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Hi all

Does anybody know when construction work will roughly start at Ulster hospital I know they have started from building out of the ground,but I mean for the likes of electrical,plumbing,heating,ventilation etc.I know tenders went out in August, would the contracts have even been awarded yet?If the contracts havent been given out yet,any idea when.Just trying to find out a bit of info as iam a plumber and iam hoping my old employer gets the contract there which is Harveys Glengormley.

Thanks in advance
 

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Posted in a different thread but reposting here as it's more relevant.



Health Minister Edwin Poots is due to cut the first sod on the next development stage at the Ulster Hospital in Dundonald, Co Down.

The £232m development will see a new ward block constructed and also, a new acute services block.

Welcoming the development, Minister Poots said: "The commencement of construction of the new ward block and acute services block mark the beginning of the next vital phase of redevelopment at the Ulster Hospital.

"A number of new facilities, such as the Renal Unit and Critical Care Unit, have already been constructed and are operational on the site.

"A new ward block and acute services block will enhance these facilities further. These modern facilities will be constructed using the latest innovations in design and technology and will be well-equipped to provide secure, safe, high quality services to patients."

The new ward block, which will replace the existing main ward block constructed in 1962, will cost an estimated £115m and will provide capacity for 288 new beds. This will facilitate 12 inpatient wards with 24 ensuite rooms offering day surgery, endoscopy, angiography, pharmacy and support services.

The second phase, the new acute services block, will cost an estimated £108m and will provide 170 beds. The block will include an acute assessment unit, wards, an emergency department and parking.

The ward block is expected to open in early 2017, followed by the acute services block in early 2018.

In 2010, a £53m Critical Care unit was opened by the then Health Minister Michael McGimpsey.










Construction is about to start on the next phase of Avanti Architects’ radical overhaul of Ulster Hospital at Dundonald, a major acute hospital serving the Belfast area.

Enabling works – which will allow the existing hospital to continue to operate without disruption – have been completed and, with the appointment of Graham-BAM Healthcare Partnership as contractor, construction is now beginning on a new 288-bed ward block.

Each of the 12 wards will have 24 single bedrooms with en-suites, providing privacy and dignity for all patients. The new building will also accommodate a day surgery department, pharmacy and cardiac investigation unit.

The design has been developed by Avanti Architects with Belfast practice Kennedy FitzGerald Architects. As with other recent collaborations, including Portadown Health and Care Centre and Grangewood, a new mental health crisis unit outside Londonderry, Ulster Hospital will provide a modern, bright, therapeutic environment bringing very real benefits to the local population.

The new six-storey ward block is arranged around a series of landscaped courtyards. Each of the four ward floors has generous glazing to maximise natural daylight in both rooms and corridors, and also provide views out to the natural environment.

The ward floors are defined externally by large areas of distinctive curtain wall, made up of both transparent and back-painted glass spandrels framed in a light ceramic-tiled rainscreen.

Below the wards are the day surgery and pharmacy departments. This level has an engineering brick envelope which forms a plinth to the four-storey form of the wards, and also picks up on materials used elsewhere on the hospital campus.

The ward block is expected to be completed in July 2016 and will pave the way for the planned next phase of the hospital’s transformation.

Avanti Architects was appointed by the South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust as lead consultant, masterplanner and architect for the complete redevelopment of the hospital which, at over 50 years old, badly needed updating to deliver healthcare effectively. The masterplan has successfully resolved the many complexities of designing high-quality healthcare facilities on a steeply sloping hospital site.

The proposed next phase – currently at detailed design stage and scheduled to start on site next year – is an acute services block which includes an emergency department, acute assessment unit, specialist wards, radiology and mortuary.

Looking ahead still further, the masterplan will be completed by the construction of another major building to accommodate an outpatients department, diagnostic and treatment centre, separate children’s unit and a new main entrance to the hospital.
 

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The new 288 bed Inpatient Ward Block at the Ulster Hospital is currently in the 18th Month of a 38 month construction programme. On Wednesday 3rd December 2014 Northern Ireland Health Minister, Jim Wells and Finance Minister, Simon Hamilton visited the Ulster Hospital to celebrate the topping out ceremony of the new £80m 30,000m2 building.

The Ministers also announced approval for the next phase of the redevelopment of the Ulster Hospital, a new 30,000m2 Acute Services Block, which will start on site later in 2015.





 

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£41m announced for Ulster Hospital

Health Minister Simon Hamilton has announced a £41m investment for the new acute services block at the Ulster Hospital. Speaking during a visit to the hospital, he said: "I am delighted to announce that I will make over £41m capital funding available in 2016/17 to take forward the second phase of the construction of the acute services block at the Ulster Hospital."

The Acute Services Block is under construction and located alongside the new Inpatient ward block which is nearing completion.

Construction progress image agallery available here - http://www.setrust.hscni.net/hospitals/2792.htm
 

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GRAHAM-BAM appointed for £95m Ulster Hospital scheme

South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust has appointed the GRAHAM-BAM Healthcare Partnership, a joint venture between GRAHAM Construction and BAM, to deliver Ulster Hospital’s new £95 million Acute Services Block – currently the largest live healthcare project in Ireland.

The Acute Services Block is part of the Trust’s wider redevelopment plan for the Belfast hospital, replacing the outdated existing main ward block and other specialist acute services within the wider hospital estate. This building will sit adjacent to a new £86 million ward facility presently being constructed by GRAHAM-BAM Healthcare Partnership on the same complex, scheduled to complete in autumn this year.

The GRAHAM-BAM Healthcare Partnership was appointed to the four year, £185 million construction framework in 2013. It has now been appointed as main contractor to deliver the second facility – an eight-storey, 31,000 sq m Acute Services Block, incorporating specialist wards, support services, assessment unit, inpatient imaging department, and a new emergency department which will have capacity for 110,000 attendances per year. - See more at: http://specificationonline.co.uk/news-article/9942/graham-bam-graham-bam-appointed-for-amppoundm-ulster-hospital-scheme#sthash.KCnOJzQD.QY5tXhWb.dpuf


Acute Services Block


 

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Looking forward to this project being completed. Has there been any discussion on what will happen to the existing buildings once everyone has moved across the the new buildings?

The existing main building is an eyesore off the main carriage way, it really does look 3rd world.
 

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According to the BBC the new inpatient ward opened today in the Ulster Hospital. The new Accute ward is now scheduled to open in early 2020.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-39460245

I've been trying to find information on what buildings will be knocked down once the move has taken place, if any buildings are knocked down at all. The Ulster is a bit of an eye sore from the Upper Newtownards road so it would be nice to see the new shinny buildings that so much of our tax money went into creating.
I will also be interested to see if the new wards will result in a net increase in bed capacity or a decrease once the old wards are shut as they don't seem to mention that on the news.
 

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Hard to believe they've been at this since 2002.
Is it? It's been a pretty extensive phased redevelopment of an operational hospital site. If they had closed the site, demolished and rebuilt then it would have been quicker.
 

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I remember being on a tour bus in Corfu, driving passed a hospital under construction and the tour guide telling us they had been building it for 20 years and every time an election came up they would put in some new windows and talk about it before construction slowed down until the next election. Maybe we should have elections every year.
All of the new buildings where built on vacant sites from memory I'm guessing the slow pace was mainly down to budget constraints since they can't borrow money over here, which is probably a good thing giving the competence of our political masters.
 

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since they can't borrow money over here
The whole government departments not being able to borrow from the banks 'thing' was brought in by Thatcher and it's UK wide- technically they have to finance everything through tax collecting, rent etc. You only have to look at council housing- the NIHE hasn't built a single thing in over 20 years but a housing association can do it for them as it's a charity and there's no law stopping them borrow money from the banks at decent interest rates. I'm not 100% sure what was Maggie's rationale for stopping agencies borrowing. I can imagine she put it about that it was to stop the government losing the head of itself and getting into debt. And I'm sure privately she wanted to emasculate all the local authorities (abolishing Londons GLC is the most obvious one). But whatever the optics or the 'conspiracy', I don't think I've heard a proper explanation.
 
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