SkyscraperCity banner

161 - 180 of 1041 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,734 Posts
You can never really directly translate anything from one language to another - there are always nuances in the meaning of the word. La raza in this case may very well have different untranslatable connotations from "the race."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
Angeline Apartments/PCC store on Rainer finally has its first elevated deck formed up along the Rainer edge of the site. The geology of this site is immersing as there really is some serious rock underneath some old fill (see second photo). I'm not used to seeing such rock on Seattle projects but then I'm mostly around downtown projects.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #164
"Fremont, Ballard and Wallingford are attracting companies and employees because of plentiful outdoor spaces, restaurants and proximity to downtown."
This was posted in an article about a software company expanding in Fremont, but it could apply to other areas in the city including Beacon Hill and Rainier Valley.

With Seattle Central planning to move the health sciences to the Pacific tower on Beacon Hill I wonder if BH/RV could capitalize and grow a niche hub of some sort? Talk about district energy infrastructure for the city started in the south end. Could green energy companies be attracted to the area and maybe even impact the warehouse/distribution zones to become more modern, greener, denser?
 

·
Journeyman
Joined
·
15,899 Posts
If Mt. Baker Station gets an upzone, maybe it'll be able to support an office component aided by access to UW, etc. But it'll still be harder to get to than SLU/CBD/PS.

Demand is always about tenants choosing to leap. But in terms of projected fundamentals, it's also about whether rail trumps the generally lower rents of south Seattle, and/or whether cheaper land will keep development cost low enough.

Offices can be tougher than apartments. With office you need developers to spend a lot of money to propose something, then tenants to sign preleases. With apartments you know it'll fill; the main question is whether rents will start/trend a bit higher or a bit lower than projected.
 

·
Correspondent
Joined
·
8,274 Posts
From todays DJC.

http://www.djc.com/news/ae/12062255.html

February 12, 2014

Project of the Month: Goodwill building goes from secondhand to standout

By CLAIR ENLOW
Special to the Journal

Seattle Goodwill has always stepped up to help get people jobs. Now it has stepped up to the corner of Rainier Avenue South and South Dearborn Street with a new building that creates an urban look and feel at the busy intersection.

In the Little Saigon neighborhood, tables and chairs are scattered on an inviting, live-in balcony three stories over the street. It's hard not to envy them. On a clear day, the lucky occupants of those chairs enjoy one of the best views of Mount Rainier to be had along the corridor.

People, not stuff

The nonprofit Goodwill Industries International and its Seattle arm collect donations of used goods and resell them — from clothes to books to furniture.

But the new building is not for stuff. It's filled primarily with busy people — learning computer skills, building work habits and practicing the art of getting a job.

There are youth programs, but most are for adults. Some of the people are homeless, have criminal records or don't speak English, and there are programs to help with these challenges.

It's about “stabilizing personal lives,” according to Michael Jurich, vice president and CFO of Seattle Goodwill.

Increasingly however, Goodwill's mission includes the planet. There's a natural connection between environmentalism and the reuse of goods. It's supported by market research that shows more people choose to shop at the stores because they believe in recycling and keeping usable goods out of landfills, according to Seattle Goodwill spokesperson Betsy McFeely.

There has been no lack of ideas for redeveloping Goodwill's acreage along South Dearborn Street over the years. The most ambitious would have made it a mixed retail and housing center, but the recession put a stop to that.

In the meantime, Goodwill outgrew the one-story brick buildings it has occupied for many decades, and administration and training functions had to find space in far-flung locations.

The building site was primarily industrial, used for truck storage. “It definitely was a blank slate,” said Jurich.

The new building is an anchor and a portal for Seattle Goodwill. One of the main goals was to give job training more accessibility, visibility and dignity, said architect Rich Franko of Mithun.

“It's all part of an effort to bring (job training) into the bosom of Goodwill and have it all feel really natural,” said McFeely.

Something worth saving

Setting the three-story building length-wise along Rainier Avenue was one of the first design decisions, and it sets up an entirely new relationship with the busy street. Low buildings, used car lots and strip mall-type buildings still line Rainier Avenue South, in highway fashion, to the south of the Goodwill site.

But there was also something there worth saving. A grand Bartram (hybrid) oak stands on the corner, in the middle of the sidewalk. The design team embraced it, pulling the footprint of the building back just enough to give the tree breathing room. Now people in the conference rooms on the top floor can see out into the canopy, rain or shine. “It's an exceptional tree,” said Dottie Faris, landscape architect with Mithun.

It might seem logical to put the entrance on the thoroughfare, too, but instead the design team chose to turn it inside, toward the center of the older Goodwill complex — with its large parking and donations area and its old brick buildings — and away from Rainier Avenue South.

The entrance to the new building opens onto Dearborn Place South, a street spur that serves the larger campus. Lining the long wall beside the entry is a substantial rain garden — a series of boxed-in terraces with lush plantings that enhance the emerging Goodwill campus without sacrificing its new urban style.

The building has re-set expectations for Seattle Goodwill. “We'd been in old buildings our entire life,” said Jurich. “We really didn't know the possibilities.”

And it shows what is possible on a modest budget. Architect Rich Franko explained: “It's a simple, orthogonal building with repetitive openings.”

Economical metal siding is punctuated with ochre fiber cement to accent the length of the facades. Yellow sills and headers bracket the view from inside on gray Seattle days.

Most of the length is filled with flexible classrooms and office space. However, “There are a couple of key moments,” said Franko. One of those “moments” — breaks in the repetitive pattern of the outer walls — is the entrance. One-story glass walls wrap around the building and the lobby inside, framed by projecting walls and ceiling. The walls inside are paneled with warm cedar, and the same material lines those walls as they project outward around the entrance.

Inside and out, eyes go to a large, glowing light sculpture by Seattle-based artist Yuri Kinoshita. It hangs beside a grand, open stairway — designed to draw people out of the elevators and into light and views — and get them moving.

The other “moments” are at the south end of the building. Right there beside the exceptional tree is a standout cistern. It's two stories high and holds up to 10,000 gallons of rainwater collected on the roof.

There is plenty to flush toilets inside the building, and it also waters plants and recharges the ground water through the terraced rain gardens. The system saves about 80 percent of the water supply that would otherwise come from the municipal source, and even during a heavy storm there is little polluting runoff with this system.

Then there's that balcony — projecting from the top floor near the tree canopy and above the traffic, focused on the mountain. Also lined with cedar paneling, it works like a family living room, where business is sometimes done. Wrapping around the corner, it's open on two sides.

“It's a place to eat lunch, sit outside and decompress, and look at the view,” said Jurich. “I've gone out there to read contracts on a sunny day. “

“It sets us up for a wonderful future,” said McFeely.

Jury comments:
“Wow. The team created a lot of value on a modest budget. Love the pop of ochre as a unifying element.

“Simple, rational design moves are strategically implemented for maximum impact with powerfully clean results.”


Goodwill Training and Job Education Center is a standout along busy Rainier Avenue South. The prominent balcony grabs the eye, and the cistern tells the world that Goodwill cares about the environment


The cedar-lined entry is oriented to the center of the Goodwill site, not Rainier Avenue.




A wrap-around balcony on the top floor looks out into a tree canopy. On a clear day, Mount Rainier dominates the view.



The two-story lobby is a lively gathering place, with an open mezzanine and stair, a light sculpture, and an intimate view of the Bartram oak tree outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,568 Posts
It helps define that awful corner as well. I hope they can do something about their store, it's in deplorable condition.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
Big news for the full block near Rainer and I-90 just behind the O Boy Oberto place. Maybe old news but I only noticed the sign when driving around this morning.


Hamlin Robinson school has bought the block and is building a new 3 story school since Seattle Schools have told them to leave TT Minor by fall 2016 according to http://hamlinrobinson.org/newhome



Nice Range Rover in the rendering.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
Great progress on the 5+1 story apartment building a few feet south of the Beacon Hill light rail station. There's a very small (and probably expensive garage below grade)



 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
Between Columbia City and Hillman City on east side of Rainier

Only by browsing the DPD site that I mentioned a few days ago did I come across this document that makes it clear that properties highlighted below are all part of a proposal by Quadrant for townhomes. KC property records don't show a sale of property yet for some or all of these parcels.

Townhomes along 42nd have already been through Design Review but the Rainier aspect of the project is not widely known (as far as I know).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,737 Posts
Big news for the full block near Rainer and I-90 just behind the O Boy Oberto place. Maybe old news but I only noticed the sign when driving around this morning.


Hamlin Robinson school has bought the block and is building a new 3 story school since Seattle Schools have told them to leave TT Minor by fall 2016 according to http://hamlinrobinson.org/newhome



Nice Range Rover in the rendering.
I see the fence every morning on my way to work. I didn't know what was going up there. Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
Recommendation DRB meeting is Tuesday, 2/25 for the Zion Prep site a stone's throw from Columbia City Light Rail Station. STB did a great write up on this in October. Still basically the same design. As I've probably written here before a better developer (or at least one with a longer term vision and profit outlook) would have a figured out a way to make a pedestrian connection to Edmunds or 35th Ave. Residents here will have to go out of their way to enjoy the CC business district.
http://www.seattle.gov/dpd/AppDocs/GroupMeetings/DRProposal3015157AgendaID4778.pdf
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
I see the fence every morning on my way to work. I didn't know what was going up there. Thank you!
I just realized there's the Range Rover in that rendering and a Tesla Model S. Geesh! No wonder: http://youtu.be/tksluFy4P4s
Seattle-based rapper Draze delivers a dope music video and track dedicated to highlighting the effects of gentrification on Seattle’s Central area and south end communities. Throughout the video, the rapper takes his fans on a journey through the rapidly changing urban areas of Seattle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #176
Seasun, thanks for keeping the south end updates going!

Regarding the Zion Prep design. This could be a turning point in south end development if locals can win better connection to CC and at least decrease the surface parking.
I like the golden-yellow on the H.R. School. Much needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,737 Posts
I just realized there's the Range Rover in that rendering and a Tesla Model S. Geesh! No wonder: http://youtu.be/tksluFy4P4s
Wow, when he sees me and my girlfriend walking our dogs he probably cringes. I live pretty much in the areas he's rapping about. I also lived in Brooklyn.

I can't afford to rent a house in the north end and this is closer to work. Am I still bad a guy Draze?

Is it racist when a white community makes a song about black people moving in??? I played basketball with a high school kid 2 hours ago at the park nearby. He asked if he could join me because he didn't have a ball and I said yes, and this is not the first time this has happened. (also one of the reasons I love basketball, it's easy to share the sport). He asked me if I was racist before we started playing. I laughed and pointed at the picture of a black man on my t shirt lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
That video should be an eye opener for a lot of people..

He says "I know we are supposed to be a melting pot, but is it wrong to want to live with my own?"

That could have been a quote from Nathan Bedford Forrest or Bull Connor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
At least the video is a pretty good tour of the CD and Rainer Valley. Definitely stereotypes black people. Maybe having a white guy on guitar was pretty progressive for this artist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Wow, when he sees me and my girlfriend walking our dogs he probably cringes. I live pretty much in the areas he's rapping about. I also lived in Brooklyn.

I can't afford to rent a house in the north end and this is closer to work. Am I still bad a guy Draze?

Is it racist when a white community makes a song about black people moving in??? I played basketball with a high school kid 2 hours ago at the park nearby. He asked if he could join me because he didn't have a ball and I said yes, and this is not the first time this has happened. (also one of the reasons I love basketball, it's easy to share the sport). He asked me if I was racist before we started playing. I laughed and pointed at the picture of a black man on my t shirt lol.
I think there's nothing wrong with feeling nostalgic, and feeling a personal loss when the things you like and are used to change. There are plenty of Jews who feel that way about areas of the Bronx where they grew up, or ethnic Italians in other parts of New York, etc.

However, this artist goes further and has a line in that video that is something like "I don't see much difference between guys in suits and guys in white robes." Equating professionals in suits who happen to live in the CD or Rainier Valley to KKK members is pretty outrageous.
 
161 - 180 of 1041 Posts
Top