SkyscraperCity banner

13381 - 13398 of 13398 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,682 Posts
^^USA has realized that immigration has to be limited as Americans find themselves jobless, even if those immigrants add value.
That is only during Republican but when Democrats come they don't care they allow any one inside so in future even if America becomes like middle east they don't care like Congress.

Pseudo liberals will bring the world down, don't care for country except Middle east where only one system works.:bash:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
^^ So should we do the opposite?? be a pseudo nationalist, pseudo religious, pseudo language fanatic, pseudo caste fanatic, pseudo sexual orientation fanatic and fight to protect our own in a zero sum game?

There are negatives and positives to both arguments. We cannot be holed up in our own beliefs and impose them on others. The discussion here was about immigrants. Nothing to do with nationalism. We need to take steps to address an issue rather than be emotional and make generalized statements.

If you talk about the US, immigrants have helped the American society a lot, which cannot be ignored. Unchecked immigration is a problem and that needs to be resolved. Issue is similar in India and even within India.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Mumbai's infra is a shambles, particularly transport, but nobody cares there as it has always been so with slums, open sewers, sewage in creeks etc.
I quite disagree. Mumbai infra, viz. public transport (viz. suburban trains), roads, streetlights, footpaths, power situation, and water supply situation, is miles better than Blore.

As regards open sewers and like, that's untrue too. What you see as open sewers are like large Rajakaluves, they normally will be open.

After having lived in Blore for 9 years and Mumbai for 20+ years, I feel:

- The worst areas of Mumbai are much worse than the worst areas of Blore.

- The best areas of Mumbai are much better than the best areas of Blore.

- The median areas of Mumbai are quite a bit better than the median areas of Blore.

(where by "better" I mean in terms of look and feel, infrastructure, governance and quality of life)

And before anyone says "Then why don't you go back to Mumbai", well, what can I say. My job is here, hence I have to be here. Besides I must add, Blore has its plus points too: the weather, the coffee, the food, and the people are by and large peace-loving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
^^Guess you are a 'Mumbaikar', having lived in Mumbai for 20+ years. Not surprising as most Mumbaikars claim greatness for Mumbai, including its heavily stretched, over-crowded suburban system, though it probably has no parallel in the world for crushing conditions (It also accounts for over 3000 deaths annually fyi).
But these are passing things for Mumbaikars & they always tend to ignore such issues in discussions (Btw one Mumbaikar on SSCI has repeatedly claimed that slum dwellers that live in abject squalor in Mumbai were better off than those living in formal housing in other Indian cities!).
Its great that Fadnavis finally put his foot down to the neglect of transport & went berserk after it - good for Mumbai as it badly needed a transport upgrade.

Going by last census (2011), Mumbai had almost 42% living in slums. No. of slums - 11.35 lakhs, population 52.06 lakhs (city pop then was 124.42 lakhs). These numbers beat every city in slum population in India & perhaps the whole world.

So, you need to focus on how many in numbers were the so-called "worst areas" of Mumbai & compare those numbers with the numbers of "worst areas" for Bangalore or other cities, rather than talk just about how much worse were the worst areas of Mumbai & worst areas elsewhere without any reference to how much of it was worst.
For example, its pathetic to see almost every rail track & street lined lined up with slums in India's commercial capital & one of the gateways of India.

For reference, slum populations for other Indian cities as per census-2011 were as follows: Bangalore - 7.13L (8.39%); Pune - 6.91L (22.10%); Chennai - 13.42L (28.89%); Kolkata - 14.10L (31.35%); Hyderabad - 22.87L (32.70%).

Likewise, you would need to check how many by count were the good areas in Mumbai & how many were the good areas in other cities.

On these counts, Mumbai fares very poorly even for an Indian city. So, I'm not sure what quality of life you were referring to. Look & feel are an individual's POV.

From my observations, I can say that the bad areas in Bangalore are the ones flooded with migrants - & these are recent transformations & growing, commencing from the last decade or two. Earlier, the "worst areas" were City mkt & Chikpet - old Bangaloreans would remember this. But now, its areas like ORR & WF & spreading to HSR, BTM, JP nagar etc. If you check older areas like Basavanagudi or erstwhile Jayanagar or Sadashivnagar or Girinagar, they are still very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,345 Posts
This actually belongs to the Karnataka economy thread, but the latter gets very few views...

Karnataka, Tamil Nadu rise to the top of India’s economic league tables

With the exception of Andhra Pradesh, all the southern states have moved up the league tables, the latest update to Mint’s State Economy Tracker shows



Reversing months of decline, southern states saw a rise in economic activity and moved up the charts in January, the latest update to Mint’s State Economy Tracker shows. With the exception of Andhra Pradesh, all the southern states moved up the league tables. Karnataka moved from fifth position in December to the top of the charts in January, followed by Tamil Nadu at the second spot.

Mint’s State Economy Tracker, launched earlier this year, is a first-of-its-kind attempt to measure the pace of economic activity at the state level based on seven high-frequency indicators. The seven indicators encompass consumer demand (vehicle sales, air passenger growth), financial metrics (inflation and credit growth), a barometer of industrial activity (power demand), and public finance metrics (public investments and tax receipts). The final state rankings are based on a composite score, which gives equal weights to each indicator.

Most indicators capture monthly growth over the year-ago period. In the case of vehicle sales and credit growth, the latest quarterly year-on-year growth figures have been considered. The public finance indicators reflect provisional year-to-date numbers, as reported by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG).

The improved performance of Karnataka and Tamil Nadu in the latest update was largely due to an uptick in public capex spending in these states. Karnataka also saw a pick-up in tax revenue growth, while Tamil Nadu’s tax revenues continue to be lacklustre. At the third spot behind Karnataka and Tamil Nadu stands West Bengal, which has managed to beat the slowdown in passenger vehicle sales affecting other states of the country.

Among prosperous states (with relatively high per capita income), the western states continue to lag the rest. Gujarat was at the bottom of the heap in January while Maharashtra was at eighth position. Gujarat was ranked tenth in December while Maharashtra was ranked seventh that month.

The ten largest state economies in the country, all of which exceeded ₹5 trillion in GSDP as of 2017-18, find a place in Mint's State Economy Tracker. Other state economies have been clubbed into two broad categories: mid-sized state economies (GSDP between ₹3-5 trillion) and small-sized state economies (GSDP less than ₹2 trillion).

Uttar Pradesh, which was ranked the top state in December saw the sharpest slide in the latest rankings. India’s most populous state saw a sharp slide in year-to-date public capex spending, decline in power demand, and a sharp rise in inflation in January --- all of which contributed to its fall in the league tables.

While southern states have made an impressive comeback in the latest rankings, thanks largely to an improvement in public capex spending, their ability to sustain high capex spend could come under a cloud as the broader economy grapples with the fallout of Covid-19 and the supply chain disruptions it is causing. Southern and western states may be hit harder because of these disruptions as they are integrated to a greater extent with global supply chains.

The recommendations of the fifteenth finance commission, which has hit the southern states harder than the rest could also dampen the ability of state governments in the south to ramp up public spending. These headwinds could slow down the southern states, and affect their rankings in the league tables in the coming months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
An article had appeared on citizenmatters (link below) that misguided people into believing that Bellandur (ward no.150) was a cash cow for BBMP.

http://bengaluru.citizenmatters.in/bangalore-property-tax-data-analysis-33077

This is incorrect & far from true as the average tax it yields per sq km is low, even lesser than the ward-wise tax average, as is clear from the table below. Bellandur's contribution seems high only because it is a jumbo ward that occupies a very large area - 26.4 sqkm. Average size of a BBMP ward is just 3.58 sqkm.

No ward can claim to make huge, big or sizable contribution because even though Bellandur is so large by area & contributes highest amount, its share is a mere 5.3% - too less to make any significant claim. However, central areas in general contribute highest per unit area due to very high tax rates as also more number of commercial centers.

None of the first 15 topmost tax yielding wards for BBMP by unit area are IT areas!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
Hurray! Long overdue but some action at last against all those that violate building bye-laws, pay low property taxes (even if they pay at all) but keep screaming about poor infra, claim discrimination, make bogus claims of bigger tax contribution etc..
Now, they will be paying higher taxes & make some contribution to the city for a change instead of just making demands - by living in buildings with violations & paying more tax!

Assembly clears Bill to penalise illegal buildings in B’luru
DHNS Bengaluru

The Legislative Assembly passed four Bills on Friday, including one that seeks to penalise unauthorised buildings in the Bengaluru municipal limits.

The Karnataka Municipal Corporations (Amendment) Bill proposes to levy double the property tax as a penalty on buildings that have violated the norms. “The law already has a provision to levy a penalty as part of the property tax in Mysuru, Mangaluru, Hubballi-Dharwad, Kalaburagi and other cities, but Bengaluru has been left out. With this amendment, the penalty provision will be made applicable to building violations in Bengaluru as well,” Home Minister Basavaraj Bommai, who piloted the Bill on Chief Minister B S Yediyurappa’s behalf, said.

Law Minister J C Madhuswamy added that the penalty was not a permanent feature. “The penalty is only till the corporation takes action,” he said.

Some members expressed apprehension that the penalty will amount to regularisation of unauthorised construction. “If this becomes an implied right and we cannot take action or demolish, what then?” Chickpet MLA Uday Garudachar. Former Congress minister H K Patil also had the same doubt.

“This is not a regularisation measure,” Bommai clarified.

The home minister also said that Bill would also bring clarity on the fees to be collected for laying optical fibre cables (OFC) across the state. “There was no clarity on fee fixation because the Act says, ‘levying of such fees or annual track rent’. We have replaced the word ‘or’ with ‘and’,” Bommai said. “So going forward, there’ll be one fee levied at the time of laying OFC and then an annual rent.”

Three other Bills were passed in the Assembly - the Karnataka Open Places (Prevention of Disfigurement) (Amendment) Bill to extend its applicability to all municipal areas, the Karnataka State Universities (Amendment) Bill to bifurcate Gulbarga University to set up Raichur University, and the Karnataka Municipalities (Amendment) Bill to introduce the NOTA in ULB elections.

Two new Bills tabled

The government on Friday tabled the Karnataka Repealing of Certain Enactments and Regional Laws Bill that will do away with at least 156 existing laws that have become redundant or insignificant. This includes 21 Acts relating to the Belagavi, 1 to Coorg, 16 of Kalaburagi, 15 of Mangaluru and Kollegal areas, and 7 of Mysuru. Also, 96 amendment Acts from the year 2016 to 2019 will be repealed, according to the Bill. The Sarais Act, 1867, the Laws Local Extent Act, 1874 and the Dekkhan Agriculturists Relief Act, 1879, are some of the laws.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
An article had appeared on citizenmatters (link below) that misguided people into believing that Bellandur (ward no.150) was a cash cow for BBMP.

http://bengaluru.citizenmatters.in/bangalore-property-tax-data-analysis-33077

This is incorrect & far from true as the average tax it yields per sq km is low, even lesser than the ward-wise tax average, as is clear from the table below. Bellandur's contribution seems high only because it is a jumbo ward that occupies a very large area - 26.4 sqkm. Average size of a BBMP ward is just 3.58 sqkm.

No ward can claim to make huge, big or sizable contribution because even though Bellandur is so large by area & contributes highest amount, its share is a mere 5.3% - too less to make any significant claim. However, central areas in general contribute highest per unit area due to very high tax rates as also more number of commercial centers.

None of the first 15 topmost tax yielding wards for BBMP by unit area are IT areas!

This post is about ward funds allocation, in relation to Bellandur ward.

Firstly, by virtue of Bellandur ward being so large, it seems reasonable that it deserves to get larger fund allocation, proportional to the entire sq km area. But that is not the case. It apparently gets much lesser funds than other much smaller wards, if the posts floating around in our community-devp WhatsApp grps are to be believed!

Secondly, even if one tried to justify ward funds allocation on the basis of tax-paid-per-sq-km basis, it should be borne in mind that Bellandur ward which is shown as 26.5 sq kms actually includes Bellandur lake (which BTW is much more than the blue area you see in Google Maps, all the way upto and well beyond the periphery lakeside road which are all devoid of "tax paying" habitation and any kind of habitation (and the lake itself is also devoid of habitation, obviously)) and half of Iblur camp and large swathes of land nearabout Carmelaram which are hardly inhabited by virtue of being so farflung, as you can see at the ward delineation map at https://bengaluru.citizenmatters.in/bangalore-property-tax-data-analysis-33077, and as anyone familiar with the area will recognize. These areas therefore contribute 0 property tax and they artificially lower the tax-paid-per-sq-km. Hence, it is unjust to allocate funds on the basis of tax-paid-per-sq-kms.

Its about time they did a ward delimitation and made them as small as the other wards you stated, and then did funds allocation.

So anyway, if you discount these areas, the inhabited area of Bellandur will come down to half of what is stated. More like 13 sq kms (which too is too high). Then you can see that tax-paid-per-sq-km by Bellandur residents is greater than JP Nagar! And its only going to go higher and higher as more and more multi-storey apts get populated as we speak (they're already built and waiting to get inhabited; and more are being built).I don't know why they don't enforce a halt on construction, and hasten PRR etc. Over time that will incentivize future constructions to occur there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
^^Stop quoting divisive & unsubstantiated whatsapp posts & provide proof that funds allocated are less in relation to area & services required for bellandur or any other ward, for that matter.
Your (convenient) assumptions have been proved wrong & debunked, see my response on Namma metro thread:

https://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=167443126&postcount=42933

Bellandur lake has area 3.61sqkm. Bellandur ward includes 11 lakes, not just Bellandur lake. And the combined lake area is 4.25 sqkm (or 4254612 sqm):

https://web.archive.org/web/20150926...5-7082f250d7d7

Even with lakes out, bellandur ward area is still very large - 22.2 sqkm. Removing lakes /parks /army camp areas from wards will give convoluted results. Taxes from central wards will likely zoom far higher & place Bellandur & other outer 'emerging' wards far more lower than they already are from central wards.

Further, every ward may have some lake or park or military area or all of them (in fact, most central wards do since the cantt was primarily within city). So, claiming exceptions for such features is argumentative & meaningless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
^^Stop quoting divisive & unsubstantiated whatsapp posts & provide proof that funds allocated are less in relation to area & services required for bellandur or any other ward, for that matter.
...
Bellandur lake has area 3.61sqkm. Bellandur ward includes 11 lakes, not just Bellandur lake. And the combined lake area is 4.25 sqkm
Sources for ward allocation figures:
See https://economictimes.indiatimes.co...than-a-lake/articleshow/67896798.cms?from=mdr

where it says that Bellandur contributed 5.35% of the total collection but was allocated a mere 0.04% of the BBMP budget in FY2019-20 (eventually upp'ed to 0.08%, per the more authentic site https://www.ichangemycity.com/budget-brief, which is still pathetically low).

Another link highlighting the same issue: https://bengaluru.citizenmatters.in...ur-protest-garbage-roads-infrastructure-28621


As regards the ward size, read my post about the ward size and my comments about the exact size of the lake. As I said, anyone familiar with the area and its surroundings would know what I'm talking about. If you wish to hyperventilate and debunk it without knowing, be my guest.


Further, every ward may have some lake or park or military area or all of them (in fact, most central wards do since the cantt was primarily within city).
Not true at all. The miniscule wards you stated like 0.7 sq km to 2 sq km and thereabout sized wards that rank topmost in your tax-per-sq-km table, don't have such large uninhabited spaces. Take a look at the ward delimitation map in the link I shared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
exact size of the lake
Wonder who is the one unfamiliar here - fyi I, being a Bangalorean, am very familiar with the lake & had lived in Koramangala, near the lake for 8 years in the past. Map of bellandur ward is posted below, it does not show lake areas in half of the ward as you claim.



The miniscule wards you stated like 0.7 sq km to 2 sq km and thereabout sized wards that rank topmost in your tax-per-sq-km table, don't have such large uninhabited spaces.
Really? Bellandur has 16.2% lake+park area.

Compare this with some in the top 15 high tax paying central areas:

Halsoor (ward-90) - 25.8% lake+park areas;
Vasanth nagar (ward-93) - 17.9%;
Konena Agrahara (ward-113) - 24.7%.

I have quoted only those that are above bellandur in % of lake+park areas & excluded military areas as I do not have areas of army camps. If the army areas are included, there will be lot more in the top 15 that are way over Bellandur by %, not to mention many more in the 82 that pay higher taxes by sqkm over Bellandur!

Sources for ward allocation figures
While these may scratch the surface, they do not reveal the entire picture. What you need to check is total allocation for all wards, ward by ward & then check if bellandur is given lesser. Do not use total BBMP budgeted figs like 11648.9 Crs quoted by 'Ichangemycity' since the total budget includes various heads other than public works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Do you think that strong infrastructure spending would help bail out the economy? By this I mean the "concrete" basic infrastructure that can mostly be handled by Indians domestically, whilst the architectural flare and technology can come later.

For example, India could build a semi high speed railway line without input from foreigners, but in order to design the stations or manufacture high speed trains, sometimes talent might need to be brought in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
With remote working becoming new normal, don't think Bellandur or IT areas will be anymore charming for investment. I heard there is to-let board on almost all the building in this IT region. Lots of PGs are permenently getting shut down. Huge looses are piling up for real estate owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
I hope they don't cancel the ORR Metro plans, based on the sparse ORR traffic seen nowadays! ORR Metro seems perennially jinxed! First ILFS, now Covid!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Do you think that strong infrastructure spending would help bail out the economy? By this I mean the "concrete" basic infrastructure that can mostly be handled by Indians domestically, whilst the architectural flare and technology can come later.

For example, India could build a semi high speed railway line without input from foreigners, but in order to design the stations or manufacture high speed trains, sometimes talent might need to be brought in.
They should start a separate engineering course on Railways in VTU. This will really help pick up expertise and help avoid foreign intervention in these technologies. This would be a first step towards modernizing railway sector. This will generate jobs and will help the economy. Govt should invest heavily on infrastructure to push the economy. Like connecting East port with West ports. Like mangalore Bangalore.
 
13381 - 13398 of 13398 Posts
Top