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Which Canadian Region will prosper from future economic developments?

  • Alberta

    Votes: 27 34.6%
  • British Columbia

    Votes: 38 48.7%
  • Maritime Provinces

    Votes: 13 16.7%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What are the future prospects in economic development in the Maritime Provinces and the Western Provinces?

The best city in each region, in terms of development and future aspirations?

Calgary/Edmonton/Vancouver/Victoria for the West
Halifax/...? - for the East (although locational advantage to Europe)
 

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British Columbia seems to be the place to be right now, and I'm not even from Canada!
 

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Alberta have the best prospects right now, but BC will follow very quickly. The Maritime provinces are slowly but surely coming out of their decline. BTW Newfoundland and Labrador is not a Maritime province, but it is an Atlantic province.
 

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Alberta by far has the best economic prospect for all of north america in my opinion. The province is growing so fast that the large number of migration from other parts of canada and immigration can't keep up with the number of jobs being created. They have more oil than Saudi Arabia that will last for 200 more years, that alone means they will stay very well off for many years.
 

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Ralph Klein is a f---ing asshole.

The maritimes will benefit the most and prosper because of the new deal struck between them to keep profits from offshore oil reserves while at the same time still receiving Equalization payments.

And by the way, Newfoundland and Labrador is a part of Atlantic Canada, with their own time zone, so technically you could say they're not a part of the Maritimes, however it's commonly regarded that they are.
 

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Newfoundland and Labrador should never be regarded as a Maritime province. It's separated by the Gulf of St. Lawrence from NS, NB and PEI, and don't share the same history.
 

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You are to blame said:
Alberta by far has the best economic prospect for all of north america in my opinion. The province is growing so fast that the large number of migration from other parts of canada and immigration can't keep up with the number of jobs being created. They have more oil than Saudi Arabia that will last for 200 more years, that alone means they will stay very well off for many years.
lmao!
Alberta doesn't have a fraction of the oil that Saudi Arabia does. I'm not sure where you heard that but it is completely untrue.
Secondly, Alberta is fast growing and wealthy but by any measure it isn't the North American leader. Texas has more oil for instance. Nevada has a much higher growth RATE of population (as well as actual numbers) The US has the population and Mexico has the cheap labour.

Don't think for a second that I don't think that Alberta isn't worthy of praise, it's a great place and yes, it definitely has a bright future (well, the foreseeable part anyway) and I hope it continues along this path. But please, those statements in your post were purely a product of wishful thinking and not based on facts.
 

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He isn't totally off there bud, Alberta does have the second-largest oil reserves in the world after Saudi Arabia, is the #1 supplier of crude oil to the United States, and "could satisfy the world's demand for petroleum for the next century" -- alone.

Quoted from Time Magazine.

Visit: www.energy.gov.ab.ca for more info.

Deal with it and get over yourself. Ain't no wishful thinking by You Are To Blame, only jealous undertones by yourself there 'Peg'.
 

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LooselogInThePeg said:
lmao!
Alberta doesn't have a fraction of the oil that Saudi Arabia does. I'm not sure where you heard that but it is completely untrue.
Secondly, Alberta is fast growing and wealthy but by any measure it isn't the North American leader. Texas has more oil for instance. Nevada has a much higher growth RATE of population (as well as actual numbers) The US has the population and Mexico has the cheap labour.

Don't think for a second that I don't think that Alberta isn't worthy of praise, it's a great place and yes, it definitely has a bright future (well, the foreseeable part anyway) and I hope it continues along this path. But please, those statements in your post were purely a product of wishful thinking and not based on facts.
I read somewhere when you include the oil sands Alberta has more oil than Saudi Arabia
 

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The best city in each region, in terms of development and future aspirations?

Calgary/Edmonton/Vancouver/Victoria for the West
Well in the Corridor, if Calgary prospers Edmonton does too, and so on. So in terms of aspirations all cities and towns in the corridor are looking at good future development (just look at freaking Ft. McMurray!)

We'll have to see how BC does in the future, with China reaching superpower status in 5-10 years or so.

I don't see the maritimes ever catching up in terms of growth, but at least they may be able to support themselves in the future...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Anyone know the GDP as per province in Canada?

Alberta? BC? And let's put PEI/N&L/NS/NB as one?
 

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I don't know all off hand, but I do know a few. Alberta is around $42 000/capita, Ontario is around $35 000/capita, and New Brunswick is around $25 000/capita- if it's even that much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Wow^ Surprised to see Alberta that high...must be the oil!

Is Alberta then the MOST economically stable province?! > I always thought it was Ontario then BC...mmmm
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think ONtario IS wealthier than BC and Alberta...put together?...
 

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B.C.'s economy tops provinces in 2004
Booming forest sector helped fuel strong GDP

Scott Simpson
Vancouver Sun

Thursday, April 28, 2005

British Columbia had the strongest economy among Canadian provinces in 2004, led by a booming forest industry, Statistics Canada reported on Wednesday.

B.C.'s real gross domestic product rose 3.9 per cent, its best performance since 2000, and well ahead of the national average of 2.8 per cent.

StatsCan reported that resources pushed economic growth across the West, with Alberta and Saskatchewan serving as runners-up to B.C.

Alberta got a boost from heightened activity in its oil patch to log a 3.7-per-cent improvement.

In B.C., consumer spending rose 4.1 per cent, the construction industry was working flat-out, unemployment was near historic lows, and global prices for metals and minerals provided an additional boost.

None of the numbers are considered final, and revised estimates will be published in the fall.

The B.C. figures are more than a full percentage point ahead of forecasts offered a year ago, and show the impact that an unexpectedly strong United States housing market -- and a global commodity boom -- had on this province's economy.

"Forest products experienced their best performance in years," StatsCan reported. "British Columbia profited most from this growth, with improvements of more than 15 per cent for both forestry and sawmill production. Output in coal mining in British Columbia rose 15 per cent, with much of the coal destined for export."

"It was good to see B.C. leading the pack in overall output growth last year," said Jock Finlayson, executive vice president for policy with the Business Council of B.C. "We thought B.C. would be doing well in 2004, but hadn't anticipated that it was going to beat Alberta -- it's quite an accomplishment to beat Alberta on any indicator when it comes to economic performance."

Finlayson noted that B.C. also finished ahead of the Canadian average in 2003, and "virtually matched it" in 2002.

"The forecast, for what it's worth, indicates that this year we will have another year that's better than the national average as well."

Helmut Pastrick, chief economist for Credit Union Central of BC, said average GDP growth in B.C. from 1990 to 2003 was 2.5 per cent, and added that trying to calculate the 2004 number was like hitting a moving target.

"U.S. housing starts were around two million, or so, certainly more than most forecasters had expected entering 2004," Pastrick said. "There was a really big gain in wood products manufacturing, up 16 per cent -- that's primarily lumber, oriented strand board. There was more export volume in lumber, pulp. We saw metals prices higher, coal prices up.

"Housing residential construction was up about 15 per cent or so, adjusted for inflation. Business investment was up. Machinery and equipment investment was up 5.4 per cent in real, inflation-adjusted terms."

He described the strength in the housing market as "surprising -- not just in the U.S., but in B.C. as well. We are on a four-year upswing here. The numbers coming out in the last three or four months have shown amazing resilience. Of course, these low interest rates make a huge difference."

Finlayson said the U.S. softwood lumber tariff, intended by inefficient U.S. producers to drive B.C. out of the American market, has instead made it more competitive.

"It had the effect of accelerating rationalization and restructuring in the B.C. sawmill industry. The U.S. protectionists have created a bit of a monster in B.C."

Craig Campbell, a forest industry analyst with PricewaterhouseCoopers, said the B.C. Interior forest sector "got lean and mean" enough to produce record earnings despite a 20-per-cent tariff, a 20-per-cent rise in the value of the Canadian dollar that imposed a 20-per-cent penalty on earnings, railcar shortages and "a few other complications like pine beetle."

GROWTH SPURT:

B.C. led the nation in GDP growth for 2004, with booms in sectors including forestry, construction, mining and consumer spending adding to the economic groundswell.

GDP growth 2004

Nfld. & Lab. - 0.7%

N.S. 1.3%

P.E.I. 1.7%

Quebec 2.2%

Manitoba 2.3%

N.B. 2.6%

Ontario 2.6%

Canada 2.8%

Saskatchewan 3.5%

Alberta 3.7%

British Columbia 3.9%

Source: Vancouver Sun

Ran with fact box "Growth Spurt", which has been appended tothe end of the story.
 
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