SkyscraperCity banner

Please vote.

  • 10

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • 9

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • 8

    Votes: 2 15.4%
  • 7

    Votes: 3 23.1%
  • 6

    Votes: 1 7.7%
  • 5

    Votes: 1 7.7%
  • 4

    Votes: 1 7.7%
  • 3

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 2

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 1

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Brooke House, Grade II listed Building. Tower block of 14 storey flats, 1960-62, Architect Anthony B Davies, chief architect and planner to Basildon Development Corporation. Sir Basil Spence, consultant adviser on town centre; Ove Arup and Partners, structural engineers. Concrete, with dark brown handmade brick cladding and alulmnium glazed screens and windows. Rectangular plan, with 6 flats on each floor, with central access corridor and staircases at each end of building, recessed rectangular entrance on ground floor. Block raised 8m above ground on 8 'V'-shaped fairfaced reinforced concrete pilotis, supporting flat reinforced concrete floor slab at base of flats; reinforced concrete structural cores and main crosswalls, hollow tile and reinforced concrete floors and flat hollow tile and reinforced concrete roof, reinforced concrete rooftop pergola. The visually reticent entrance, a glazed box with aluminium framing is recessed beneath the north side of the building. The main block has a uniform brown brick cladding, rising sheer on the north and south ends of the building to either side of the full height recessed glazed staircases. The principal east and west facades are identically treated with flat, low brown brick spandrels, above which are set aluminium-framed windows with a shallow 'V' plan, repeated across the width of the block. Some interiors retain wood panelling to living rooms. To north, fully glazed staircase between ground and lower ground floor with separate entrance houses fire escape stair. Lower ground reached via stairs and ramps incorporated into dark red-brown brick retaining wall to north. To east, steps leading down to East Square are a part of Daviesls composition, as is a ramp enclosed by cobbled retaining walls.
Brooke House was designed to introduce high density residential accommodation into Basildon town centre, and visually to provide a dominant vertical landmark to counterbalance the predominantly horizontal emphasis of the surrounding shops: The bold and subtly profiled pilotis, together with the siting of the block forward of the adjacent building line to the west, and facing the sunken square to the east, gives a significant townscape role to the building. Brooke House was named after the then Minister of Housing and Local Government, Henry Brooke MP.
 

·
Fus-Ro-Dah!
Joined
·
12,456 Posts
How random. A mate of mine just emailed me that exact same picture and asked me if I like the building :sly:

I told him that apart from the brown pebbledash that I think its high quality.
 

·
Fus-Ro-Dah!
Joined
·
12,456 Posts
A sensitve reclad would do wonders for it. Definately worth preserving if you ask me in these days when we are only too keen to pull down buildings of its age.

My original vote has been discounted since the poll was modified, but I wouldgive it about 7.5 I think.
 

·
It's Sting. So What?
Joined
·
32,693 Posts
Them stilts are epiiiiic!
 

·
actual gherkin
Joined
·
13,931 Posts
Are the pilotiis the only things that hold it up? Wonder how well it would stand up if a car crashed into the stilts.
Concrete stilts are far stronger than a lightweight car - it'd be no problem :) I'd bet you could remove one or even two of the stilits and the thing wouldn't fall down.

I like it architecturally but I wouldn't exactly order a print of it for my bedroom wall. Kudos for such an early example of a building on stilits.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top