewer low income people that require expensive social services.

As for the sidewalks, I think your dad is right. I have been downtown all my working life and the number of pedestrians has changed. A big part of it, however, is the increasingly workaholic culture of Americans. When I started work, pretty much everybody went out of the building at lunch, did some shopping and took an hour. Now people hunker down with a bag of cat kibble at their PC. IMO, it's really pretty pathetic how much the quality of work life has deteriorated. Workers ought to be angrier, but they're scared to lose their jobs. On the other hand, back then tourists were pretty much zero. The increase in tourist traffic is amazing, although it is concentrated at the waterfront.
 

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Well lets look at it this way, u increase tax u run the companies out to Va, u give incentives and they come back. I just wanna thanks our "fabulous" govenor for completely ruing the MD economy and passing slots. Yay the democrats know just what to do.
You don't recall that this started nationwide on the other guy's (was that one of the Georges?) watch last year? That the economy has been poised for a crash for years due to overloaded consumer debt and irrational mortgages? How long you been looking? A couple weeks?

I guess you didn't notice that Maryland still has one of the strongest economies in the US (just try to get a job in Nevada or Michigan), one of the highest average incomes, one of the most educated populations and one of the lowest unemployment rates. That ain't too bad for "ruined". The unfortunate part is that you are one of the beneficiaries of this and you don't know or acknowledge it.
 

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You don't recall that this started nationwide on the other guy's (was that one of the Georges?) watch last year? That the economy has been poised for a crash for years due to overloaded consumer debt and irrational mortgages? How long you been looking? A couple weeks?

I guess you didn't notice that Maryland still has one of the strongest economies in the US (just try to get a job in Nevada or Michigan), one of the highest average incomes, one of the most educated populations and one of the lowest unemployment rates. That ain't too bad for "ruined". The unfortunate part is that you are one of the beneficiaries of this and you don't know or acknowledge it.
^^Its called goverment jobs, thast why unemployment is low, and yet where is the private sector? nowhere to be found. And i find my self to be an idependent as i cant stand either party.
 

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Baltimore/DC Corridorite
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The tax rate has inched down a little in recent years, but it's still way high compared to the counties. That's offset somewhat by lower assessments on property, but you still have to be ready to pay in the city. I don't think it will come down very much until the city gentrifies much more and there are fewer low income people that require expensive social services.

As for the sidewalks, I think your dad is right. I have been downtown all my working life and the number of pedestrians has changed. A big part of it, however, is the increasingly workaholic culture of Americans. When I started work, pretty much everybody went out of the building at lunch, did some shopping and took an hour. Now people hunker down with a bag of cat kibble at their PC. IMO, it's really pretty pathetic how much the quality of work life has deteriorated. Workers ought to be angrier, but they're scared to lose their jobs. On the other hand, back then tourists were pretty much zero. The increase in tourist traffic is amazing, although it is concentrated at the waterfront.
it really is pathetic. this country seems to have no concept of "living life" like the Europeans. a guy a met before told me you could get drunk at lunch in the 80's and come back to work. I am not in favor of that policy being reinstated but just mentioning. Course this is coming from a guy who ruined his life through alcoholism. that is the person I met. my guess is dtown is better now than in '80. I mean really after work, unless you have to, who wants to be sitting around at the PC?
 

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^^Its called goverment jobs, thast why unemployment is low, and yet where is the private sector? nowhere to be found. And i find my self to be an idependent as i cant stand either party.
The private sector is huge (a big part of why we have all those jobs), even in this state and city. In spite of the massive direct government sector, which is probably 25% or more of our economy, the other part is that government is a huge business magnet. That's why all those businesses have presence in DC, NVA and MD and why state and local government officials get down on their knees and beg when some new program is about to happen. The companies aren't here for the horse farms and they wouldn't be here if the getting government $$ were not of interest to every single corporation, non-profit and interest group on the planet.

We don't get HQ action, but they all have a branch here and a huge number of Baltimoreans work either in government, military or in those businesses that want to do sell stuff to the Federal government, which after all, is itself the biggest single business in the world. Furthermore, the best thing about all these entities is their stability. The Federal government, unlike a chip factory won't be moving to India any time soon. A development strategy that didn't recognize and exploit this would be like a town with a Toyota factory that ignored the car parts business. This isn't even a partisan issue since government oriented development strategies span presidents, governors, mayors and parties.
 

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it really is pathetic. this country seems to have no concept of "living life" like the Europeans. a guy a met before told me you could get drunk at lunch in the 80's and come back to work. I am not in favor of that policy being reinstated but just mentioning. Course this is coming from a guy who ruined his life through alcoholism. that is the person I met. my guess is dtown is better now than in '80. I mean really after work, unless you have to, who wants to be sitting around at the PC?
It is pathetic. Fortunately for me, I have a professional life where I can write my own hours at long as I'm accountable and so I make a point of getting out every day. I'm amazed, however, at my co-workers, in similar positions, who look at me coming in from lunch like I got some sort of undeserved gift. I don't understand the mentality, and you do have to wonder what we get from it. I also prefer the European approach that life should be worth living and that we shouldn't live like termites (being born, chewing and then dying). Fortunately I don't indulge in the 3 martini lunch either, but getting out soberly is good for workers, good for their productivity and good for local business.
 

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Use GPS devices to tax driving, and make the tax significant. That will be a boon for Baltimore and all Cities in America as there will be incentive to live, work and play in a place where there is density and transit options.

All of us city dwellers subsidize the suburban lifestyle by allowed the federal government to build highways and to fund the state highway administrations in building roads. Its time they paid their own way for their wasteful lifestyle.

That’s how you get people and businesses back in town.
 

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Use GPS devices to tax driving, and make the tax significant. That will be a boon for Baltimore and all Cities in America as there will be incentive to live, work and play in a place where there is density and transit options.

All of us city dwellers subsidize the suburban lifestyle by allowed the federal government to build highways and to fund the state highway administrations in building roads. Its time they paid their own way for their wasteful lifestyle.

That’s how you get people and businesses back in town.
"Wasteful lifestyle" What! Do you never leave your neighborhood and never use those dreaded highways? You can live in your 1940's row home with rats, crime and no parking but don't expect everyone else to. Not everyone chooses to live in a city. They shouldn't be attacked for living elsewhere. You might think you're cool and high on the intellectual ladder because you are an urban guy but we have the freedom to live anywhere we want. People in the counties can say the same about subsidizing the laughable city schools.

Do you actually want crat in Annapolis or DC knowing where you are and where you're driving to? The US isn't a tiny European country. We have vast space and need highways.
 

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The private sector is huge (a big part of why we have all those jobs), even in this state and city. In spite of the massive direct government sector, which is probably 25% or more of our economy, the other part is that government is a huge business magnet. That's why all those businesses have presence in DC, NVA and MD and why state and local government officials get down on their knees and beg when some new program is about to happen. The companies aren't here for the horse farms and they wouldn't be here if the getting government $$ were not of interest to every single corporation, non-profit and interest group on the planet.

We don't get HQ action, but they all have a branch here and a huge number of Baltimoreans work either in government, military or in those businesses that want to do sell stuff to the Federal government, which after all, is itself the biggest single business in the world. Furthermore, the best thing about all these entities is their stability. The Federal government, unlike a chip factory won't be moving to India any time soon. A development strategy that didn't recognize and exploit this would be like a town with a Toyota factory that ignored the car parts business. This isn't even a partisan issue since government oriented development strategies span presidents, governors, mayors and parties.
You're right but my concern is a growing government while the private sector shrinks. Even states are laying off. So should Feds. Sure it's good for the Balt/DC economy but it's not good for the big picture. A growing government means more taxes, more regulations, less private growth, slow economy, less IPO's, less disposable income and I can go on.

We need to bring back the manufacturing we lost. That's where true wealth is.
 

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You're right but my concern is a growing government while the private sector shrinks. Even states are laying off. So should Feds. Sure it's good for the Balt/DC economy but it's not good for the big picture. A growing government means more taxes, more regulations, less private growth, slow economy, less IPO's, less disposable income and I can go on.

We need to bring back the manufacturing we lost. That's where true wealth is.
Bringing back manufacturing is a much larger concern that will be determined by large global forces. It's in our interest to see wealth and income increase across the globe so we won't be at such a competitive disadvantage on manufacturing labor cost since there's just no wat to compete with a factory that pays a couple dollars per day. Unfortunately there's not much we can do about that locally. I'm always amazed to drive out O'Donnell St past Brewer's Hill and see all the old factories in that valley. It's hard to see that ever coming back in our lifetime. Even if it did, we would never have anything approaching the 50,000 workers that once worked at a place like Bethlehem; a revived steel mill would be mainly robotic, with a few tech geeks keeping the machines running.
 
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