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If you were a town planner for a Bicolano community, to make your town even more successful?

  • Better road and transportation infrastructure

    Votes: 13 56.5%
  • Better power generation infrastructure

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  • Better water distribution infrastructure

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  • Improved public policy

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  • Better housing options

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  • Better food security (agriculture and farming)

    Votes: 1 4.3%
  • Better telecommunications and/or media infrastructure

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Better management of existing (or remaining) forestry and fishery areas

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  • Better social and sports facilities

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  • All of the above or other (explain)

    Votes: 9 39.1%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Bicol Region or Bicolandia is one of the 16 regions of the Philippines occupying the Bicol Peninsula at the southeastern portion of Luzon island and some other islands.

It consists of six provinces, namely, Albay, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, Masbate, and Sorsogon. It has one independent chartered city, Naga City, and six component cities, Iriga City, Legazpi City, Ligao City, Masbate City, Sorsogon City, and Tabaco City.

The inhabitants speak the Bikol language, wherein the standard language is Bikol Coastal. The commercial/financial centers and transportation hubs are Legazpi City, the Regional Center and the Gateway City to Bicolandia, and Naga City, The Heart of Bicol and The Home of Our Lady of Peñafrancia.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·


Albay is a province of the Philippines located in the Bicol Region in Luzon. Its capital is Legazpi City and the province borders the Camarines Sur to the north and Sorsogon to the south. Also to the northeast is Lagonoy Gulf leading to the Philippine Sea, and to the southwest is Burias Pass.

Mayon Volcano is the symbol most associated with the province. This nearly perfectly-shaped active volcano forms a scenic backdrop to the capital city of Legazpi 15 kilometers to the south.

People and culture

Population. Based on the May 2000 census, Albay has a total population of 1,090,907, which makes it the 22nd most populous province in the country. There are 208,640 households in the province with an average size of 5.22 persons, significantly higher than the national average of 4.99.

Languages. Bikol is the primary language spoken in Albay, being a part of the Bicol Region. There are other dialects spoken in the province, however, such as Daragueño, Legazpeño or Albayanon, Oasnon and others. The dialects spoken in the coastal areas of the province are similar to that spoken in Camarines Sur while those further inland are similar to each other but differs significantly from the coastal dialect. Majority of the inhabitants also understand Tagalog and English.

Economy

Traditional industries. Agriculture is the main industry in Albay, which produces such crops as coconut, rice, sugar, and abacá. Handicrafts is the major source of rural income. It continuous to provide fairly large share in the small-scale industries of the province. Forestry and papermaking are another source of livelihood. The manufacture of abacá products such as Manila hemp, hats, bags, mats, and slippers is one of the main sources of income in the rural areas. Fishing is also done along both shores of the province. Tourism, primarily because of Mayon Volcano, also draws income for Albay.

Heavy manufacturing industries. Of the total 6,369 manufacturing establishments of varied sizes in the Bicol Region, 48.6% are located in Albay. Bicol's largest industrial sites are in Albay: Tiwi and Manito boast geothermal energy plants, Camalig has the Goodfound Cement Factory, Daraga has its Isarog Pulp and Paper Company, Legazpi City has Bicol Hair, and Legaspi Oil Company and two other large coconut oil milling plants, making Albay top foreign currency earner this part of Luzon. [1]

Transportation. Albay is also the region's principal transshipment point with its ports: Tabaco International, Legazpi National, Pio Duran Provincial, and the Pantao Regional Port (under construction in 2003). Legazpi City also has its own domestic airport which hopes to serve international flights in the near future. Legazpi Airport serves as Bicol's gateway to Manila and the Visayas.

Geography

Political
Albay is subdivided into 15 municipalities and 3 cities. Three of them, Tiwi, Daraga, and Legazpi City are classified as 1st class cities/municipalities. Before being converted into a city in March 2001, Tabaco City used to be a first class municipality.

Cities
* Legazpi City
* Ligao City
* Tabaco City

Municipalities
* Bacacay
* Camalig
* Daraga
* Guinobatan
* Jovellar
* Libon
* Malilipot
* Malinao
* Manito
* Oas
* Pio Duran
* Polangui
* Rapu-Rapu
* Santo Domingo
* Tiwi

Physical
Albay has a total land area of 2,552.6 square kilometers, which makes it the 26th smallest province. Most of Albay is located on mainland Bicol Peninsula and it has four major islands to the east: Rapu-Rapu, Batan (part of Rapu-Rapu), Cagraray (part of Bacacay), and San Miguel (part of Tabaco City).

Lagonoy Gulf borders the province to the northeast, separating it from the province of Catanduanes. Burias Island in the province Masbate can be found to the southwest across Burias Pass.

The province is generally mountainous with scattered fertile plains and valleys. Mayon Volcano, standing at around 2460 meters, is the most famous landform in Albay, and in the whole of Bicol, in fact. This active volcano is nearly perfectly-shaped and is considered by many to be more beautiful than Mt. Fuji in Japan. Other mountains and volcanoes in the province are Catburawan, Masaraga, Malinao, and Pantao.

History

Albay and its surrounding areas were known as Ibalon when Juan de Salcedo and 120 soldiers explored it in 1573. Sawangan, a small settlement by a mangrove swamp, became a town called Albaybay (which means “by the bay”) in 1616. The town was first renamed Albay, then Legazpi, as Albay went on to refer to the province.

In 1846, the islands of Masbate, Ticao, and Burias were separated from Albay to form the comandancia of Masbate. Albay was then divided into four districts: Iraya, Cordillera or Tobaco, Sorsogon, and Catanduanes. In 1894, Sorsogon became a separate province and Catanduanes in 1945. The province of Albay itself was created on March 10, 1917.

In 1649, the natives rebelled against their recruitment to Cavite to build galleons. In 1814, Mayon Volcano erupted, killing 1,200 people and burying the town of Cagsawa. During the early 19th century, abacá hemp for shipping rope became a source of wealth.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·


Camarines Norte is a province of the Philippines located in the Bicol Region in Luzon. Its capital is Daet and the province borders Quezon to the west and Camarines Sur to the south.

Demographics

Camarines Norte has a population of 458,840, making it the 37th most populated province in the country. Bikol is the major language spoken, together with Tagalog and English.

Economy

The four major manufacturing and processing industries in the province are jewelry craft, gifts/toys/housewares, pineapple and coconut industry.

Geography

Political
Camarines Norte is subdivided into 12 municipalities.

Municipalities
* Basud
* sir fuyonan
* Daet
* Jose Panganiban
* Labo
* Mercedes
* Paracale
* San Lorenzo Ruiz (Imelda)
* San Vicente
* Santa Elena
* Talisay
* Vinzons

Physical
The province is bounded on the north by Lamon Bay and the Pacific Ocean, on the east by San Miguel Bay, on the west by Lamon Bay, and on the south by Quezon province and the adjoining province of Camarines Sur. It has a total land area of 2,200 square kilometers, which is 12.4 % of the total Bicol area and 0.73% of the total Philippine area.

History

Bicol province was established in 1573. The province of Camarines was created from Bicol in 1636. That province was divided in 1829, creating Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur. They were briefly merged from 1854 to 1857 to make Ambos Camarines (ambos is Spanish for "both"). They were merged into Ambos Camarines once again in 1893. The province was divided into Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur once again in 1917.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·


Camarines Sur is a province of the Philippines located in the Bicol Region in Luzon. Its capital is Pili and the province borders Camarines Norte and Quezon to the north, and Albay to the south. To the east lies the island province of Catanduanes across Maqueda Channel.

Camarines Sur is the largest among the six provinces in Bicol both in terms of population and land area. Naga City is the province's commercial and cultural center, boasting malls like the LCC Central Mall (a branch of Legazpi-based LCC Chain), Robertson's along Diversion Road, Nagaland E-Mall, small- to medium-sized shops, and educational institutions. Lake Buhi is where the smallest commercially-harvested fish can be found, the Sinarapan (Mistichthys luzonensis).

People and culture

Population. According to the May 2000 census, there are a total of 1,551,549 residents in Camarines Sur, making it the most populous in the region and the 15th most populous in the whole country. The same census also states that Camarines Sur has 288,172 households with an average household size of 5.37 persons, significantly higher than the national average of 4.99. The annual growth rate is 1.86%, much lower than the national growth rate of 2.36%. This rate of growth will double the population of Camarines Sur in 38 years.

Languages. Being in the Bicol Region, the main language spoken in Camarines Sur is Bikol. Filipino linguists consider the dialect of Bikol spoken around Naga City, Bicol Central (also known as Bikol Naga the purest dialect of Bikol according to Jesuit Anthropologist Frank Lynch, S.J.). Some of the other dialects spoken in the province are Buhi-non (a dialect of Bicol Albay), spoken in the southern part of the province around Lake Buhi, and Rinconada Bikol (also known as Bikol Iriga), which is used in the area around Iriga City. A dialect of Naga Bikol, called Partido is used in the eastern portion of the province around Lagonoy Gulf. Many inhabitants also understand Tagalog and English.

Economy

Agri-based, producing rice, corn, feedmeal, freshwater fish, livestock. Entrepreneurs engage in trading, often branching out towards neighboring provinces in the south as local demand might be limited, indicated by its mostly 3rd-5th income class municipalities.

Geography

Political
Camarines Sur is subdivided into 35 municipalities and 2 cities.

Cities
* Iriga City
* Naga City

Municipalities
* Baao
* Balatan
* Bato
* Bombon
* Buhi
* Bula
* Cabusao
* Calabanga
* Camaligan
* Canaman
* Caramoan
* Del Gallego
* Gainza
* Garchitorena
* Goa
* Lagonoy
* Libmanan
* Lupi
* Magarao
* Milaor
* Minalabac
* Nabua
* Ocampo
* Pamplona
* Pasacao
* Pili
* Presentacion (Parugcan)
* Ragay
* Sagñay
* San Fernando
* San Jose
* Sipocot
* Siruma
* Tigaon
* Tinambac


Physical


Terrain. Camarines Sur lies at the center of the Bicol Peninsula. The province is also the largest in the Bicol Region with a land area of 5,266.8 square kilometers. At the center of the province is Bicol Plain. Surrounding it are mountains, two of which are Mt. Isarog and Mt. Iriga. The eastern part of the province lies on the mountainous Caramoan Peninsula, which faces the island of Catanduanes to the east.

The Bicol River drains the central and southern parts of the province into San Miguel Bay. Mt. Iriga is surrounded by three lakes: Buhi, Bato, and Baao.

Climate. The climate in Camarines Sur, like most of the rest of the country, is very tropical. It is dry from March to May and wet the rest of the year. June to October marks the typhoon season. Annual average rainfall is 2,565 millimeters. Camarines Sur has an average temperature of 27.0 °C and a relative humidity of 25.8%.

History


Bicol province was established in 1573. The province of Camarines was created from Bicol in 1636. That province was divided in 1829, creating Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur. They were briefly merged from 1854 to 1857 to make Ambos Camarines (ambos is Spanish for "both"). They were merged into Ambos Camarines once again in 1893. The province was divided into Camarines Norte and Camarines Sur once again in 1917.​
 

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Congratulations, kevinb, for this new thread! You are really prolific, seems to me dai ka napapagal! :applause:

United Bicolandia is certainly a beautiful idea, thank you. Now if Bicolanos can only unite.

In politics, for example, we are so hard-up no Bicolano has risen higher than senator. Sayang nga si Roco of Naga City.

When Roco ran for President, he miserably failed because even in his home province the governor did not support him. Truly he was "the best president we never had!"

Our local politicians waste energy fighting each other. Take the GMA impeachment. On the administration side, we have Congressmen Villafuerte of Cam.Sur and Lagman of Albay leading the fray. On the opposition side, you have Congressmen Chiz Escudero of Sorsogon.

Can you imagine if these congressmen unite? Then perhaps Bicol won't be among RP's depressed regions. Especially since former Congressman Nonoy Andaya of Cam. Sur is now Budget Secretary & Congressman Joey Salceda of Albay is economic adviser of GMA.

Haaaayyyy, yan ang nakakapagal!!! :lurker:

kevinb, perhaps you also have descriptions of the other Bicol provinces such as Sorsogon, Catanduanes, & Masbate?
 

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I agree with koltuvtbm. Sorsogon, for me, is the most beautiful Bicol province I've ever visited...
 

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When I read about .... beautiful maidens,




Polangui came into my mind..... :D urban legend na lang siguro yan.
 

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Polangui actually means "Pulang Angui." It is the name of the beautiful lady who always wore a red dress during the Spanish times... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
koltuvtbm said:
kevinb, perhaps you also have descriptions of the other Bicol provinces such as Sorsogon, Catanduanes, & Masbate?
Thanks. :)
Of course I'll do that. ^^ Medyo hinugakan lang ako kasuugma kaya dai ko muna tinapos. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·


People, Culture and Arts

The people of Catanduanes are Bicolanos whose dialect indicates a strong Visayan influence. The early Spanish chroniclers noted that that the people on Catanduanes, not unlike the Visayans, also adorned their bodies with tattoos. Oral traditions also reveal folk legends that trace the earliest Catanduanons to the same group of settlers who allegedly peopled the Visayas.

As a result of geographical seclusion and vulnerability to storms, the Catanduanons have remained isolated from the rest of the Bicol region and the Philippines. This isolation in part accounts for the strength of religious institutions in the island. Nearly all the people belong to the Roman Catholic Church and religious fervor remains high. However, despite their isolation, the people of Catanduanes are also noted for their genial mien and hospitality.

Among the most notable religious observances in Catanduanes is the Kagharong. This is a reenactment of the Saint Joseph's and Virgin Mary's search for a place to stay in Bethlehem held from 16th to the 25th of December. A troupe goes from house to house and sings before the door asking for shelter. When they are refused, they move to another house. The owner of the house then shakes the hands of the leader and hands over some donation in form of money.

Trade and Investments

Catanduanes' approach to development is focused on making full use of its natural resources. The rich waters of the Pacific Ocean surround the island province. Its fishing grounds teem with herring, tuna, blue marlin, grouper, squid, lobster and mackerel.

The province also provides large quantities of forest products, specifically tropical hardwoods like almon, apitong, narra, tanguile, and red and white lauan. Although the island is mostly forested, it also produces coconuts, abaca, palay and root crops, and livestock makes up a big portion of its exports to the mainland. Significant quantities of copper, gold, iron, manganese, clay, coal, guano, phosphate, limestone, magnetite, shale and marble can be found in the island.

The Province is accessible from the Luzon mainland by air and by land-sea combination. The Virac Airport serves as air link from Manila and Legaspi. While the ports of Virac and San Andres provide the sea link with Tabasco, Albany. A system of concrete, asphalt and gravel roads encircles the main island and connects all the municipalities. Postal service and telegraph stations are the main communications links with the rest of the Country. The Balongbong Mini-Hydroelectric plant and power largest in the town of Bato provide sufficient power to the province. Portable water is reading available from wells, public faucets and local water systems.

Resource based agro-industrial development is the focus of the province. The Catanduanes Provincial Industrial Center is currently being developed to attract investors interested in abaca production and processing, marble extraction and processing ceramics manufacture and fish and food processing. The Province also holds a great potential as a tourist destination. It is leading accessed in Manila and provides an unhurried and welcoming atmosphere. The Province is still thickly forested and the coast is lined with magnificent cliffs interspersed with pockets of white sand beaches. The eastern coast is a growing destination for surfers. There are cool springs and waterfalls even in the vicinity of major population areas. Tourism is still in its infancy and tourist based ventures are still rather few. This sector can absorb more investments in establishing accommodations, resorts, diving and other recreational facilities as well as restaurants and tourist souvenir shops.

Physical Profile

Geographical Location
Catanduanes is situated in the easternmost fringes of Luzon, 13.5 to 14.0 degrees latitudes and between 123.5 to 124.0 degrees longitudes. Several islands compose the province, but majority of these physically small to be of relative significance. Its aggregate land area totals approximately 1,511.5 sq km and the coastlines which stretch to almost kilometers, are mostly embayed and cliffed.

Topography
The topography is rugged and mountainous, becoming more pronounce towards the central portion on the island. Only about 10 percent of the land area have slope gradients under 8 percent, comprised mainly by fractured and narrow strips of plains generally found near the coastal areas.

History

History, as an active ingredient of our time, conveys the message of its importance in the life of man. When we use our residence certificate and other badges of information in transactions ranging from application for a marriage license, visa, job and sale of real estate property, we become part of a public record which, in effect, threatens our privacy as citizens. The process may not be acceptable to many, but it has to be adopted as essential to life in a modern society.

Events transpire while a narrative is written everyday. Business, education and agriculture, in their course of operation, take and evaluate data. Some incidents do not hold out and it becomes necessary for us to look back to the moment as the turning point of the growth of a society. Whatever the circumstances are, there is a need for a generation to profit from the experience of the past.

The initiative to write the History of Catanduanes was perhaps the first comprehensive attempt to illustrate the growth of the province through its system of government, its ideals and aspirations, and specifically, through its leaders.

The research work which the author had conducted since 1960 yielded a massive collection of stories about Catanduanes, some of which had been chosen carefully and used to develop the total picture of the province.

The 12th largest among the more than 7,000 islands of the Philippine Archipelago, Catanduanes sports a name that sounds queer to strangers. But to the Catandunganons, the name Catanduanes is a source of pride, a symbol of unity and togetherness. The mere mention of it evokes fond memories and touches the sentimental chords of their hearts. It is a unique name that to every native of the province wherever he may be, beckons him to return to this idyllic island of his origin.

Handed down from one generation to another, told and retold with no seeming end is the tale woven around how Catanduanes acquired its name. It is a story buried them in legend, yet appears too real that it becomes difficult to separate it from fiction.

The History of Catanduanes aspires to help every Catandunganon to become familiar with the background of the province and its people. It is primarily aimed to show how this island province got the way it is.

***

The "Land of the Howling Wind", Catanduanes is an island province thrust into the Pacific Ocean. It is separated from Luzon by Maqueda Channel, across which lies the Caramoan Peninsula of Camarines Sur. Catanduanes is chiefly mountainous with few coastal plains. There is rain throughout most of the year which fall heaviest from November to January. There are no pronounced seasons but it is regularly visited by typhoons during the months between June and October.

Juan de Salcedo visited Catanduanes in 1573 after exploring Camarines. He landed at a point near Virac and was welcomed by Datu Lumibao. It was believed that Lumibao was a descendant of one of the mythic ten datus from Borneo, and the people of the island related to the Visayans. Despite early efforts to Christianize the people ofCatanduanes, the island was known as a haunt of pirates.

In 1576, ten Augustinian Missionaries perished in the treacherous seas of the island after their ship was wrecked in the vicinity of Bato.

Catanduanes was known as an early center of Shipbuilding during the early Spanish period and it is believed that its name is derived from the Catandungan River, along whose banks tando trees used extensively for shipbuilding were found.

Being largely isolated from the rest of Bicol, Catanduanes was particularly vulnerable to Moro attacks. In 1755, Catanduanes was overran by the raiders who pillaged and burned the towns of Virac and Calolbon, Luyang Cave, in San Antonio, is the mass grave of islanders who were massacred in that raid. The island continued to be vulnerable to raiding until the mid-19th century.

Catanduanes was placed under the jurisdiction of Albay after Bicol was divided into two in the 17th century. It remained part of the province until 1945. On October 26 through Commonwealth Act No. 687, Catanduanes was separated from Albay and became an independent province.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·


THE ISLAND PROVINCE OF MASBATE

The Province of Masbate lies at the center of the Philippine Archipelago between latitudes 11 degrees 43 minutes north and 21 degrees 36 minutes north, 123 degrees 9 minutes east and 124 degrees 15 minutes east. It is composed of a wedge-shaped mainland (Masbate), two major islands (Ticao and Burias) and 14 small islands. It is bounded on the north by the Bicol Mainland, on the south by the Visayan Sea, on the west by Sibuyan Sea and on the east by the Burias Pass, Ticao Pass and Samar Sea.

The province covers a total land area of 4,047.7 square kilometers. It is politically subdivided into three congressional districts, 20 municipalities, one city and 550 barangays. Masbate had a population of 707,668 as of the 2000 census, growing at an average rate of 1.71 percent from 1995 to 2000. The province had an average population density of 174.8 persons per square kilometer.

Masbate is the biggest cattle raising province in the region. Its main economic activity is agriculture with copra, rice, corn and tobacco as its main products. Fishing is also a major industry in the province. Until lately, the province is the site of the biggest gold mining operation in the region. Other minerals found in the island province are manganese and limestone.

Due to its geographic location, Masbate is a melting pot of dialects and cultures. Residents in the capital town of Masbate speak the native Masbateño with a mixture of the Bicol dialect; natives of Cataingan, Palanas, and Dimasalang along its east coast use Samar-Visayan; residents from Pio V. Corpus, Cataingan and Placer in the south speak Bohol and Cebu Visayan; along the western coast of Mandaon and Balud, people converse in Ilongo and Capiceño; natives of the Burias island talk in variants of the Bicol dialect and Visayan due mainly to the droves of migrants to the island during the sixties.

GENERAL INFORMATION

The islands of Masbate were formed out of volcanic rocks over one hundred million years ago.

Many millions of years later, humans made their appearance in the tropical regions of the earth. They lived on wild animals, plants, and fruits. They made tools of stone, bone, and wood. Some of these very early stone tools and bones have been found in Masbate.

Village settling grew from the development of farming; pottery flourished, stone tools were improved and the early Masbate farmers made axes of polished stones. Many stone axes of this kind have been found in Masbate. They are the remains of the first farmers who used the axes to cut down trees. The early farmers also made beautiful ornaments of shells. They buried their dead in burial caves and jars. Two large caves in Masbate, the Bat-ongan Cave in Mandaon and the Kalanay Cave in Aroroy are known worldwide as burial caves.

About four hundred years B.C., iron and glass as well as woven cloth appeared in Masbate. The stone tools gradually disappeared; agriculture improved. Beautiful decorated pottery were produced. Unearthed fragments of porcelain tell of the brisk trade that existed with China.

HISTORY

When Captain Luis Enriquez de Guzman anchored on the shores of Masbate in 1569, he found tiny settlements spread along the coasts engaged in flourishing trade with China. Chinese traders visited Masbate and founded small settlements during the Shri-Vijayan and Madjapahit periods. Ruins of cave-like dwellings resembling “kiva” (possibly built by Indians who accompanied the Chinese traders), were found along the coasts of Aroroy, Palanas, and Masbate. Porcelain jars dating back to the 10th century were excavated at Kalanay (Aroroy) in the 1930s.

Historical accounts show that the Christianization of the Bicol Region actually began in Masbate in 1569:
Father Alonso Jimenez was the first missionary to the islands of Masbate, Burias, Leyte, and Samar. Then he went to Ibalon (Bicol) in the provinces of Camarines, where he resided many years, and made many religious incursions into Albay and Sorsogon. Fray Jimenez is considered the apostle of the island of Masbate.

In December 1600, Dutch Commander Admiral Oliver van Noorth, sought refuge at San Jacinto Harbor after his fleet lost to the Spanish Armada in Manila. He was later engaged in a fierce clash with Limahong’s fleet at Canlibas-Matabao passage.

At the height of the Galleon Trade, Mobo contributed first class lumber for the construction of galleons, making it the center of trade in the province and was the capital of the province in the early part of the Spanish occupation.

In 1864, Masbate was declared a separate province from Albay. Guiom was made the capital while Ticao became a commandancia-politico-militar. Shortly before the declaration of Philippine independence by President Emilio Aguinaldo, the town of Masbate was established as the provincial capital.

The Americans came to Masbate in 1900 to extend their pacification campaign. In December 1908, Masbate was annexed to the province of Sorsogon. A bill declaring Masbate as independent province was approved on February 1, 1922.

As early as 1906, the Masbate representative made the proposal to the United States Congress to grant the Philippines her independence.

The first Japanese elements arrived in Masbate the dawn of January 7, 1942 from Legazpi. They landed in several places without facing opposition- the province was too stunned to mount any resistance.​
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·


Sorsogon
occupies the southernmost tip of the Bicol Region. The province is virtually enclosed by water except at the northern portion adjoining Albay. Sorsogon Bay nearly cuts the province in half, leaving a narrow offshoot of land where the municipality of Sorsogon, the capital of the province, is situated. San Bernardino Strait, which links the Pacific Ocean to Ticao and Burias pass, separates Sorsogon from the island of Samar.

People and culture

Festivals

Most of the inhabitants of the province belong to the ethnolinguistic Bicolano and Bisakol groups. Sorsogueños are very religious and funloving. Being mostly Roman Catholics, they are active in every festivity celebrated throughout the year. For instance, like any other Filipino ethnolinguistic groups, they celebrate the fiesta of the Patron Saints Peter and Paul in Sorsogon city every June. Also, by the last week of October, the Kasangayahan festival is celebrated in the whole province. At the midst of the latter festivity, myriads of botanical shows, and painting are conducted. Most of the people will hang out in carnivals and concerts. Another occasion is the Pili festival, which includes street dancing by locals donning Pili nut costumes, cooking competitions, fireworks displays, and even a nutcracking session along the road by the locals. Every barangay has its own fiesta and Patron saint which are highlighted by yearly buffet feast in every Sorsogueño home.

During the Holy Week season (celebrated as early as week of March or 1st week of April), people flock to the Saints Peter and Paul cathedral and start the procession with carts bearing statues of Jesus Christ on his way to crucifixion.

Minorities
Minorities in the province include Muslim immigrants from Mindanao, who engage in street vending and small shop businesses. Their mosque is situated inside Sitio Bolangan on the outskirts of the city. There is also a significant small Chinese population who are mostly owners of hardware stores and commodity shops (some of whom have intermarried with the natives) and dwell in the business center. Indian (called "Bumbay") communities are also present. They engage in money lending businesses--coloquially called "five-six".

Education and language
Education is highly valued as an investment for the future, attested by state and private schools and colleges which dot the province. Almost all people understand Tagalog and Bicolano. The local language spoken by Sorsogueños varies from district to municipalities. To illusrate, the form of Bisakol (called Waray Sorsogon) spoken in Barcelona, Gubat, Irosin, Sta. Magdalena, Matnog and Bulusan slightly differs from the form (called Masbate Sorsogon) spoken in the city of Sorsogon and the municipalities of Magallanes, Juban and Casiguran. North of Sorsogon City, in Castilla, Pilar, Donsol, and Bacon (merged with Sorsogon city; see History), a form of Bikol is spoken. The former municipalities mentioned use words and intonations from Visayan languages such as Waray-Waray, Cebuano and Ilonggo, and Bisakol is considered a Warayan language like Waray-Waray of Samar and Leyte. The latter is similar to the Bikol spoken by Darageños and Legaspiños in Albay province. English is also understood by everyone, with the exception of illiterates. It is used in all government documents, schools, and businesses. This language has also become increasingly important as businesses such as call centers, and medical transcription demands prospective applicants knowledgeable in this language.

History

When the Spanish conquistador, Miguel Lopez de Legazpi, who was then based in Panay Island in the Visayas, dispatched, sometime between 1565 to 1570, to this part of the islands an expeditionary force headed by Capitan Luis Enriquez de Guzman, together with their chaplain, the Augustinian friar, Fray Alonso Jimenez, primarily to gather provisions for the starving Spanish force in Panay, and at the same time, evangelize whatever native villages they might come upon in the course of their foray, the group stumbled upon a small fishing village at the mouth of the Ginangra River, in what is now the Municipality of Magallanes.

This was the village of Gibalong, the very first Christian settlement in the island of Luzon. It was here where the first mass in Luzon was celebrated by the Augustinian friar, Fray Alonso Jimenez.

Thus, the name Ibalong, to refer to the whole of Bikol Region, really came from this small fishing village, Gibalong, which is now a mere sitio of Barangay Siuton, in Magallanes town, where the local parish constructed sometime in the 1970s a small wooden chapel and a concrete historical marker on the site. In some old Spanish maps, the Spanish cartographers even retained the original spelling by identifying, either the whole Bikol Region or parts of it – Tierra de Gibalong. In his book, From Ibalon to Sorsogon: A Historical Survey of Sorsogon Province to 1905 (New Day Pub. QC, Philippines, 1991), Dr. Luis C. Dery writes, “Historical records showed that the Spaniards started using the name Ibalon as early as 1567 to refer variously to a pre-Spanish native settlement in Sorsogon Gulf, to the entire Bicol Region, and sometimes to the entire island of Luzon. The Spaniards’ indiscriminate use of this name was due to their inadequate knowledge of Bicol geography at the outset of their exploration and conquest of the region. Gradually, they were able to delimit Ibalon and the rest of Kabikolan’s territory.”

Sorsogon became a province, separate from the Province of Albay to which it was formerly attached, in 1894. This is the reason why, in 1994 the centennial foundation anniversary of the Province started to be commemorated and celebrated with a festival – the Kasanggayahan Festival – every October of each year.

How Sorsogon got to be Sorsogon?
The name Sorsogon was originally spelled “solsogon” in most old Spanish maps. Solsogon is an old Bikol word, meaning, “to trace a river going upstream”. The rootword “solsog” is Bikol for “going against the current”. It is also variously pronounced and spelled as “sogsogon” or “sosogon”, which all really mean the same thing – “to trace a river, a trail, or a pathway”.

As the old folks story goes, after establishing a settlement in Gibalong, in what is now the town of Magallanes, the Spaniards fanned out to explore the area and one group soon came upon a small river emptying itself into what is now Sorsogon Bay. Tired and lost and not knowing where they were, the Spaniards asked a native about the name of the place. Ignorant of the Iberian tongue, and fearful of the white men with the funny hats and bushy countenances, the native, thinking that the strangers were asking for directions, simply pointed at the river and said, “Solsogon”, meaning, trace the river upstream to a native village beyond. And the name stuck.

From Solsogon to Sorsogon. The people of Sorsogon invites everyone, from whichever corner of the world they are, to trace the path towards the beautiful and most hospitable Province of Sorsogon.

Geography

Sorsogon, at the southeastern part of the Bicol Peninsula, is bounded on the north by the province of Albay, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the San Bernardino Strait, and on the west and northwest by the Ticao and Burias Passes. It has a total land area of 2,141.4 sq. kms.

It is characterized by an irregularly topography, except for landlocked Irosin, all the towns lie along the coast. They are all connected by concrete and asphalt roads. Mountains sprawl over the northeast, southeast and west portions. Mt. Bulusan, the tallest peak rises 1,560 meters above sea level.

Except for its overland link with the province of Albay to the north, it is completely surrounded by water. Sorsogon is the gateway of Luzon to the Visayas and Mindanao through its roll-on, roll-off ferry terminal facilities located in the municipalities of Matnog and Bulan.

It has a total of 15 municipalities which are politically subdivided into 2 districts, namely: first district - Sorsogon, Pilar, Donsol, Castilla, Bacon, Casiguran and Magallanes; second district - Barcelona, Prieto Diaz, Juban, Gubat, Bulusan, Irosin, Sta. Magdalena and Bulan.

Sorsogon City was created (infusing municipalities of Sorsogon and Bacon) respectively.

Major Industries

The major crops are abaca and coconut. The province boasts of producing the best hemp in the Bicol Region.;

Fishing industry ranks next. Freshwater and offshore fishing resources are not yet fully developed.

They are plenty of raw materials for cottage industries. It has untouched deposits of sulfur, kaolin, limestone and coal.​
 

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kevinb said:


Sorsogon
occupies the southernmost tip of the Bicol Region. The province is virtually enclosed by water except at the northern portion adjoining Albay. Sorsogon Bay nearly cuts the province in half, leaving a narrow offshoot of land where the municipality of Sorsogon, the capital of the province, is situated. San Bernardino Strait, which links the Pacific Ocean to Ticao and Burias pass, separates Sorsogon from the island of Samar.


Education and language
Education is highly valued as an investment for the future, attested by state and private schools and colleges which dot the province. Almost all people understand Tagalog and Bicolano. The local language spoken by Sorsogueños varies from district to municipalities. To illusrate, the form of Bisakol (called Waray Sorsogon) spoken in Barcelona, Gubat, Irosin, Sta. Magdalena, Matnog and Bulusan slightly differs from the form (called Masbate Sorsogon) spoken in the city of Sorsogon and the municipalities of Magallanes, Juban and Casiguran. North of Sorsogon City, in Castilla, Pilar, Donsol, and Bacon (merged with Sorsogon city; see History), a form of Bikol is spoken. The former municipalities mentioned use words and intonations from Visayan languages such as Waray-Waray, Cebuano and Ilonggo, and Bisakol is considered a Warayan language like Waray-Waray of Samar and Leyte. The latter is similar to the Bikol spoken by Darageños and Legaspiños in Albay province. English is also understood by everyone, with the exception of illiterates. It is used in all government documents, schools, and businesses. This language has also become increasingly important as businesses such as call centers, and medical transcription demands prospective applicants knowledgeable in this language.



Bicol is undeniably the most diverse language in the Philippines...​
 

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The inhabitants speak the Bikol language, wherein the standard language is Bikol Coastal. The commercial/financial centers and transportation hubs are Legazpi City, the Regional Center and the Gateway City to Bicolandia, and Naga City, The Heart of Bicol and The Home of Our Lady of Peñafrancia.​
In Camarines Norte, 60% of the people speak Tagalog.
 

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^^ oo nga. dun galing tatay ko e sa talisay malapit sa daet. halos tagalog yung salita dun pero marami rin ang marunong mag-bikolano
 

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Camarines Norte, Catanduanes, Masbate, and Sorsogon Provinces

Sorsogon is a province of the Philippines located in the Bicol Region in Luzon. Its capital is Sorsogon City and borders the province of Albay to the north. Sorsogon is at the tip of the Bicol Peninsula and faces the island of Samar to the southeast across the San Bernardino Strait


Festivals
Most of the inhabitants of the province belong to the ethnolinguistic Bicolano and Bisakol groups. Sorsogon was once a part of Albay and once also included Masbate. Sorsogueños are very religious and funloving. Being mostly Roman Catholics, they are active in every festivity celebrated throughout the year. For instance, like any other Filipino ethnolinguistic groups, they celebrate the fiesta of the Patron Saints Peter and Paul in Sorsogon city every June. Also, by the last week of October, the Kasangayahan festival is celebrated in the whole province. At the midst of the latter festivity, myriads of botanical shows, and painting are conducted. Most of the people will hang out in carnivals and concerts. Another occasion is the Pili festival, which includes street dancing by locals donning Pili nut costumes, cooking competitions, fireworks displays, and even a nutcracking session along the road by the locals. Every barangay has its own fiesta and Patron saint which are highlighted by yearly buffet feast in every Sorsogueño home.

During the Holy Week season (celebrated as early as week of March or 1st week of April), people flock to the Saints Peter and Paul cathedral and start the procession with carts bearing statues of Jesus Christ on his way to crucifixion.

[edit]
Minorities
Minorities in the province include Muslim immigrants from Mindanao, who engage in street vending and small shop businesses. Their mosque is situated inside Sitio Bolangan on the outskirts of the city. There is also a significant small Chinese population who are mostly owners of hardware stores and commodity shops (some of whom have intermarried with the natives) and dwell in the business center. Indian (called "Bumbay") communities are also present. They engage in money lending businesses--coloquially called "five-six".

[edit]
Education and language
Education is highly valued as an investment for the future, attested by state and private schools and colleges which dot the province. Almost all people understand Tagalog and Bicolano. The local language spoken by Sorsogueños varies from district to municipalities. To illusrate, the form of Bisakol (called Waray Sorsogon) spoken in Barcelona, Gubat, Irosin, Sta. Magdalena, Matnog and Bulusan slightly differs from the form (called Masbate Sorsogon) spoken in the city of Sorsogon and the municipalities of Magallanes, Juban and Casiguran. North of Sorsogon City, in Castilla, Pilar, Donsol, and Bacon (merged with Sorsogon city; see History), a form of Bikol is spoken. The former municipalities mentioned use words and intonations from Visayan languages such as Waray-Waray, Cebuano and Ilonggo, and Bisakol is considered a Warayan language like Waray-Waray of Samar and Leyte. The latter is similar to the Bikol spoken by Darageños and Legaspiños in Albay province. English is also understood by everyone, with the exception of illiterates. It is used in all government documents, schools, and businesses. This language has also become increasingly important as businesses such as call centers, and medical transcription demands prospective applicants knowledgeable in this language.

POLITICAL:


City
Sorsogon City
[edit]
Municipalities
Barcelona
Bulan
Bulusan
Casiguran
Castilla
Donsol
Gubat
Irosin
Juban
Magallanes
Matnog
Pilar
Prieto Diaz
Santa Magdalena
 

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Sorsogon - Bicol's Whaleshark Paradise
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
Sorsogon is situated at the southernmost tip of Luzon. As a part of the gateway to the Visayas and Mindanao, the province is a melting pot of cultures and influences. From its earliest days as a trading post frequented by Chinese and Malay merchants, Sorsogon has evolved into a center of trade and commerce in the Bicol Region.

Sorsogon offers the visitor a wide variety of diversions from scuba diving to snorkeling, sport fishing, swimming, boating, island hopping, mountain climbing, biking, hiking, spelunking, or just simply touching base with nature. The tourist, too, can revel in Sorsogon’s pageantry and celebration during its numerous festivals and fiestas, and experience its rich cultural heritage.

In Sorsogon, you will never run out of things to do, sights to see, places to explore, folk celebrations to join and enjoy. This is Sorsogon, the Land of Kasaggayahan – a land of peace and serenity, and happy, hospitable people.
Geography
The province of Sorsogon on the north extends westward from 124° to 123° longitude and on the north-south axis from 120° to 130° north latitude. Forming a triangle shape, it is bounded on the north by the province of Albay and Albay Gulf, on the south by Samar and San Bernardino strait; on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the west by Burias Island and Ticao Pass.
Political Subdivision
The ratification on December 16, 2000 of Republic Act 8806, which merges the towns of Bacon and Sorsogon and converting them into Sorsogon City, reduced the composition of the province into 14 municipalities and one component city. Sorsogon City serves as the capital. The province has 541 barangays and two congressional districts.
Population The NSO Survey of Population in 2000 shows that Sorsogon has a total population of 650,535.
Language/Dialects

The Bicol dialect is spoken in the province, being at the gateway between the Visayas and Luzon through the Bicol Region. Sorsogon’s brand of Bicol, however, is a unique mixture of the Visayas and Bicol dialects. Most of the natives can speak English and Filipino fluently.
Climate
Generally, the climate is pleasant the whole year round with only two pronounced seasons: rainy from July to December and dry from January to June.
Major Industries

Sorsogon is rich in natural resources but many of them remain undeveloped. The major crops are abaca and copra. The province boasts of producing the best hemp in the Bicol Region. Its fishing industry ranks next. Freshwater and offshore fishing resources are not yet fully developed. There are plenty of raw materials for cottage industries. The province has untouched deposits of sulfur, kaolin, limestone, and coal
 
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