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Resident Ignoramus
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the 15th of November, Bristol will elect its first city mayor, with central government funding available to his/her office.
Campaigns will be fought on many fronts, but planning and transport will be core issues.

Candidates who have announced their running so far are:
George Ferguson (Ind)
Marvin Rees (Lab)
Simon Cook (Lib Dem)
Paulette North (Respect)
Mr Corrupt Self-serving Lying B'stard (Ind)
Tim Collins (Ind)
John Rogers (Lib Dem)
Andy Thorne (Ind)
Craig Clarke (English Democrats)
Spud Murphy (Ind)

For news and details of candidates, see:
http://www.mayor4bristol.com/
 

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Pompodian in Exile
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Awesome thanks for starting this Bertyboy. Exciting times in Bristol Politics.

Just wondering how many of these candidates are on twitter; I know Tim Collins is a regular (@TimCollins5), Marvin Rees (@MarvinRees), Mr Corrupt Self Serving Lying Thieving B'stard (@Corrupt_Bstard) & George Fergusson (@GeorgeFergusonx) also on there.

I believe (although i may be wrong and obviously its very early days) that the current bookies favorite, simply due to Bristol's voting trends and party allegiances, is Marvin Rees. George Ferguson is certainly one to watch tho. I have to say i don't know a huge amount about him but IMO architects make good mayors.

I'm also led to believe that the elections will be held under the supplementary vote system? Utterly ridiculous as that is.

I should also say I am a member of the Labour party but (mostly) maintain an open mind and wouldn't hesitate to vote for other candidates.
 

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Sexy Astronaut
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11,810 Posts
So far I'm liking:


George Ferguson
Some issues regarding Sainsbury's and Ashton gate might put some people off, however he's hardly anti-development and very pro-Bristol and keen on getting more powers for the city if voted mayor. His career as a successful architect would hardly do the city harm, so props for that. Independent status might attract those turned off by party allegiances but could make it difficult for him to get exposure as a candidate.

Marvin Rees:
Relatively inexperienced as a political candidate which might put some people off, but well educated (Yale! people! Yale!) so hardly a lightweight. Has backing from Labour so has the support network (one would assume), but this support could go either way as far as voters are concerned. Lack of exposure through a political career could offer a 'new', 'fresh' approach to the local political landscape. Saw him in town on saturday by the fountains lulz.

Tim Collins
Save Bristol Airfield. Nuff said. Like George, independent status could be both a blessing and a curse
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Oh and will, Mr Corrupt Self-serving Lying B'stard just go away and never return, please.
 

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Pompodian in Exile
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1,791 Posts
George Ferguson may be standing as an independent (and that is always creates a bit of a disadvantage IMO) but hes probably the the most high profile candidate of the lot, certainly hasn't been lacking exposure so far.

The anti party politics vote is an interesting one; Darren Lewis chair of Bristol Labour party has been trying to pin down when GF's Lib Dem membership lapsed and is trying to use it to attack his claims of independence. Silly stuff but they clearly see GF's independent status as a potential threat.
 

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Resident Ignoramus
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The BBC should be setting up an online page for this soon. Their politics journalist is just gathering manifestos as we speak.
 

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Pompodian in Exile
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I just despare, the MOD's problems stem from disastrously mishandled contracts with the private sector and the answer is more of the same? The extend of government outsourcing/privatisation is really pushing the boundaries of sanity.
 

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Pompodian in Exile
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Bristol Lib Dems are tonight selecting their candidate for mayor from the shortlisted Simon Cook and Jon Rogers. Votes currently being counted....

And they've selected Jon Rogers.
 

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Sexy Astronaut
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Bristol mayor election: Candidate profiles

Later this year voters in Bristol will choose the city's first directly elected mayor.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-19018017

The successful candidate will take over the running of the city council from the election on 15 November, until May 2016.

There will not be an official definitive list of all candidates until 23 October but 11 individuals have so far said they will stand.

Listed in alphabetical order by surname, the potential candidates, alongside their pledges for office, are:

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CRAIG CLARKE - INDEPENDENT

Craig Clarke is in the process of founding the State Educated party and has previously contested Bristol South on behalf of the English Democrats.

"I want Concorde to fly within a year," he said.

"Free council tax for A, B and C bands until a full investigation is completed into the possible overcharging of council tax bands. D, E, F, G and H bands to continue until a review of council tax is carried out.

"To reduce council officer salaries - no council employee to be paid over £50,000 a year, directors currently paid more will be asked to reduce their hours.

"I want to bring an Olympic-style stadium to Bristol and a 20,000-seater music venue which will attract bigger bands to the city."
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TIM COLLINS - INDEPENDENT


Tim Collins is a former Avon County councillor and retired planning consultant. He wants:

"To form a 'growth coalition' between public and private sectors to encourage much-needed inward investment.

"To secure the active future of Filton Airfield and the Brabazon Hangar - 'the cathedral of aviation' - as the only necessary means to safeguard aerospace development and aircraft manufacturing in Britain.

"It is imperative that we properly design and implement a truly integrated transport system and I would use my experience to ensure that transport hubs are fully linked so that we can negate Bristol's chronic traffic problems.

"Finally, I would lobby central Government for a much-needed "Greater Bristol" authority - never again can we allow our city's trade and industry interests to be put in jeopardy by tit-for-tat squabbling between neighbouring authorities."

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GEORGE FERGUSON - INDEPENDENT



George Ferguson is an architect, former Liberal councillor and owner of Bristol's Tobacco Factory.

"I shall champion Bristol at home and abroad as a city that is 'open for business' and has the education, skills, environment and attitude to enable entrepreneurship to thrive and create a healthy and robust local economy," he said.

"I shall work tirelessly to see that any improvements to our local economy benefit our poorest communities and that regeneration is about creating real jobs and an improved quality of life.

"I shall celebrate and encourage the diversity that gives this city its special character and take every opportunity to make sure that the city is more physically and socially connected and that everyone feels that they have access to good cultural and sporting facilities.

"I shall claim as much local power as possible from central government and empower local communities and neighbourhood partnerships to take more responsibility for the delivery of local services such as provision for children and care for the elderly."
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GEOFF GOLLOP - CONSERVATIVE



Councillor Geoff Gollop is a chartered accountant and a former Lord Mayor of Bristol.

He said: "I will shake up public transport to make it more affordable and accessible, introduce the Cabot Card, just like the Oyster Card, and I particularly want Boris Bikes in Bristol and to address safety for cyclists.

"I will aim to provide acceptable levels of education within each community, targeting achievement and encouraging self-belief, and plan school place allocation more than one year in advance, to end the misery of indecision for Bristol's parents.

"Reducing the rich-poor divide in Bristol is extremely important to me and I would help our deprived communities by improving transport and education in these areas and encouraging business growth so that people can access work and investors find the city attractive.

"I will simplify recycling, start putting solar panels on the roofs of council buildings immediately, improve green spaces - and as mentioned above, encourage cycling."
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NEIL MAGGS - RESPECT




Neil Maggs is a school bursar in Bristol.

"I will set a no cuts budget to bring an end to austerity in Bristol," he said.

"Bristol will be a city of full employment that will stimulate spending and so aid growth.

"Privatisation of our schools, hospitals, transport and housing systems will end and be brought back into the people's ownership run by a fully accountable council.

"I will ensure the highest priority for those services that affect the ordinary Bristolian and I will take an average working wage."
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SPUD MURPHY - INDEPENDENT

Spud Murphy is a former Conservative councillor who runs warehouses in Avonmouth.

He has said he is standing as an Independent as he believes party politics are getting in the way of the running of Bristol.

So far he has been unavailable for further comment
.
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ERIC MUTCH - INDEPENDENT



Eric Mutch is a cafe worker and intends to change his name by deed poll to Mr Corrupt Self-Serving Thieving Lying B'Stard in time for the election.

In 2010, he changed his name to Zero None Of The Above to stand in the General Election.

He said: "I will pay an annual unconditional basic income of 15,000 Bristol Pounds a year, index-linked to inflation, to all Bristol residents.

"This will give all Bristol residents the freedom to contribute to the community of Bristol 'just for the love of it'.

"I will fund this unconditional basic income guarantee with a local sales tax on all Bristol Pound transactions.

"The Bristol Pound will be exchangeable for Sterling at 'The Bank of Bristol City Council' on a £1 Bristol Pound = £1 Sterling exchange rate."
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DANIELLA RADICE - GREEN



aniella Radice is a former energy consultant who has twice run for Bristol City Council for the Green party.

She said she wants: "To challenge the austerity agenda and create jobs for those who need them by investing in local improvement projects, funded by issuing local authority bonds.

"To offer a fair chance to local businesses by reclaiming control of planning policy and tendering council contracts 'in parts' - aiming to procure at least 15% from small and medium-sized applicants in our first term in office.

"To give power back to the people, by creating democratically-elected neighbourhood councils that will force all politicians to listen to local residents, and not just at election time.

"To make it easier and safer for passengers to change between different types of transport by introducing a transport hub at Bristol Temple Meads.
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MARVIN REES - LABOUR



Marvin Rees is a former BBC radio reporter and NHS manager.

"Bristol voted for a Mayor because we wanted things to be different, to build a world class city around bigger ideas, clearer vision and a determination to get things done," he said.

"Among my priorities will be supporting the development of a strong and resilient Bristol economy, attracting business and jobs and building iconic facilities, a fairer deal for residents and commuters with integrated cheaper transport and making Bristol a Living Wage city.

"We must also be more inclusive and engage more people in Bristol's decision making, broadening and deepening the pool from which we draw those who become city leaders.

"Making Bristol work better will need the leadership of all its 430,000 residents, including you."
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JON ROGERS - LIBERAL DEMOCRAT



Councillor Jon Rogers has recently retired after 30 years as a family doctor in Bristol. He is also the deputy leader of the city council.

He said: "As Mayor, I want to address unemployment, especially among our young people, encouraging and supporting businesses to train apprentices and deliver lasting jobs.

"Just as Boris (Johnson) has 'Transport for London' I want to set up 'Transport for Bristol' to give us more control over our public transport system and ensure cheaper, more frequent and reliable buses and trains.

"I want to see safer streets and communities and will be working closely on this with former policeman Pete Levy, who I'm backing for Police and Crime Commissioner.

"Finally I want to bring the city together, reducing inequality and promoting wellbeing."
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ANDY THORNE - INDEPENDENT




Andy Thorne is the managing director of a Bristol security firm with more than 30 years of experience in business.

He said he wants: "To form council sub-committees to focus on the elderly, young people, education, local traders, sports clubs as well as hospices and charities.

"To sponsor local businesses to bring back paid apprenticeships for the young people of Bristol.

"To encourage more referenda for the people of Bristol on issues which directly affect them at a local as well as city-wide level.

"To increase commercial awareness to attract business and enterprise to Bristol instead of Cardiff, Bath and other neighbouring cities and towns, in order to create the conditions needed for growth and employment."
 

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Resident Ignoramus
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So, initial impressions......

Craig Clarke: "I want Concorde to fly within a year". Sorry, head in the clouds.

Tim Collins: Well, I know him and he reads SSC...what more can I say ;-)

George Ferguson: Probably a favourite (if everyone else has bored of big political parties). Not keen on the "any improvements to our local economy" bit. These candidates need to be saying how they will spur the local economy.

Geoff Gollop: Sounds almost socialist for a Conservative! The Oyster Card thing is good but is being rolled out nationally anyway (though it would be good to get Bristol as an ITSO card testbed early on).

Neil Maggs: Doesn't sound terribly credible what with "nationalising" everything. I don't think BCC will be getting *that* much funding!

Spud Murphy: Seems to have given up

Eric Mutch: Raving Loony Party crusty-type. Not done much yet to make the election "funny".

Daniella Radice: Some interesting ideas. Neighbourhood councils could cost money, so I'd hope they get some power, unlike Parish and Town councils.

Marvin Rees: Rather wishy-washy manifesto there. Not sure what he's actually advocating the mayor will do?

Jon Rogers: "Want to address unemployment". How? TfGB a good idea; I know Collins wants this as well.

Andy Thorne: Like the idea of sponsoring businesses to run local apprenticeships.
Also like the idea of more referenda, but maybe they can be online to keep costs down?
 

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Sexy Astronaut
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Marvin Rees: Rather wishy-washy manifesto there. Not sure what he's actually advocating the mayor will do?
In his defence, no one else is that sure either!

Just as an aside, though I'm under the impression thing'll change the closer we get to election, so far George Ferguson and Marvin Rees are the only two I've have seen out and about and actively campaigning, it'll be interesting to see if that pays off.
 

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Resident Ignoramus
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In his defence, no one else is that sure either!

Just as an aside, though I'm under the impression thing'll change the closer we get to election, so far George Ferguson and Marvin Rees are the only two I've have seen out and about and actively campaigning, it'll be interesting to see if that pays off.
I'm sure he's got a fuller manifesto somewhere. The devil is in the detail though when deciding who has the best set of ideas.
I want to see fully costed ideas, with evidence-based rationale, not political sentiment.
 

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Sexy Astronaut
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11,810 Posts
25 candidates may stand in race for Bristol mayor

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/Vide...ristol-mayor/story-16846566-detail/story.html

Voters could have as many as 25 candidates to choose between when Bristol goes to the polls to choose a mayor. The large number of candidates is one of the factors pushing the bill for the city's first ever direct mayoral election towards the £720,000 mark.

Details of the scale of the biggest single poll in Bristol's history were revealed as the front-runner for the election, Labour's Marvin Rees, launched his campaign with a pledge to build a long-awaited arena in the city centre – and help Bristol's two Football League clubs build new stadiums.

So far 12 people have publicly declared an intention to run for mayor. But a spokesman for the city council said yesterday that 13 more potential candidates had made enquiries. The final number of contenders will only be known at the close of nominations, which open on October 9, for 10 days.

Yesterday Labour's mayoral candidate Marvin Rees, who is the bookies' favourite to win the election, officially launched his campaign.

Mr Rees, 40, said he would commit himself to the building of an arena in a central city area to host cultural, musical and other large events.

He said: "For too long, Bristol has been left behind by other forward thinking cities and we have seen attempts to bring events and conferences to Bristol slip away. An iconic, accessible arena will be a boost to the Bristol economy.
We have to be aspirational to reach global markets, grow the Bristol economy and bring jobs to the city."

Speaking about new stadiums for City and Rovers, Mr Rees said: "If elected, I will use the powers of the mayor's office to push through the building of Premier League stadiums for these clubs. It is time for 'can do' thinking. Premier League football facilities are a component of a successful city."

Mr Rees said city authorities all over the world have backed iconic, viable sporting and cultural amenities.

"But here in Bristol, we seem stuck in circular arguments. Members of the Bristol public have looked on, bemused, as time after time the new facilities we need have failed to materialise.

The mayor must give a lead to make sure real change happens. All these facilities have been planned and costed and are viable – they just need leadership and political will." He said.

Bristol City's hopes of a new £92 million stadium at Ashton Vale have been dogged by a dispute and legal wrangling for several years. Bristol Rovers have won planning permission to go ahead with their new £40 million stadium on Bristol UWE land near the MoD procurement base at Abbeywood.

But construction work cannot go ahead unless permission is granted for a supermarket to be built at the club's current ground in Horfield. Councillors are expected to consider the scheme in October.

Mr Rees said: "The football stadiums have been stalled and denied unnecessarily for long enough. We just need some political will to make these stadiums happen and to ensure we get past planning delays."

Other candidates in the election have also backed the arena and new homes for Rovers and City.

Independent George Ferguson said: "I welcome Marvin's support for my initiative. I have been advocating a city-centre arena as an essential part of the Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone." He said he was "strongly in favour" of both stadium plans.

Liberal Democrat Jon Rogers said: "I want to see two world class stadiums and an arena in Bristol. They will bring investment, jobs and raise the city profile."

Independent Eric Mutch said: "Having an arena of national importance would be brilliant in Bristol. There are tricky issues to do with moving football stadiums."

Conservative Geoff Gollop said: "It's a disgrace we have not got an arena – we are one of few major UK cities which doesn't have that level of venue. Bristol needs quality sporting venues. "

Green party candidate Daniella Radice said: "I recognise that Bristol needs new football stadia but it is time for a more imaginative response to the issue. Why can't the teams pool resources and share a ground?

"I also support building a new arena." Independent Tim Collins said: "I support both clubs' applications for new stadiums. With the arena at Temple Quarter, I would like to see a new ice skating venue incorporated into the plans."

Respect candidate Neil Maggs said: "I am totally, 100 per cent in favour of an arena at the site next to Temple Meads. In terms of the football, I support Rovers' application but I would object to a City stadium in Ashton Vale, which should have protected green status."

The council expects a 40 to 60 per cent turnout for the mayoral election on November 15. More than 500 staff will be hired for the election count, which will take place on the day after voting, outside the city boundary at the vast UWE Exhibition and Conference Centre on the university's Frenchay campus. Another 500 staff will be hired to help count votes for the Avon and Somerset police commissioner election, at the same venue and time.

The council says the cost of staging the election and count will be about £600,000 – plus another £120,000 to pay for a booklet detailing the election and the candidates, which it is required to produce by law.

Stephen McNamara, the council's head of legal services who will act as returning officer, said: "The size of this election is vast."

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/Vide...ristol-mayor/story-16846566-detail/story.html

"Why can't the teams pool resources and share a ground?" Oh dear, those silly greens.
 

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Sexy Astronaut
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...

Bristol Manifesto:
http://www.bristolmanifesto.org/about-bristol-manifesto#page-title


What’s it all about?

The idea of the Bristol Manifesto began during the Mayor for Bristol campaign, when many people said they wanted to tell the new Bristol Mayor what mattered to them. The Manifesto will be made by collecting the views and wishes of the people of Bristol in an online survey. You will also be able to fill it out on paper. We are working with Community Centres and Neighbourhood Partnerships throughout the city to help everyone answer the questions on the survey, and fill in their Three Wishes for Bristol and their thoughts. We will be collecting people’s views electronically, by post, and face to face, to give to all the candidates for the Mayor of Bristol and tell them what Bristol really wants.


Why are we doing this?

Good question. The candidates are going to be asking similar questions of the people of Bristol, and on the surface it looks like it's a futile quest. But is it? Three out of four people didn't vote in the referendum. An article in the Guardian confirms our fears: British democracy is in decline. Plato once wisely said "the price to pay for apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men", and it's a vicious circle. We fought quietly for two years to get a Yes at the referendum because we believe that the way to re-engage the public is to remind them of the power they have to change things. And we truly believe that the place to start is in our own back yard: Bristol. Now more than ever we need leaders we believe in and can follow. By asking people what they want for Bristol, we're asking them to imagine better lives for themselves and their families. It's where democracy began, and it's where we need to return to.


Where did the idea come from?

The Manifesto idea has occurred to many people in many places over the years and so isn't original as such. During the Yes campaign the idea had occurred to some of us as a way of ensuring that the opportunity of a mayor was not wasted. And then, back in March 2012 there was an article in the Guardian by Dave Hill suggesting that a Manifesto should be croudsourced by Londoners for the city of London. Only four years earlier in 2008, Dave Harvey of the BBC ran a campaign asking for people to show the best and the worst of Bristol in photos to the then new CEO, Jan Ormondroyd, which was hugely successful yet incredibly simple. A member of our early days development team, Steve Virgin, was told by a friend about another simple concept of Three Wishes, which was run in Stroud back in the 80s, and in many other places since. The final piece of the puzzle was found when someone pointed Christina Zaba, our comms director, at the Bristol Accord, and this crystallised into what is now our Manifesto for Bristol Three Wishes campaign.

The London crowdsourced manifesto, based on two weeks of debate has been produced. Ours however seeks to engage Bristol on far more many levels and in this sense, it has never been done before. At the end of the day, there are lots of good ideas, but history tends to only remember the ones who were able to carry it through. No pressure then!


Will there be live events?
Yes. Bristol Manifesto will be co-ordinating hustings meetings throughout the city, for groups who want to ask questions directly to the candidates. Working alongside the Post, we will be running live events across Bristol. Please go to our Events section to see what’s coming up.


How will people find out about the Manifesto?

Our media partner is the Bristol Post, our city’s main daily newspaper. We will also be spreading the word through neighbourhood newsletters and news sheets, the online media, local broadcast media and more.

Who’s paying for it?

Bristol Manifesto is an independent, not-for-profit group in the form of a limited company, run by Bristol people for the good of the city. There is no political nor other organisation behind it, and donations of money or time are accepted from a wide range of Bristol businesses, people and groups. Most people working on it are volunteers, and all the costs are paid for from donations. There is no Council money involved and no money from any political parties.


What happens at the end?

Once the surveys have been filled in and compiled, we will give the Bristol Manifesto to the mayoral candidates and Bristol people in the run-up to the election on 15 November. It will be published online for everyone in the world to read. After the election, the Manifesto can keep developing, and it should help the new Mayor know what voters want.

I’d like to support Bristol Manifesto
Please support this historic cause, telling the world – and all of Bristol – what the people of Bristol want for our city. Use the Donate button, or contact us directly to discuss how you can support us

I’d like to help
Bristol Manifesto depends on volunteers who care about our city and its people. If you can help, please contact us and join in. We would love to see you.
 

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Resident Ignoramus
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4,080 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'd really like to see how candidates have costed out their ideas. George Ferguson is certainly doing best at getting his ideas into the press, but as you say, trams will never come cheap and it's dangerous to tout them without having the facts and business case to back them up.
 
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