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Thanks for the update... Correct me if I am wrong but looking at the renders again, I dont see any black panels?
 

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Thanks for the update... Correct me if I am wrong but looking at the renders again, I dont see any black panels?
Curiosity got the better of me. I should never have doubted mulkanator's photo! The spandrel panels were going to be of laminated glass but the developers are contracted to meet NHBC standards to get a warranty. NHBC don't accept laminated glass for anything other than windows, so they've settled for powder coated aluminium (colour - anthracite) instead.

That doesn't explain the colour change, so now all the renders, including the one on the hoardings are inaccurate. I actually think it looks a lot better and am rather more hopeful about the finish than I had been.

IMG_4588 by geoff bradford, on Flickr

It also means that the Juliet balconies on the lower buildings that were metal railings, then were changed to laminated glass, are back to metal railings.
 

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I think those panels make it look cheap. Would look a lot better with just red brick instead. Modern architecture, eh.
 

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The colour change seems to have been decided on before the change of material. The laminated glass would have been far more reflective than the aluminium panels, but was intended to be much the same colour. I wonder what prompted the change?
 

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Looking through the recent app, the document you mentioned about the change of material also suggests that as the glazed panel was no longer used, they revised the colour and design. A light blue matte finish would have looked very cheap. Thought'd I'd copy the whole statement.

Ref: 20/00396/NMA

The elevations at Castle Park View include spandrel panels at slab edges, adjacent to windows and at the corner elements. The original intent was for these panels to be back painted (fritted) panes of glass as approved and discharged through planning condition 3. However, with the NHBCs refusal to accept laminated glass for these elements under their warranty and the subsequent impact testing failure of an alternative heat strengthened glass we have exhausted all the options to find a technically viable and safe glazed solution.

We discussed various alternative materials such as timber and render which had the potential to be incorporated into the façade system but were deemed inappropriate and would prove detrimental to the high quality design. Another material that could be accommodated into the already evolved cladding system was PPC aluminium – it was agreed this will provide the closest match to the original design intent in terms of profile and texture.

With this opportunity to revisit the elevational material treatment we explored the use of various colours and finishes of PPC aluminium ‐ from bold primary colours to multiple grey tones, solid matt finishes and reflective gloss finishes. Whilst bold colours did provide an initial positive reaction, it was agreed that such colour does not stand the test of time and can quickly date ‐ with such an iconic building for Bristol we would be unwise to move away from our original intent of a long lasting high quality design. It was concluded that an anthracite/ slate metal spandrel would provide a contrast in depth to the window frames. This tone compliments the neutral palette of other materials of stone and brick and maintains the shifting checkerboard elevation which has become a defining feature of the scheme when viewed from around the city. Something that is lost through this proposal is the reflectivity of the environment – only made possible due to the unique properties of glass. We wanted to explore the potential of recreating this effect in a metal spandrel and looked at a range of gloss finishes. Whilst a high gloss finish did reflect the light at certain angles there wasn’t a consistency, with certain angles producing a shiny glare which would not translate well onto the elevation – ultimately reducing the quality of the design. Advice from our façade consultant also suggested a high gloss finish would be much more likely to highlight any imperfections in the metal – something which quickly became apparent once samples were received. Following this and sticking with our intent of a long lasting, high quality design it was determined a matt finish would be the best treatment and provide a consistency and quality that can be maintained over time.

A matt finish anthracite metal spandrel has proven the best option to replace the fritted glass at Castle Park View. By not overpowering the other façade materials of stone and brick it maintains the expressed external frame and shifting ‘checkerboard’ effect across the elevations.
 

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Personally I don’t think the design and detailing of the elevations was ever great, and certainly not worthy of such a prominent site in the city. It was standard Chapman Taylor, and essentially a rehash of the less interesting facades of Cabot Circus. But this definitely seems a retrograde step. It’a very busy, loses all reflectivity, and as ArchWright points out those big matt grey spandrels will sit very heavy and awkwardly in the skyline. And all done through a Non Material Amendment application. I get that nobody wants to be seen to stop this halfway through but cant help feel that Chapman Taylor should have checked that the laminated glass was covered before specifying it (NHBC is very standard) and that BCC could have pushed for a higher quality alternative design solution rather than accept an inferior substitute.
 

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The developers are applying for extended working hours in a bid to catch up on some of the time lost to the virus outbreak.

From the small section visible, I quite like the cladding. However I was never convinced that this site was great for a building this high, unless it was exceptionally good. I am not a fan of randomised window positioning or cladding, and I don’t think having the vertical edges broken into different materials works.

We are way past the point of changing it now, so fingers crossed that it turns out ok when all 26 storeys are clad. It’s likely to stay that way for at least 50 years, if the Lewins Mead buildings are any guide.
 

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After a few days, looking back at the photo of the cladding, I'm really starting to worry about this scheme, though I'l try to hold judgement until a few floors of cladding are completed. But with the dark grey non reflective panels, chequerboard style cladding and expressed staggered frame this is really starting to feel like a second rate proposal in an outer London Borough. I was hugely supportive of this scheme, maybe I was fooled by the initial renderings, but going from a reflective high quality cladding to dark grey with patches of brick cladding just does not sit right, lets just hope this does not look overly oppressive from a distance while having a decent public realm. The quality of the frame cladding and how the crown is detailed will be the saving grace in my opinion.

I'm usually positive but who knows, I really hope I am wrong.
 

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That's so much worse in my opinion... The mixture of white cladding and brick made it look fairly smart, but three different types of cladding are just one too many. Either white + brick or black + brick, not both. It looks very patchy now. Really not a fan.
 

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I don't think its a disaster, i just don't think its the game changer it potentially once was, and that Bristol needs. It will probably turn out ok but not special.
 

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Strictly speaking, it still has three cladding types, aluminium, brick and stone, rather than back painted laminated glass, brick and stone. Obviously the aluminium is now going to be much more obvious than the glass would have been.

i didn’t particularly like the original cladding with its random arrangement, which is probably going to look rather dated even by the time it’s completed. The new arrangement gives a slightly more regular arrangement to the brick panels which I prefer, but then I’d rather the building’s vertical edges were all stone. But then to be honest, I wish they’d started again from scratch.
 
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