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About the gap in the building: they're going to close that when the two towers are connected at the top. The building is very complex with all the angles and they're not sure yet how the building will 'settle' itself. The building is erected in a slightly more upright angle than its final position due to its enormous weight. When everything is connected on top, the building is fixed at groundlevel.

As you can see on this last picture they are pouring concrete around the steel collumns of the construction. In this way, the collumns can take higher pressures. The entire construction works as a hull to create stability. The forces on the construction are not the same everywhere, so in some places the stability beams are closer together (there are more crosses in some places, view the renderings too).
Interesting, if you don't know much about construction, like me you never would have thought about things like this, and it all sounds so logical when you read it. It's a very interesting looking building that's also a very interesting enginering project.
It will be spectaculair when they are going to build the 'bridge', thanks for the pictures.
 

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About the gap in the building: they're going to close that when the two towers are connected at the top. The building is very complex with all the angles and they're not sure yet how the building will 'settle' itself. The building is erected in a slightly more upright angle than its final position due to its enormous weight. When everything is connected on top, the building is fixed at groundlevel.

As you can see on this last picture they are pouring concrete around the steel collumns of the construction. In this way, the collumns can take higher pressures. The entire construction works as a hull to create stability. The forces on the construction are not the same everywhere, so in some places the stability beams are closer together (there are more crosses in some places, view the renderings too).
Thanks, that's very helpful! I've read an article talking aoubt the buildings would be erected in more upright angle but not exactly mentioned the ground part...:)

BTW, two pics taken on apr 20th with my cellphone.



 

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Building the cantilever section

WOW now i know where all the world steel production is going. this one is truly a feat of engineering, and i'll bet there is at least 300.000 tons of fabricated steel in it. I can't wait to see the cantalever sections begin. also notice how the crossbracing near the the base is more intense at certain points for much higher load transfer, and the cantalever sections have long diagonal bracing as if they are "tied back" to the "masts". I'm guessing that they will just build it outward without any type of "backstay" system employed.
Once they reach the floor where the cantilever part begins, they will keep building the towers towards their roofs (the one higher than the other, because the roof of the total building has an angle as well). When they will have nearly reached the roofs, a sort of 'hanging' bridge will be built outwards from both towers towards eachother. When the bridges connect, they have actually constructed the ground floor of the entire cantilever part. From that point they can start building the floors. This method is easier than building enormous scaffolding from the ground ;-) It will be interesting to view the whole process of building such a cantilever section...
 

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Somnium Quinti
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Once they reach the floor where the cantilever part begins, they will keep building the towers towards their roofs (the one higher than the other, because the roof of the total building has an angle as well). When they will have nearly reached the roofs, a sort of 'hanging' bridge will be built outwards from both towers towards eachother. When the bridges connect, they have actually constructed the ground floor of the entire cantilever part. From that point they can start building the floors. This method is easier than building enormous scaffolding from the ground ;-) It will be interesting to view the whole process of building such a cantilever section...
:eek2:
That will be the most incredible site in Engineering history!
All you beijing forumers... please keep us well updated when the start work on the cantilever bridge!!!
 

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About the gap in the building: they're going to close that when the two towers are connected at the top. The building is very complex with all the angles and they're not sure yet how the building will 'settle' itself. The building is erected in a slightly more upright angle than its final position due to its enormous weight. When everything is connected on top, the building is fixed at groundlevel.

As you can see on this last picture they are pouring concrete around the steel collumns of the construction. In this way, the collumns can take higher pressures. The entire construction works as a hull to create stability. The forces on the construction are not the same everywhere, so in some places the stability beams are closer together (there are more crosses in some places, view the renderings too).
I imagine it's similar to how certain types of bridges are constructed. Stability has to be given to the huge forces of the tower loads until joined, then so much more pressure is taken away from the 2 ends of the structure after connecting. Any major stability problems (at worst collapsing) increase of course as the 2 ends climb higher.

Similar structural engineering techniques were inherited while building the Luxor Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. Until the 4 sides connected at the very top, the risks grew as the walls grew.

 
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