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Before 1980, Uptown Charlotte was the shopping destination for the entire region. But by 1988, most retail was gone. and Uptown boosters have been pining for retail's return ever since.

Maybe Charlotte was just ahead of it's time.

Looks like brick and mortar shopping NYC is struggling to exist too. A NYC newspaper is reporting that a nine block area of Broadway only has one single store open.

If brick & mortar retail dies in NYC, how in the world could anyone expect it to work in Charlotte. Maybe these long dreamed Uptown Charlotte shopping venues won't ever come to fruition. (?)

https://nypost.com/2018/04/07/the-worlds-hottest-shopping-city-is-becoming-a-ghost-town/
 

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Before 1980, Uptown Charlotte was the shopping destination for the entire region. But by 1988, most retail was gone. and Uptown boosters have been pining for retail's return ever since.

Maybe Charlotte was just ahead of it's time.

Looks like brick and mortar shopping NYC is struggling to exist too. A NYC newspaper is reporting that a nine block area of Broadway only has one single store open.

If brick & mortar retail dies in NYC, how in the world could anyone expect it to work in Charlotte. Maybe these long dreamed Uptown Charlotte shopping venues won't ever come to fruition. (?)

https://nypost.com/2018/04/07/the-worlds-hottest-shopping-city-is-becoming-a-ghost-town/
I think it's a stretch to say Charlotte was "ahead of its time" in this respect. Manhattan is a major magnet for locals and tourists alike, completely unrivaled. It takes a very long time to kill off such a vibrant commercial center as that. And what is causing the loss of shoppers in NY today is completely different than what caused UT Charlotte shoppers to disappear thirty years ago. In Charlotte, the opening of a couple shopping malls in the 1970s instantly began draining away UT shoppers. Manhattan, on the other hand, was not fazed at all by the shopping mall craze. It's online retail in recent years that's having an impact on NY, just as it is everywhere. And it's not just downtown retail that's suffering because of Internet shopping, but also those suburban shopping malls that were all the rage three decades ago.
 

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I think it's a stretch to say Charlotte was "ahead of its time" in this respect. Manhattan is a major magnet for locals and tourists alike, completely unrivaled. It takes a very long time to kill off such a vibrant commercial center as that. And what is causing the loss of shoppers in NY today is completely different than what caused UT Charlotte shoppers to disappear thirty years ago. In Charlotte, the opening of a couple shopping malls in the 1970s instantly began draining away UT shoppers. Manhattan, on the other hand, was not fazed at all by the shopping mall craze. It's online retail in recent years that's having an impact on NY, just as it is everywhere. And it's not just downtown retail that's suffering because of Internet shopping, but also those suburban shopping malls that were all the rage three decades ago.
I could be wrong, but I thought I detected a ring of irony in his "Charlotte was ahead of its time."
 

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New York's retail is booming because NY is a sea of very rich people and over 60m annual tourists. Its retail prowess is underscored by the forthcoming opening of a hyper-luxury mall at Hudson Yards, which is anchored by Neiman Marcus.

That being said, there are many empty storefronts because greedy landlords want obscene prices. Everything in NY is DRAMATICALLY more expensive than in Charlotte, and the prices sought per square foot would be inconceiveable anywhere other than in London, Tokyo, or Hong Kong.

If the rent is set at a proper level, the empty storefronts will fill quickly.
 
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