SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hungary is an example of a country dominated by one big urban agglomeration. Budapest, inhabited by 2 million people, concentrate the 20 per cent of the entire country population. No other town in Hungary can compete with the role of the capital. Budapest concentrates some 50-80 per cent of the national scientific and cultural potential. The hungarian capital is very likely to become the commercial and financial centre of central europe. The development of business and financial services has been especially fast in this city after 1989. Anyway, together with Prague, the city has to solve the problems with a poorly mantained housing stock in their central areas and an obsolete urban infrastructure.
The city was created in 1873 by the merger of three towns, Buda, Pest and Óbuda, situated on the two sides of the Danube. Budapest is divided into 23 municipal districts, all of them holding the status of autonomous local Councils. The whole agglomeration area comprises 2.4 million inhabitants and is set up with 104 local municipal councils with Budapest and its districts. This is the largest metropolitan region in Central and Eastern Europe, but without any administrative territorial status.
In the Hungarian economy, export plays a key role in generating economic growth. From this perspective, Budapest is in a particularly important position. The capital is strongly involved in economic exchanges, particularly with Germany, which is in first place. Eighty percent of these exchanges occur in the tertiary (service) sector (they are mainly commercial activities). The Budapest metropolitan region became a logistical centre in the Eastern and Central European region. The central economic position of Budapest in the country is unambiguous in terms of other tertiary sectors as well, e.g., 44% of the research institutes are located in Budapest. In terms of economic performance, the Hungarian capital is in an average position compared to other Eastern and Central European cities. According to its GDP, it is ranked between the leading cities (Hamburg, Warsaw and Prague) and those that lag behind (Bucharest, Riga, Cracow and Leipzig).
The structure of the city has been under permanent development in the last few years as a result of privatisation and European integration.
The majority of Budapest’s housing stock dates back to the 19th century. A belt of residential neighbourhood raised around the city centre with 3 to 5 storey buildings and inner courtyards. This belt also gave place to the construction of prestigious political buildings (Parliament) and cultural institutions (the Opera and museums). The first underground line of the European continent was established in Budapest on the occasion of the Millennium international exhibition at the end of the century. Art nouveau buildings are colourful reminders of this period in and around the city centre. Following the political transition, the housing and real estate market opened up and intensive building activity began in Budapest with strong involvement of investors from Western, Southern and Northern Europe

http://megalopolisnow.com/2012/12/20/budapest-largest-urban-area-in-central-and-eastern-europe/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,495 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I love Budapest, I'm living here now. I came from Italy and for me here there is more optimism than in Italy. Of course there are many problems, but there are a lot of possibilites here and the city is naturally perfect to develop :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,495 Posts
^^ I love Budapest too, and I know it's a great city (such as Florence that I visited 2 years ago).
But Italy must be really in trouble if there is more optimism in Bp. Hungarians are known as one of the most pessimistic people on the world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,111 Posts
I love Budapest, I'm living here now. I came from Italy and for me here there is more optimism than in Italy. Of course there are many problems, but there are a lot of possibilites here and the city is naturally perfect to develop :)
You mean the lack of optimism because in Italy they do not push developments but rather using the existing buildings? It might not be true but this is the image for me about Italy. Or they even protest against HST lines?
I think that is a good thing. Preserving architecture and not expanding built-in areas are positive things for me - perhaps not for others.
True, investors have built a lot of office buildings and shopping centres in Budapest. What for? Half of the offices are empty as well as shops along the main streets. These were entirely unnecessary investments and I would be much more happy if they had never been built.
I can still see optimism in Budapest though. Definitely not in foreign investors but in community movements. Sometimes it is visible like the farmers' market in Szimpla Kert pub and sometimes it is less visible but clearly not as physically relevant as erecting a new building. And still, they probably do much more good to the city than constructions. Sometimes we need constructions but much less than governments and investors imagine. And we need to appreciate things that involve less physical activity even if this website is not exactly about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,344 Posts
I think that is a good thing. Preserving architecture and not expanding built-in areas are positive things for me - perhaps not for others.
I agree with you. We don't need more urban sprawl area in this country. Honestly I don't understand MegalopoisNow, why think he that an area like North of Italy is a good thing?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
420 Posts
Although I love Budapest (been there a couple of times), I seriously doubt that it is the largest urban area in Central/and or Eastern Europe. Moscow and Kiev are definitely larger, but even if you only look at the European Union, I don't know if you can uphold that claim. Berlin is also definitely larger, and Germany is usually considered Central Europe, not Western Europe. But even if you exclude Germany from the definition of Central Europe, I don't know if Budapest is really larger than Warsaw and Vienna, especially if you say "largest urban area" (and not city). All of these cities are about the same size, with the size of the metropolitan area depending on different defintions.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
8,873 Posts
Hopefully you recognized, that this thread was opened by an Italian and we are just discussing here. BTW Vienna is a bit closer and it may be considered as an urban area, i guess...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Budapest is a very nice city and unique, but there is still a long way to reach the economic status of Prague and after this, its a very very long way to surpass the one of Vienna.

Economic activity in Central Europe 2010:


If the Hungarians will vote for better politicians (not for the nationalists) I'm convinced Budapest will make its way and find its role not only for Hungary but also for Central Europe.
Btw: Budapest has a large urban area, but it's not as dense as it is in other cities. So if you focus on the population in that area I also doubt that its the biggest in Central Europe...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Although I love Budapest (been there a couple of times), I seriously doubt that it is the largest urban area in Central/and or Eastern Europe. Moscow and Kiev are definitely larger, but even if you only look at the European Union, I don't know if you can uphold that claim. Berlin is also definitely larger, and Germany is usually considered Central Europe, not Western Europe. But even if you exclude Germany from the definition of Central Europe, I don't know if Budapest is really larger than Warsaw and Vienna, especially if you say "largest urban area" (and not city). All of these cities are about the same size, with the size of the metropolitan area depending on different defintions.
The definition of 'central' and/or 'eastern' Europe varies from region to region. As a matter of fact, there are not many in the new EU-countries who would not consider Germany to be a 'western european' country, per se.

'Eastern europe' is often used as some sort of collective term for all those countries having joined the EU in the 2000's, with Russia, the Ukraine, etc. forming a different entity, on which the term eastern europe does not really fit anymore (although absolutely correct, from a geographical point of view). In my experience, anything east of the easternmost EU-borders is nowadays simply coined 'the former Soviet Union'...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top