SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Camden is a town in Kent County, 2 miles south of Dover near U.S. Route 13. Camden has a population of around 2,100. Camden is one of the handful of municipalities that make up Dover's urbanized area.


A house on Camden Wyoming Avenue.



An old bank building at Main Street & Camden Wyoming Avenue.



A house on Willow Avenue.



A house on Main Street.



A house on Main Street.



A house on Main Street.



A house on Camden Wyoming Avenue.



A house on Camden Wyoming Avenue.



The Camden Friends Meeting House, on Camden Wyoming Avenue. The meeting house was built in 1805, and John Hunn, the Chief Engineer of the Underground Railroad in Delaware, is buried in the meetinghouse cemetery.



The Bible Fellowship Church, on Camden Wyoming Avenue at West Street.



Buildings on Camden Wyoming Avenue. The Morningstar Institutional Church Of God In Christ, built in 1857 as the Whatcoat Methodist Episcopal Church, is on the right.



A house on Main Street.

 

·
Delaware Adoptee
Joined
·
218 Posts
Camden looks a little more solid and historically affluent than many middle and lower DE towns. Do you know anything of its history?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Camden looks a little more solid and historically affluent than many middle and lower DE towns. Do you know anything of its history?
I think it was a major stop on the Undergruond Railroad, with the large Quaker population (and I think there was a decent Free Black population in the area as well, although Delaware had a ton of Free Black communities). It must've been an agricultural town, and I know that nerighboring Wyoming was a peach-farming town, so Camden must've been as well. Other than that, I don't know much about the place.
 

·
Delaware Adoptee
Joined
·
218 Posts
Yes, I noticed the very fine Friends meeting house, which seems especially unusual for that far downstate. Quaker settlement AFAIK was concentrated in New Castle County, consistent with the Quaker settlement of nearby Pennsylvania.
 

·
Proud Wilmingtonian
Joined
·
274 Posts
I’ve passed through the area on Routes 13 and 113 plenty of times, but on one occasion I ventured down Route 10. Wyoming and Camden (seemingly one town) have a surprisingly dense center of town(s). I looped south of the area by way of Routes 15 and 30, seeing small places like Woodside, Rising Sun, and Lebanon.

Camden and Wyoming are tied close to Dover, as they are located only 3 miles from The Green. Directly across the adjacent Moores Lake are the neighborhoods of Rodney Village and Kent Acres, which can be viewed as South Dover. The entire Dover area is settled around a sort of reverse inland river delta consisting of several small lakes fed by branches of the St. Jones River. This must have been key to the area’s history in peach farming. Although, I wonder how far the saltwater travels from the Delaware Bay?

The following are dates of settlement for ten towns/villages/hamlets in southern Kent County. As xzmattzx has cataloged in his Delaware threads, many places were built along the railroad in the middle of the 19th century.

Dover – 1683
Frederica – 1770
Camden – 1783
Magnolia – 1845
Viola – 1856
Woodside – 1856
Wyoming – 1856
Felton – 1857
Lebanon – 1867
Rising Sun – 1884
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Camden & Wyoming

Camden & Wyoming are adjoining towns, much the same, but so much different, if you can imagine. The Town of Camden is largest of the two, with much more commercial development and newer subdivisions. The Town of Wyoming has more of a home town atmosphere, has Town Pride Day, the Wyoming Peach Festival, and other local events. Wyoming town council meetings consist of about 20 people, on a good night. Each town shares the same fire department and post office. But each has it's own government and police department. Wyoming is more of an old fashioned town, with home town values. New, American Flags wave from every other electric pole down Camden-Wyoming Avenue on holidays, and peach and apple orchards are walking distance from the town. Very quaint, and very refreshing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
There are a few homes in the Town of Camden having slave quarters, and accesses to the Underground Railroad. Not all are on the Historic Register, though. It's just that these homes remain appreciated and well preserved, while other aspects of the homes have been updated for, somewhat, modern day living.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are a few homes in the Town of Camden having slave quarters, and accesses to the Underground Railroad. Not all are on the Historic Register, though. It's just that these homes remain appreciated and well preserved, while other aspects of the homes have been updated for, somewhat, modern day living.
Where are these places with slave quarters? I thought that the Governor Ross Mansion in Seaford was the only place with authentic slave quarters still in existence in the state. Maybe that's the only seperate slave quarters?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Where are these places with slave quarters? I thought that the Governor Ross Mansion in Seaford was the only place with authentic slave quarters still in existence in the state. Maybe that's the only seperate slave quarters?
Here's the Town of Camden's website. I've been in these homes, many times, and viewed the slave quarters, and access to the Underground Railroad. A couple of them have little hatches accessed via hide-away stair cases. The quarters are over top some of the bedrooms, and are only about 4' tall, with just a little window to look out. One or more of these homes has the underground railroad connecting to the house next door, and so on down the street. Of course, they have been bricked and are closed.

http://www.camden.delaware.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=portfolio.sub-category&portfolioCategoryID=2
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
29,118 Posts
A lot of 19 century houses, nice.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here's the Town of Camden's website. I've been in these homes, many times, and viewed the slave quarters, and access to the Underground Railroad. A couple of them have little hatches accessed via hide-away stair cases. The quarters are over top some of the bedrooms, and are only about 4' tall, with just a little window to look out. One or more of these homes has the underground railroad connecting to the house next door, and so on down the street. Of course, they have been bricked and are closed.

http://www.camden.delaware.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=portfolio.sub-category&portfolioCategoryID=2
I don't think you can really call them slave quarters. Those are more like slave hideouts. Slave quarters are living quarters provided to slave by their owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I don't think you can really call them slave quarters. Those are more like slave hideouts. Slave quarters are living quarters provided to slave by their owners.
Thanks for the correction. Yes, those were hideouts which were located above some of the bedrooms, entered through trap doors. The slave quarters, would be a small area I saw - a sunken summer kitchen, w/fireplace and sleeping area. That was only accessed on the way down to the basement and the Underground Railroad entrance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Regarding the photo of:
"An old bank building at Main Street & Camden Wyoming Avenue"

Yes, it was a bank, originally. For many years, it has been the Town Hall, up until spring of this year, when a new Town Hall was built south of Carl King. The old bank (old town hall) is now for sale, and also the old police station across the street on the corner of Main Street and Camden-Wyoming Avenue.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top