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Hello - I thought that people here might be interested in a mini-site I put together a few weeks ago about some of Frank Graham's books:
Frank Graham’s North

Good stuff Matthew Kilburn. We have discussed Frank Graham and his books a few times here on the forum, mostly on this "Books Thread".

Here (in an extract from our INDEX) is a list of 'links' to those discussions . . .

FRANK GRAHAM - NEWCASTLE AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER.
Assorted lists of Frank Graham Books (SSC posters, together, attempting to 'build up' a Bibliography)
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Bibliography 1958-1991: A complete list of books published by Frank Graham - A BOOK by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Frank Graham Complete February 1978 Stock List (Local books only)
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Frank Graham - His Life Story
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Maps of Newcastle - A BOOK compiled (and published) by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
The Castle and Walls of Newcastle - A BOOK by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Old Inns & Taverns of Durham & Northumberland - A BOOK by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Famous Northumbrian Women - A BOOK by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
Newcastle 900 - A BOOK by Frank Graham
BOOKS - about Newcastle and the North East
 

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Crime pays for Newcastle author whose book is in line for top prize
ChronicleLIVE, 11th September 2020

The Man on the Street - A book by Trevor Wood.jpg

Image from 'Amazon.co.uk' NOT from the Newspaper Article.


A Newcastle writer is in line for a top prize for his debut crime novel. 'The Man on The Street' by Trevor Wood has been shortlisted for the 2020 CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger, awarded to the best crime novel by a first-time author of any nationality first published in the UK in English. Organised by the Crime Writers Association as part of its prestigious Dagger Awards, previous winners have included Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn and international best-seller Patricia Cornwell. This year's winner will be revealed on October 22nd.

Trevor, who lives in the Sandyford area of Newcastle, said: “The Crime Writer’s Association’s Dagger awards are definitely the most sought after prizes in the crime-writing community and the John Creasey (First Blood) award is one of the most prestigious of those awards as it’s given to the best crime novel by a debut author. There are so many crime books written by first time writers that to have yours voted as the best of the bunch is so unlikely that it doesn’t really feel real."

The Man on the Street is set in Newcastle whose main character is homeless veteran Jimmy Mullen struggling with PTSD who helps a young woman who reminds him of his estranged daughter track down the killer of her father. Despite being released around the time the country went into lockdown because of the coronavirus crisis, this hasn’t stopped it becoming one of the most talked about crime books of 2020. The film rights for it have already been snapped up by the makers of Line of Duty while it was also longlisted for the Guardian’s ‘Not The Booker Prize’ award, with entries nominated by the public.

The paperback is out this week and will be followed soon by a sequel. Called One Way Street, it will be out in e-book and audio book on October 29 and will be available to buy in book shops next March. Trevor is currently working on the third book in the series, currently titled Dead End Street.

Read More - Crime pays for Newcastle author whose book is in line for top prize
 

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A Northumbria PhD thesis by John Griffiths "Mr Newcastle: the career of T Dan Smith" has recently been published. From the abstract

"It shows the origins of the 1963 redevelopment plan for Newcastle were strongly influenced by the 1955 plan for Fort Worth, Texas. It demonstrates the extent of Smith’s efforts to reform urban administration in Newcastle to make fulfilment of his ideas possible. It shows in detail how Smith’s ambitions for Peterlee came close to success in its designation as Britain’s first government-recognised ‘science campus’. It demonstrates how several of the criminal charges laid against Smith in 1973 show major flaws. These findings are important in illuminating a number of areas. They offer a new perspective on the history of the wartime Trotskyist movement. They cast new light on the impact of revisionism in the postwar Labour Party. They contribute to the history of 20th century urban redevelopment by identifying the intellectual origins of the influential Newcastle plan. The findings on Peterlee provide a case study of science policy in a postwar new town. The examination of the criminal charges casts doubt on the stereotyped portrayal of Smith as a ‘corrupt city boss’. Overall, the research shows Smith to be an influential and innovative if highly controversial politician whose career offers fresh perspectives on local government, regional policy, and the postwar Labour Party."

It's lengthy, but very interesting reading and might be of interest to forum members. It is freely available online at

Mr Newcastle: the career of T Dan Smith - Northumbria Research Link
 

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A Northumbria PhD thesis by John Griffiths "Mr Newcastle: the career of T Dan Smith" has recently been published. From the abstract

"It shows the origins of the 1963 redevelopment plan for Newcastle were strongly influenced by the 1955 plan for Fort Worth, Texas. It demonstrates the extent of Smith’s efforts to reform urban administration in Newcastle to make fulfilment of his ideas possible. It shows in detail how Smith’s ambitions for Peterlee came close to success in its designation as Britain’s first government-recognised ‘science campus’. It demonstrates how several of the criminal charges laid against Smith in 1973 show major flaws. These findings are important in illuminating a number of areas. They offer a new perspective on the history of the wartime Trotskyist movement. They cast new light on the impact of revisionism in the postwar Labour Party. They contribute to the history of 20th century urban redevelopment by identifying the intellectual origins of the influential Newcastle plan. The findings on Peterlee provide a case study of science policy in a postwar new town. The examination of the criminal charges casts doubt on the stereotyped portrayal of Smith as a ‘corrupt city boss’. Overall, the research shows Smith to be an influential and innovative if highly controversial politician whose career offers fresh perspectives on local government, regional policy, and the postwar Labour Party."

It's lengthy, but very interesting reading and might be of interest to forum members. It is freely available online at

Mr Newcastle: the career of T Dan Smith - Northumbria Research Link
Thanks for this. My late father came to know him after his 'troubles'. Just about to make a start on it.
 

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Crime pays for Newcastle author whose book is in line for top prize
ChronicleLIVE, 11th September 2020

View attachment 502890
Image from 'Amazon.co.uk' NOT from the Newspaper Article.


A Newcastle writer is in line for a top prize for his debut crime novel. 'The Man on The Street' by Trevor Wood has been shortlisted for the 2020 CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger, awarded to the best crime novel by a first-time author of any nationality first published in the UK in English. Organised by the Crime Writers Association as part of its prestigious Dagger Awards, previous winners have included Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn and international best-seller Patricia Cornwell. This year's winner will be revealed on October 22nd.

Trevor, who lives in the Sandyford area of Newcastle, said: “The Crime Writer’s Association’s Dagger awards are definitely the most sought after prizes in the crime-writing community and the John Creasey (First Blood) award is one of the most prestigious of those awards as it’s given to the best crime novel by a debut author. There are so many crime books written by first time writers that to have yours voted as the best of the bunch is so unlikely that it doesn’t really feel real."

The Man on the Street is set in Newcastle whose main character is homeless veteran Jimmy Mullen struggling with PTSD who helps a young woman who reminds him of his estranged daughter track down the killer of her father. Despite being released around the time the country went into lockdown because of the coronavirus crisis, this hasn’t stopped it becoming one of the most talked about crime books of 2020. The film rights for it have already been snapped up by the makers of Line of Duty while it was also longlisted for the Guardian’s ‘Not The Booker Prize’ award, with entries nominated by the public.

The paperback is out this week and will be followed soon by a sequel. Called One Way Street, it will be out in e-book and audio book on October 29 and will be available to buy in book shops next March. Trevor is currently working on the third book in the series, currently titled Dead End Street.

Read More - Crime pays for Newcastle author whose book is in line for top prize

One Way Street.
A second book by Trevor Wood

525467


The second gritty Newcastle-set thriller in this unforgettable series about a homeless veteran turned local sleuth and vigilante. Follow up to the highly acclaimed The Man on the Street - 'Fresh, original, authentic and gritty' (LEE CHILD)

'Jimmy is a character you root for from page one ... simply superb' - M.W. CRAVEN, winner of the CWA Gold Dagger, on The Man on the Street

A series of bizarre drug-related deaths among runaway teenagers has set the North East's homeless community on edge.


One Way Street sees the welcome return of Jimmy Mullen, the homeless, PTSD-suffering, veteran as he attempts to rebuild his life following the events in The Man on the Street. As his probation officer constantly reminds him: all he needs to do is keep out of trouble.

But then one of Jimmy's friends asks for help. Someone this friend was close to but has lost touch with is found dead in a dumpster, yet another victim of Newcastle's drug culture. Jimmy knows he shouldn't get involved but loyalty compels him to try to find out what's really going on.

Sadly for him, trouble just seems to have a habit of tracking Jimmy down.
 
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