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Tracking systems key to safety, says Emsa
17 June 2009
Lloyd's List

THE European Union is watching you, with spy-in-the-sky satellites already delivering long-range identification and tracking of shipping to the headquarters of the European Maritime Safety Agency in Lisbon, a conference to inaugurate the organisation’s headquarters was told yesterday.

Most participating states can already access the data and all 32 countries — including the 27 members of the European Union and Greenland, Netherlands Antilles, Aruba, Iceland and Norway — are set to be able to do so by the end of the month.

The development makes it possible to track any ship within a 1,000 mile zone of a participating state’s coastline, irrespective of flag. Ultimately, the master plan is to link up similar LRIT systems around the world to provide global coverage.

US Coast Guard assistant commandant for marine safety, security and stewardship Brian Salerno told attendees that Emsa and the USCG share many common goals, including maritime safety, security and environmental protection.

Rear Admiral Salerno said that while there was no hard evidence that the current downturn was hitting safety standards or crew training, it was noticeable that detentions in the US increased last year for the first time in several years.

The US was experimenting with satellite technology that could extend the range of LRIT from 1,000 miles to 2,000 miles and trials had been promising, he said.

LRIT is different from the automatic identification system in that it is not open access but restricted to authorised users.

The two systems serve different purposes; AIS is there to aid navigation safety, while LRIT serves the needs of member states. For instance, masters in the Gulf of Aden may switch off AIS to make their details inaccessible to pirates, but the US is able to continue to track US flag vessels using LRIT.

Meanwhile, analysis of statistics for 2008 produced by Emsa has shown that loss of life and the number and cost of accidents on ships in European waters is significantly higher than in the recent past.

Deliberate pollution also remains at high levels, although accidental pollution has substantially decreased.

The figures from the European Union agency, which take in Norway and Iceland as well as the EU, show that 754 vessels were involved in 670 accidents in and around Europe in the year in question. They include the continent’s fishing fleet as well as the merchant marine.

This compares with 762 vessels involved in 715 accidents, and 535 vessels involved in 505 accidents in 2006. In 2008, 82 seafarers were killed on ships in and around EU waters. That total is the same as in 2007, but an increase of six on 2006.

While at first glance the number of accidents has been reduced, closer analysis of monthly patterns reveals that the lower 2008 toll is explained by a slump in maritime traffic in December, attributable to the economic downturn.

Emsa executive director Willem de Ruiter said: “This year’s review again shows that accidents in EU waters lead to enormous costs and significant loss of life.

“There are also major concerns that, although the shipping downturn will give owners and operators the time to carry out much-needed maintenance that was delayed during the boom period, many will not do so because they have reduced funds to pay for such activities.”
 

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Tracking systems key to safety, says Emsa
17 June 2009
Lloyd's List

THE European Union is watching you, with spy-in-the-sky satellites already delivering long-range identification and tracking of shipping to the headquarters of the European Maritime Safety Agency in Lisbon, a conference to inaugurate the organisation’s headquarters was told yesterday.

Most participating states can already access the data and all 32 countries — including the 27 members of the European Union and Greenland, Netherlands Antilles, Aruba, Iceland and Norway — are set to be able to do so by the end of the month.

The development makes it possible to track any ship within a 1,000 mile zone of a participating state’s coastline, irrespective of flag. Ultimately, the master plan is to link up similar LRIT systems around the world to provide global coverage.

US Coast Guard assistant commandant for marine safety, security and stewardship Brian Salerno told attendees that Emsa and the USCG share many common goals, including maritime safety, security and environmental protection.

Rear Admiral Salerno said that while there was no hard evidence that the current downturn was hitting safety standards or crew training, it was noticeable that detentions in the US increased last year for the first time in several years.

The US was experimenting with satellite technology that could extend the range of LRIT from 1,000 miles to 2,000 miles and trials had been promising, he said.

LRIT is different from the automatic identification system in that it is not open access but restricted to authorised users.

The two systems serve different purposes; AIS is there to aid navigation safety, while LRIT serves the needs of member states. For instance, masters in the Gulf of Aden may switch off AIS to make their details inaccessible to pirates, but the US is able to continue to track US flag vessels using LRIT.

Meanwhile, analysis of statistics for 2008 produced by Emsa has shown that loss of life and the number and cost of accidents on ships in European waters is significantly higher than in the recent past.

Deliberate pollution also remains at high levels, although accidental pollution has substantially decreased.

The figures from the European Union agency, which take in Norway and Iceland as well as the EU, show that 754 vessels were involved in 670 accidents in and around Europe in the year in question. They include the continent’s fishing fleet as well as the merchant marine.

This compares with 762 vessels involved in 715 accidents, and 535 vessels involved in 505 accidents in 2006. In 2008, 82 seafarers were killed on ships in and around EU waters. That total is the same as in 2007, but an increase of six on 2006.

While at first glance the number of accidents has been reduced, closer analysis of monthly patterns reveals that the lower 2008 toll is explained by a slump in maritime traffic in December, attributable to the economic downturn.

Emsa executive director Willem de Ruiter said: “This year’s review again shows that accidents in EU waters lead to enormous costs and significant loss of life.

“There are also major concerns that, although the shipping downturn will give owners and operators the time to carry out much-needed maintenance that was delayed during the boom period, many will not do so because they have reduced funds to pay for such activities.”
stop spam,, open a general news thread, please!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Then it will be lost amidst a deluge of topics. Tracking mechanisms are getting increasingly more important not only because of weather / safety reasons, but also for countering piracy attacks. As a result, key topics being discussed in the shipping industry ought to have its own thread.

Country threads are far more appropriate to be generic.
 
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