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A kg of Honey is worth $10 in Somalia and around the same on the world market. A Bee-farm harvests around 360kg annually, that would be atleast $3600 for the Beekeeper, which is not bad if its also complimented with traditional farming.

It generates a lot of jobs, and sustains a beautification culture in the form of gardens.







In Sallaxlay
 

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blooming periods for acacia trees in Somalia

Sogsog acacia tree in full bloom

Somalia is endowed with acacia trees. The species, mainly deciduous , is called acacia commiphora. It is in 4 categories and has four names in Somali: Sogsog, Maraa, Qudhaá and Galool. Through my observations since May last year, I came to know that these types of acacia trees bloom different times before losing their leaves in the Autumn. The Sogsog (see the tree under which I am sitting at the top of this website) blooms between March and August, the Maraa and Qudhaáa between June and Agust while the Galool blooms between August and October

-- Somali Honey
 

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Sidr Honey

Sidr honey from Yemen is the rarest and most expensive honey in the world. Sidr honey is sought after because of it’s exquisite taste, it’s health benefits as a natural medicine, and even as an aphrodisiac. The demand for real Sidr honey from Yemen is so high that it is known to sell for up to 1000$ per Kilogram! -- Source
Sidr trees in Somalia:


 

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Great topic!

As an avid honey lover, let me say that Somali Honey is among the best in the world. Ours is of supreme quality and is in high demand locally. At our farm we grow honey and it is locally consumed within Somalia. There is an international market especially in the Middle East if the government and relevant ministries aggressively market Somali honey abroad.











 

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^Nice pictures, and agreed, but I think we shouldn't rely on our politicians for anything, self-reliance in all walks of life should be our aim. In this case setting up a non-governmental lobbying group that aggressively markets Somali brands around the world, be it honey, incense, live-stock, aquaculture, agriculture, etc, would be better.

The biggest employer in East Africa used to be the Somali horticulture industry, with high value crops like bananas alone employing 120 thousand people. What's preventing us from cranking up our diversity in the form of flower-cultivation (which could be done along side beekeeping), coffee and tea-plantations and other big money-makers, if not neglect and lack of creativity?

Somali horticulture could provide a million jobs (and another million indirectly) with careful planning and investment. I know of no other industry that could be such a strong job-generator, other than the livestock industry.
 
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