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De Inktpot (The Inkwel) Build in the late 1910's and early 20's is the Headquarters of the dutch national rail services. It is located in my home town (Utrecht) and is the largest brick building in the country.

fantastic!

Technical Administration Building of Hoechst AG, Frankfurt, Germany (1924)
Architect: Peter Behrens



wow!



St. Martin's Garrison Church in Delhi, India
by Arthur Shoosmith 1929-30



by https://suburbancitizen.wordpress.com/2014/05/12/empire-builders-1750-1950-at-the-va/


by http://dome.mit.edu/handle/1721.3/55878


by http://dome.mit.edu/handle/1721.3/55879


by http://mrdingo.tumblr.com/post/98471459806/procrete-garrison-church-of-st-martin-delhi

This could be a kind of brick-brutalism. :D
 

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Castello Sforzesco (Sforza Castle)
Milan, Italy

Built in 14th-15th century, the castle has an imposing and iconographic aspect. During the Renaissance it was the residence of Milan’s Duke Ludovico Sforza. Leonardo Da Vinci worked there as a military and civil engineer and only later as an artist. He painted the frescoed ceiling of the "Sala delle Asse" (‘room of the wooden panels’), combining a naturalist depiction with a strong symbolism.

The castle hosts a series of civic museums ranging from ancient and Egyptian art to paintings, musical instruments and 21st century furniture. The art gallery displays works by some famous Italian artists such as Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini e Antonello da Messina. Among them a real masterpiece: the ‘Pietà Rondanini’, an unfinished sculpture by Michelangelo on which he worked in the last years of his life.

see more official website





















 

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Haags Gemeentemuseum

The Haags Gemeente museum (Municipal Museum of THe Hague) was buid in the 1930's and designd by the Dutch architect Hendrik Petrus Berlage. The same Berlage whom inspired Mies v.d Rohe to build modern stuff:). This building is known as his last great work and was completed by his son-in-law, after hid death in 1934.













Non of these photo's are mine
 

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Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio (Basilica of Saint Ambrose)
Milan, Italy

The Basilica of St. Ambrose was begun by Bishop Ambrose himself around 385 and consecrated in 386. The church was built on a grand scale over an existing cemetery. The basilica was rebuilt in the Romanesque style. Historical records are lacking when it comes to an exact date, but scholars believe it was probably begun around 1080.

The interior of the basilica is absolutely overflowing with medieval art, including: many Romanesque carved capitals, a 4th-century sarcophagus carved with biblical scenes, a 9th-century silver altar, and a 10th-century canopy over the altar, the 10th-century "Serpent Column".

Between the IX and the XII century, thanks to the archbishops Angilberto II and Ansperto the transformations started that shaped the Basilica, while later the pictorial decorations of the Bramante, Bergognone and Luini followed. The basilica of St.Ambrose also boasts a formidable frame of chapels where the existing styles to Milan are represented, from l the severe forms of Luigi's Gagnola neoclassicism to the Baroque dome adorned by frescos of the Luini, to a warm intersection of Bernardino's Lanino Renaissance.

One of the most interesting sights in the Basilica of St. Ambrose is St. Ambrose himself. He is on display in the crypt, accompanied by St. Gervasius and Protasius. His skeleton is glazed with a protective coating and dressed in full bishop's finery, complete with white mitre and dainty slippers.

see more official website

 

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Abbazia di Chiaravalle (Chiaravalle Abbey)
Milan, Italy

The Chiaravalle Abbey is a Cistercian monastic complex. There is also an ancient borgo that has developed round the abbey that was founded in 1135. It's one of the first examples of Gothic architecture in Italy, although maintaining some late Romanesque influences. It was consecrated on 2 May 1221.

Works continued in the 13th century with the first cloister, south of the church, and, in the 14th century, the crossing tower and the refectory. In 1412 a small chapel was built next to the southern transept. In 1490 Cardinal Ascanio Sforza (the brother of Ludovico il Moro, duke of Milan) commissioned Bramante and Giovanni Antonio Amadeo to construct the Chiostro Grande ("large cloister") and the chapterhouse.

During the Renaissance, numerous painters and artists worked in the abbey like Bernardino Luini, Giovanni Battista and Giovanni Mauro della Rovere. In 1798, the monastery was partly demolished, while in 1861 the cloister was destroyed to make way for the construction of the Milan-Pavia-Genoa railway.

see more official website





















 

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Chiesa di Santa Maria delle Grazie (Church of Holy Mary of Grace)
Milan, Italy

Santa Maria delle Grazie is a church and Dominican convent included in the UNESCO World Heritage sites list. It is one of the most striking monuments of Italian Renaissance. In the refectory of the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, ancient premises of the Court of the Inquisition, one of the absolute masterpieces of history which opened a new era for art: Leonardo da Vinci's Last Supper. The Duke of Milan Francesco I Sforza ordered the building that was completed in the 15th century.

The main architect was Guiniforte Solari, while the design of the apse of the church has been attributed to Donato Bramante. In 1543, the Holy Crown chapel on the right of the nave, received a painting by Titian, depicting the Christ receives the Crown of Thorns. This chapel is frescoed with Stories of the Passion by Gaudenzio Ferrari. In the small cloister adjacent to the tribune near the door that leads to the sacristy is a fresco by Bramantino. The church also contained frescoes depicting the Resurrection and Passion by Bernardo Zenale.

see more official website




















 

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Church of Santa Maria del Carmine
Milan, Italy

The Church of Santa Maria del Carmine is situated in Brera district. The Carmelites, starting from the 14th century, have built a convent with an annexed church. The latter was however destroyed in a fire in 1330. The rebuilt church fell also in abandon before the end of the century, after the friars moved to another convent. The new church was built from 1400, under the design of friar Bernardo da Venezia. Works were completed in 1446. In the mid-15th century, the church became a favourite destination for aristocratic burials, as testified by the numerous noble tombs in the chapels and niches.







 

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Casa Torre Rasini (Rasini House and Tower)
Milan, Italy


The complex, designed by architect Giò Ponti, was built in 1933-1934 in an area of prime real estate that was opened up for development by the demolition of the ramparts and intended for Milan’s upper middle class. It is composed of two distinct buildings, each responding to specific needs, depending on the particular condition of the urban fabric in which it was inserted. The cubic, shorter volume overlooking Corso Venezia, in fact, addresses the reality of being a townhouse, while the slender tower is articulated in an elaborate volumetric play of terraces and views onto the neighbouring city gardens, from which to seems to rise. This results in the classical and traditional spirit of the first building — completely clad in horizontal courses of precious white marble, punctuated by the dialectical relationship between solid and void (the windows) — and the almost picturesque aura of the tower, which becomes a landmark on the skyline, thanks to the choice of finely-grained masonry infill organised in horizontal bands corresponding to the height of the various floors.


The taller building also provides an opportunity to reflect on the new city, conceived as the successful integration of urban design and architectural form thanks to the terraces, which go beyond the private dimension to become elements of the urban landscape. Inspired by the idea of Le Corbusier’s Radiant City, this urban pattern is also, however, the most vivid expression of the Italian-style home, in which “there is no great distinction between indoors and outdoors [...] here, exterior architecture is brought inside [...]. From the interior, the Italian-style home leads once again to the exterior, with its porticoes and its terraces with pergolas and verandas, with loggias and balconies, roof terraces and belvederes, all inventions that are extremely comfortable and make for a serene home; they are also so thoroughly Italian that they go by their Italian names in every language around the globe” (1928). The terrace, a veritable open-air living room, becomes a point of contact between indoors and outdoors, even when circumstances forced the adoption a more traditional language. This is demonstrated by the belvedere (complete with hanging gardens, arches, pergolas, verandas and a swimming pool) that Ponti and Lancia designed for the roof of the shorter building, protected by a balustrade, which was turned into a planter.


The reinforced concrete post and beam structural system that was adopted for both buildings is evident in the corner windows and in the tower’s bow windows that project toward the Bastioni di Porta Venezia. A modern interpretation of a buttress, this semi-cylindrical element is topped by a pergola that hints at the theme of the relationship with the park and at the same time marks the entrance of the building, designed as three splayed portals. Access to the shorter building is located on Corso Venezia and was designed as a double opening, surmounted by a pattern of windows similar — although much richer — to the one already adopted in the central portion of the Domus Flavia. The complex is the last project Ponti worked on together with Emilio Lancia.



 
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