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Not sure if we have a thread on this type of subject matter.

Source: Bay News 9.

Take a drive through downtown Tampa, and you might notice a lot of "For Lease" signs.

That's a bad sign for people in the area who are trying to keep their businesses going, and now many of those business owners are saying something needs to be done.

According to our partners at the Tampa Bay Business Journal, two of downtown's skyscrapers are up for sale: Tampa City Center and Fifth-Third Center. Some experts say when - and if - they sell, it will say a lot about how the economy is looking for the city's central core.
Full Story: http://www.baynews9.com/content/new...icles/bn9/2014/7/17/businesses_concerned.html
 

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again, why are they picking on DT. It's in the burbs also

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jflb8QFHzvU
To be fair, that's Pasco (SR54, west of US41).

There are plenty of vacancies in Hillsborough, mainly from overbuilding and tons of extra supply from the economic downturn. The former mall-turned-office park locations are struggling right now: netpark is about a third empty, as is Floriland. Lots of vacancies out in Sabal Palm, plus the business park to the south on Columbus between Falkenburg and 301 never took off (though I'm sure that has more to do with a pair of jails being in the area, if anything). Lots of vacancies and empty buildings on Madison Ave between US41 and 78th St, near Pendola Point. The stuff out at Fishhawk hasn't really made any progress. University Mall still has that empty wing, several vacant outparcels and a nearby strip mall (University Collection) that is a third empty. Telecom Park and Hidden River both have quite a few empty buildings, though MetroRapid has brought about renewed interest and several dormant sites have recently been completed/occupied by medical tenants with connections to USF Health/James A Haley VA Hospital.
 

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That's true and the list goes on. I have to agree with Brian though that not every new building has to have retail in the first floor. And DT has another 10k sq. ft coming with the Straz tower (possibly the biggest yet). Just because all this space is built doesn't guarantee a business will not only move in, but be successful.
 

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^I thought this was about office space?

Retail is another issue all together.

The problem with any location in Tampa that is undergoing urban intensification (DT, Westshore, SoHo, NoHo, USF) is that there continues to be no vision for what use goes where. And even in places where there is, the elected officials of the day just waive the plan anyways. Franklin St is supposed to be the retail spine of downtown, and was supposed to develop into the pedestrian link between the convention center area and the core... And then the city approved an egregiously misplaced project like CAMLS, which puts a big dent in that vision. (and another issue is intensity of use. This goes hand in hand with the location of use. High intensity development shouldn't be going where there isn't infrastructure for it, and low intensity development shouldn't be located in places built for high intensity uses)

Over in the Channel District, retail is supposed to line Channelside Dr, Meridian and Kennedy. So that's where they spent money on wide sidewalks, lighting, etc... But then they approve projects like The Place and Skyhouse, which put retail on interior neighborhood streets, where foot traffic is not intended to go. When the Towers at Channelside was built, they let them put the retail on the inside facing 12th, and literally walled off and moated off the Meridian side, and then later the PA itself walls off the building's retail by expanding their disastrously planned parking garage. (Ironically, Kennedy is the corridor where development has best conformed to the plan, but as a truck route, it is also the least attractive corridor to encourage ped traffic along)

In urban neighborhoods, walk-up commercial (such as retail) works best when it is organized along designated corridors, which have ample amenities for peds. But around here, they're apparently not intellectually savvy enough to comprehend the difference between having retail in corridors, or just having it just develop haphazardly.


edit... And when it comes to developing mixed-use urban neighborhoods, zoning requirements for residential projects to include some portion of 'commercial' space isn't referring to 'commercial retail' specifically, it is referring to all commercial uses. Office, retail, hotel, restaurant, entertainment, etc.
 

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^^ Jason, that strategy is exactly what the city is doing for zoning in terms of corridors.

That said this lede of the story is absolutely ridiculous. All actual data shows Downtown office space is performing best in the area. It later points out:

On paper, though, downtown Tampa has seen a surge in leasing space. On average, downtown has just under 6.5 million square feet of office space. In 2010, nearly 20 percent of that space was vacant. Today, it's a little more than 13.5 percent.
 
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