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Vienna has the citybike sharing program. There is a solid network of currently 95 sharing stations, located within the inner districts and beyond in most of the dense neighbourhoods. You need a Maestro Card, VISA, Mastercard or JCB credit card and have to register once, either online or directly at the sharing station.

The first hour is for free (whereas you have to wait 15 min after giving it back to get another free hour). Oh and there are of course no system closures, you can take a ride any time of the day any day you like.

There exists a constantly updated internet map (as well as a smart phone app) on the station statuses:

http://www.citybikewien.at/main.php?lang_id=1&content_id=1000151




http://www.alleswerbung.at/en/press...usiness/2633-voll-im-trend-citybike-wien.html


Vienna had a totally free system before it introduced the current one. Frankly said, it did not work out at all as bikes were stolen, damaged and never found again. The current system is more sophisticated and a tad more complicated but works really well and is easier than getting cash from an ATM in the US ;). It also proved to be a great addition to the subway network.
 

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Hi! I want to ask if someone know where there is a list of bike sharing programs in different lists.
I only found one in wikipedia, but is not very reliable (some numbers are old, anothers are news...) and is strange to see how few messages about bike sharing systems are in SSC.

However, and for ot doing offtopic, my city (Sevilla) has, since 2007, the system Sevici (www.sevici.es), which is the third largest in Spain (after Barcelona and Valencia) but probably the first in proportion with the population. It is still creating more stations and adding more bycicles, now has 260 stations.


The cost has grown in the last times: until 2010 was 10€ the year, now is 30,76€.
There is also the option for using one week by paying 12,30€.
Like in many other places if you don't use one bycicle more than 30 minutes in a time, there's not overcost. Also, if you want to park the bycicle but the station is full, you have 15 more free minutes.


There is also a mobile application and a place in the official website for knowing the quantity of bycicles and free spaces in each station right in this moment.
 

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Oslo got a bike sharing program called Bysykler in Norwegain or City Bikes in English. It's financed by a combination of user fees and commercials on the bike and the stations. A subscription currently cost 12,72 EUR (100NOK) for a ordinary validation car and 17,17 EUR (135NOK) for mobile phone validation.

Here is a map over the current locations of the stations. The map is also updated with how many bicycles there are available at each given time.
http://www.bysykler.no/oslo/kart-over-sykkelstativer

I could not find any concrete numbers of the amount locations, but they provide a pretty good coverage of the inner city.


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bicycles_in_Oslo.jpg


There are also similar systems in Drammen and Trondheim in Norway.
 

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Chicago rolled out "Divvy" about a month ago. They quickly opened 117 bike stalls which immediately pushed it to the 4th largest bike sharing system in the country and one of the busiest in the world. Within two weeks around 3,100 people registered as users and 14,000 more as 24-hour passes, and within its first few weeks it already obtained the same registration as Washington DC had after its first year. In the first 20 days the system logged 50,000 rides, with 6,000 rides taken just last Saturday/Sunday alone. Another 40 stations are opening up in the next week.

The city has now added one red bike to go along with the thousands of blue bikes. People who shoot videos or pictures of themselves on the one red bike can sign up for prizes to be drawn from time to time and by next spring the city plans to have over 400 stalls with over 4,000 bikes, making it the largest in the country.

Chicago has long been one of the top bicycle cities in the country due to its straight roads and very flat topography, plus having two mayors now who are extremely avid bike fans.

In the last year the city has now added 30 miles of protected bike lanes, and now represents over 20% of the protected lanes in the country (from 0% last year). The lanes push the parked cars out into the street, and have painted and barrier separated lanes just for bikes. One major through-street in the financial district had a lane taken away this spring and there is now a 2-way bikeway running the length of downtown with its own traffic markings and traffic lights.
 

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Nice Ride is the bike sharing system in Minneapolis, it has 170 stations. Minneapolis has the most developed biking infrastructure in the US so the bike sharing system is fairly heavily used.

 

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Chicago is now over 150,000 rides taken within the first 6 weeks of the bike sharing program. It's far surpassed expectations and I'm amazed at the dozens of the blue bikes I see zooming all over the downtown area.

The program is still less than 50% implemented -although dozens of new stations are being installed every week or two. 69 stations at first, then up to 100 a few weeks later and now up to 157 stations with 1,500 bikes. 400 stations next spring. I saw the first one pop up outside my house on the north side. The issue now is that bikes are running out very early in the afternoon rush hour at some points downtown because so many people are now using the bikes in their daily commute.

The usage really peaks on the weekends.

rough number of rentals for the opening and the most recent weekend:
1st: 3,500
7th: 15,000

Riders have already logged more than 458,000 miles.
 

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Brussels, Belgium, also has a bike sharing program called "Villo!".
The system started in 2006 by the name of Cyclocity and was only limited to the city centre (the historic town). But due to the limited scope of the network it wasn't very succesfull.
In 2009 it was relaunched as Villo! and the network was expanded outside the city centre.
Today the network consists of 205 stations and counts over 2500 bikes. More than 27.000 people have a yearly subsription. By the end of the full deployment it should have 300 stations and over 5000 bikes.



I use it myself pretty frequently and I must say it's a very handy system. The downside though is that Brussels isn't really made for cycling. The dozens of cobble stone streets, the lack of bicycle lanes and the fact that the city is build on a slope (imagine riding on cobble stones going uphill :s) doesn't make the ride really comfortable.
 

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I would like to know something (maybe in Chicago is this), is there any bike sharing programs in the world that belongs to more than one city?

In mine, Seville, the bike sharing program only can be used inside the city, which is a big deal, because a lot of people from the metropolitan area that have to go to the city everyday can't take one from their houses.
The bigger reason for that is that the city hall of Seville is the one who subsidizing it and here in Spain any politician want to unify services between different cities.

However, is there any zone in the world with more than one city sharing the same "bike sharing program"? It would be a great progress, and maybe easy to do considering than in Europe most of this systems are made by the same company (JCDecaux)
 

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Bay Area Bike Share is a regional pilot project being implemented from 29 August by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), in collaboration with the following:

- City and County of San Francisco (with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation District, the operator of Muni);
- County of San Mateo and Redwood City; and
- County of Santa Clara, with the cities of Mountain View, Palo Alto, and San Jose.

Here are some images of bike racks now in place for the program launch in Redwood City: this location is at the County Center.


DSC04929 by anthonynachor, on Flickr


DSC04928 by anthonynachor, on Flickr


DSC04926 by anthonynachor, on Flickr


DSC04927 by anthonynachor, on Flickr


DSC04924 by anthonynachor, on Flickr


DSC04923 by anthonynachor, on Flickr

Other pickup locations include:

- Sequoia Station (Redwood City Caltrain)
- Redwood City Library
 
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Hey fieldsofdreams, congratz on becoming a mod! Well deserved ;)
Thanks a lot! :hug: I'm pretty surprised you posted that here, but it's all good with me.

As for the bike sharing story, hmmm... I then wonder if such shared bikes can be placed on board bike racks on buses or light rail?
 

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I wonder if the growing popularity of cycling in Western cities is a long term thing which will fundamentally change how cities work or is it merely a trend.
 

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I wonder if the growing popularity of cycling in Western cities is a long term thing which will fundamentally change how cities work or is it merely a trend.
In many cities of Europe (out of Netherlands and Belgium, where it has always been popular) I'm pretty sure is a long term thing
 

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I wonder if the growing popularity of cycling in Western cities is a long term thing which will fundamentally change how cities work or is it merely a trend.
I believe it will become a long-term, sustainable trend that can change cities for the better because it will not only reduce dependence on automobiles and fuel, but it will also allow residents and employers have choices on how to get to and from work, school, and leisure (not to mention the health benefits of cycling too on one's overall health). The biggest drawback to make cycling a mainstream trend in most Western cities would be the infrastructure needed to bring it up to par with demand.
 
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