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· I want to Time Travel!
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1849 Decree of Claveria

This is just an excerpt of paragraph 8:

To avoid confusion which might result to the prejudice of those who with their surnames inherited from His Majesty certain benefits, the names of Lacandola, Mojica, Tupas, and Raja Matanda shall not be adopted except by those who have a just title to possess them.
Intermarriage may have caused some of these family names to disappear.
 

· I want to Time Travel!
Joined
·
703 Posts
1849 Decree of Claveria

This is just an excerpt of paragraph 8:

To avoid confusion which might result to the prejudice of those who with their surnames inherited from His Majesty certain benefits, the names of Lacandola, Mojica, Tupas, and Raja Matanda shall not be adopted except by those who have a just title to possess them.
Intermarriage may have caused some of these family names to disappear.
 

· Cebuano By Choice
Joined
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738 Posts
Heritage Scores in Argao

Was in Argao for a Lunch serve by the Mayor for my Guest from Agusan..

When We arrived at the pueblo a big back hoe caught my attention..


It was A dream came true...


There were demolishing the Out-Patient Building of the Hospital that obstruct the Small Kapilya for more than 40 years..


It was the Handy work Of Alex Gonzales who showed Gov. Gwen Garcia the sorry state of the chapel..

Gov. Gwen upon Seeing made some phone call and order to demolished the 40 years old building to make way of the centuries old Altar De Sacripisio..



it was the altar de sacrepisio where the un baptize children where house for the wake for they can't be inside the church..

i'll post picture later..

to Alex Gonzales and Argao LGU Well done..

SALAMAT HALANGDON GOBERNADORA GWEN GARCIA
 

· Cebuano By Choice
Joined
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738 Posts
Heritage Scores in Argao

Was in Argao for a Lunch serve by the Mayor for my Guest from Agusan..

When We arrived at the pueblo a big back hoe caught my attention..


It was A dream came true...


There were demolishing the Out-Patient Building of the Hospital that obstruct the Small Kapilya for more than 40 years..


It was the Handy work Of Alex Gonzales who showed Gov. Gwen Garcia the sorry state of the chapel..

Gov. Gwen upon Seeing made some phone call and order to demolished the 40 years old building to make way of the centuries old Altar De Sacripisio..



it was the altar de sacrepisio where the un baptize children where house for the wake for they can't be inside the church..

i'll post picture later..

to Alex Gonzales and Argao LGU Well done..

SALAMAT HALANGDON GOBERNADORA GWEN GARCIA
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
^^^^

To give credit where it is due, it was Vince Escario, Ted Villarimo and I who brought the capilla to the attention of Alex and asked him to have it cleaned (kay jugaw kaau na three or fours days before the fiesta of Argao last year). Alex had invited me to look at their planned museum. I took the time out to look for unique structures in the pueblo and Vince showed the capilla to me.

I conveyed to Alex the notion that when the Governor would come in a few days for the fiesta, she should be shown the structure and would be very convinced to have the OPD demolished if all the carpenter's clothes and old medical equipment, cobwebs and run-down gurneys would be removed. Before this, Aragaoanons simply mistook this as an ordinary mortuario. In fact, according to Alex, mga taga-bukid ug far-flung barrios nga maabot og kadlawn sa pueblo would bring their dead here while waiting for the church to open for the day. Mga kriminal pod daw nga mapatay, anhi dri ihaya.

Vince and I told Alex that this was no ordinary mortuario.

I also showed Archt. Melva Rodriguez-Java the structure and wrote a column about it (sometime in September last year).

Photos of this capilla (which Vince thinks is a rare "Capilla de Sacrificios") where the Tercento (or 3 a.m. prayer) is sung for still-born children are in the pages of the Cebu Heritage Walk Thread 4.

It was this OPD that probably "saved" and "conserved" the structure albeit in a negative way, by covering it from the elements..and from a high church official there who is wont to destroy everything he sees or do something to leave his mark on the parish (!!!). Maayo na lang this capilla stands on Provincial government property (the district hospital) or it would have gone the way of the Capilla Posa (one of only two in the Philippines) which the good monsignor decided to replace with a modern one (paet!).


In the final analysis, the successful demolition of the OPD is a manifestation of the increasing heritage consciousness of the LGU of Argao (represented by the new Mayor [fuera gaba to the previous one!], Alex, Choy (the youthful councilor), and many others there and the intervention of the Provincial Committee on Sites, Relics and Structures and denominated most especially by the unique sense of heritage as a platform of governance by Gov. Gwen.

Wa jud ka mobasa sa akong column sa CDN ha...heheh
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
^^^^

To give credit where it is due, it was Vince Escario, Ted Villarimo and I who brought the capilla to the attention of Alex and asked him to have it cleaned (kay jugaw kaau na three or fours days before the fiesta of Argao last year). Alex had invited me to look at their planned museum. I took the time out to look for unique structures in the pueblo and Vince showed the capilla to me.

I conveyed to Alex the notion that when the Governor would come in a few days for the fiesta, she should be shown the structure and would be very convinced to have the OPD demolished if all the carpenter's clothes and old medical equipment, cobwebs and run-down gurneys would be removed. Before this, Aragaoanons simply mistook this as an ordinary mortuario. In fact, according to Alex, mga taga-bukid ug far-flung barrios nga maabot og kadlawn sa pueblo would bring their dead here while waiting for the church to open for the day. Mga kriminal pod daw nga mapatay, anhi dri ihaya.

Vince and I told Alex that this was no ordinary mortuario.

I also showed Archt. Melva Rodriguez-Java the structure and wrote a column about it (sometime in September last year).

Photos of this capilla (which Vince thinks is a rare "Capilla de Sacrificios") where the Tercento (or 3 a.m. prayer) is sung for still-born children are in the pages of the Cebu Heritage Walk Thread 4.

It was this OPD that probably "saved" and "conserved" the structure albeit in a negative way, by covering it from the elements..and from a high church official there who is wont to destroy everything he sees or do something to leave his mark on the parish (!!!). Maayo na lang this capilla stands on Provincial government property (the district hospital) or it would have gone the way of the Capilla Posa (one of only two in the Philippines) which the good monsignor decided to replace with a modern one (paet!).


In the final analysis, the successful demolition of the OPD is a manifestation of the increasing heritage consciousness of the LGU of Argao (represented by the new Mayor [fuera gaba to the previous one!], Alex, Choy (the youthful councilor), and many others there and the intervention of the Provincial Committee on Sites, Relics and Structures and denominated most especially by the unique sense of heritage as a platform of governance by Gov. Gwen.

Wa jud ka mobasa sa akong column sa CDN ha...heheh
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
^^^^


Here's some excerpt from the column entitled "Last Caravan in Argao" (September 27, 2007, Cebu Daily News):



...The Casa Real of Argao, threatened with destruction two years ago, still stands remarkably intact with its tejado (tiled) roof, baldoza floors and huge timber posts---a testament to timely intervention. Incidentally, this structure has now been designated by the newly elected heritage-conscious mayor Edsel Galeos as the site for its town museum. Alex Kintanar Gonzales, the town’s tourism officer, was in fact busy putting up a gallery of old and recent photos as well as a genealogy of Argao’s old families, complete with family crests. To the right of the casa real is the Casa Tribunal, home to the judiciary, which for a time remained a shell of its former Hispanic splendor until the Supreme Court provided funds for its restoration.

More pleasant surprises came when Ricky Jose, foremost church heritage expert in the country, wrote in the 1980s of the old paso of the town---fourteen panels with bas-reliefs symbolizing the Stations of the Cross that line the coral stone perimeter fence, one of only two that remain in the Philippines today. Despite calling attention to this treasure, years of ill-advised landscaping kept it hidden in shrubbery which was finally removed last year.

Equally important is the old mortuary chapel built of lime mortar and coral stone now hidden and blocked off by the incongruous outpatient department of the town’s district hospital, (yes, the hospital in within the town’s plaza complex!).

Vince Escario suspects, given the reliefs on the facade and the altar wall of the small chapel, that this is more than a mere mortuario, already rare in Cebu, but a capilla de sacrificios, rarer still and perhaps the only one in the province. Among the reliefs on the façade is San Miguel holding on his right hand a new-born baby. The relief on the altar wall is tinged with indigo blue in parts, a color symbolizing the innocence of infants. This must have been a chapel where mothers poured out all their grief at the loss of a child, or where survivors lamented in prayers the sudden demise of loved ones due to epidemics and calamities.

...
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
^^^^


Here's some excerpt from the column entitled "Last Caravan in Argao" (September 27, 2007, Cebu Daily News):



...The Casa Real of Argao, threatened with destruction two years ago, still stands remarkably intact with its tejado (tiled) roof, baldoza floors and huge timber posts---a testament to timely intervention. Incidentally, this structure has now been designated by the newly elected heritage-conscious mayor Edsel Galeos as the site for its town museum. Alex Kintanar Gonzales, the town’s tourism officer, was in fact busy putting up a gallery of old and recent photos as well as a genealogy of Argao’s old families, complete with family crests. To the right of the casa real is the Casa Tribunal, home to the judiciary, which for a time remained a shell of its former Hispanic splendor until the Supreme Court provided funds for its restoration.

More pleasant surprises came when Ricky Jose, foremost church heritage expert in the country, wrote in the 1980s of the old paso of the town---fourteen panels with bas-reliefs symbolizing the Stations of the Cross that line the coral stone perimeter fence, one of only two that remain in the Philippines today. Despite calling attention to this treasure, years of ill-advised landscaping kept it hidden in shrubbery which was finally removed last year.

Equally important is the old mortuary chapel built of lime mortar and coral stone now hidden and blocked off by the incongruous outpatient department of the town’s district hospital, (yes, the hospital in within the town’s plaza complex!).

Vince Escario suspects, given the reliefs on the facade and the altar wall of the small chapel, that this is more than a mere mortuario, already rare in Cebu, but a capilla de sacrificios, rarer still and perhaps the only one in the province. Among the reliefs on the façade is San Miguel holding on his right hand a new-born baby. The relief on the altar wall is tinged with indigo blue in parts, a color symbolizing the innocence of infants. This must have been a chapel where mothers poured out all their grief at the loss of a child, or where survivors lamented in prayers the sudden demise of loved ones due to epidemics and calamities.

...
 

· Cebuano By Choice
Joined
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738 Posts
^^ Sorry sir i miss ur column...

But i was really move, i was overwhilm to see the OPD went down and the old glory went up..

Basta nakahilak jud ko popcorn as in lipay kaayo ko. I have a taped interview of Alex ako i air ako RADIO SHOW..


VIVA ARGAO
 

· Cebuano By Choice
Joined
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738 Posts
^^ Sorry sir i miss ur column...

But i was really move, i was overwhilm to see the OPD went down and the old glory went up..

Basta nakahilak jud ko popcorn as in lipay kaayo ko. I have a taped interview of Alex ako i air ako RADIO SHOW..


VIVA ARGAO
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
@ Ka Bino:


The next and more important step is to rescue the Puerta del Marina or Puerta Marina, which abuts the Capilla de Sacrificisios, if that is what this chapel really is (I think Ang Bantayanon, by the way, has doubts about the true nature of the mortuario).

The Puerta del Marina is crumbling in certain sections, stripped of some of its tablilla, exposing the argamasa inside. I understand that there is a passageway from the capilla or mortuario to the upper part of the puerta marina.

This should be a very interesting fact to relate to tourists and those interested in Spanish colonial fortifications and walled pueblos. :banana:
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
@ Ka Bino:


The next and more important step is to rescue the Puerta del Marina or Puerta Marina, which abuts the Capilla de Sacrificisios, if that is what this chapel really is (I think Ang Bantayanon, by the way, has doubts about the true nature of the mortuario).

The Puerta del Marina is crumbling in certain sections, stripped of some of its tablilla, exposing the argamasa inside. I understand that there is a passageway from the capilla or mortuario to the upper part of the puerta marina.

This should be a very interesting fact to relate to tourists and those interested in Spanish colonial fortifications and walled pueblos. :banana:
 

· Registered
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1,241 Posts
@ Ka Bino:


The next and more important step is to rescue the Puerta del Marina or Puerta Marina, which abuts the Capilla de Sacrificisios, if that is what this chapel really is (I think Ang Bantayanon, by the way, has doubts about the true nature of the mortuario).

The Puerta del Marina is crumbling in certain sections, stripped of some of its tablilla, exposing the argamasa inside. I understand that there is a passageway from the capilla or mortuario to the upper part of the puerta marina.

This should be a very interesting fact to relate to tourists and those interested in Spanish colonial fortifications and walled pueblos. :banana:
Is the Puerta Marina part of the fortification wall or is it part of another structure? Is it not a walled cemetery, of which the mortario was the chapel?
 

· Registered
Joined
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1,241 Posts
@ Ka Bino:


The next and more important step is to rescue the Puerta del Marina or Puerta Marina, which abuts the Capilla de Sacrificisios, if that is what this chapel really is (I think Ang Bantayanon, by the way, has doubts about the true nature of the mortuario).

The Puerta del Marina is crumbling in certain sections, stripped of some of its tablilla, exposing the argamasa inside. I understand that there is a passageway from the capilla or mortuario to the upper part of the puerta marina.

This should be a very interesting fact to relate to tourists and those interested in Spanish colonial fortifications and walled pueblos. :banana:
Is the Puerta Marina part of the fortification wall or is it part of another structure? Is it not a walled cemetery, of which the mortario was the chapel?
 

· digging into the past
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2,684 Posts
^^

Hi Pinoy Ako! :wave:

The Puerta Marina does not appear to be contemporaneous with the mortuario and does not carry any reliefs indicating it to be the gate of a campo santo. Also, it is too far detached from the entire church complex (which is surrounded by a paso, a low wall composed of embellished panels, each panel carved with a relief of one of the Stations of the Cross).

I suspect that the puerta marina and the wall in which it is attached (which is quite long on the northern side) is much older than the mortuario itself since the mortuario appears out of place---it is built too close, far too close, to the left portal of the puerta marina---as if the builder ran out of space where to put it.

Indeed, the mortuario, which is parallel to that of the Casa Real, is outside of the walls of the church and inside what appears to be a fortification of the pueblo. It appears really awkward and out of place, as if it was never part of the church complex. :dunno:
 

· digging into the past
Joined
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2,684 Posts
^^

Hi Pinoy Ako! :wave:

The Puerta Marina does not appear to be contemporaneous with the mortuario and does not carry any reliefs indicating it to be the gate of a campo santo. Also, it is too far detached from the entire church complex (which is surrounded by a paso, a low wall composed of embellished panels, each panel carved with a relief of one of the Stations of the Cross).

I suspect that the puerta marina and the wall in which it is attached (which is quite long on the northern side) is much older than the mortuario itself since the mortuario appears out of place---it is built too close, far too close, to the left portal of the puerta marina---as if the builder ran out of space where to put it.

Indeed, the mortuario, which is parallel to that of the Casa Real, is outside of the walls of the church and inside what appears to be a fortification of the pueblo. It appears really awkward and out of place, as if it was never part of the church complex. :dunno:
 
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