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Either there's no development occurring in Charleston or there are no forumers here from that area. Interesting, either way.
I don't really keep up with developments in Charleston, so I am certainly not an authority, but it does not seem like much is going on. I know that the College of Charleston is constructing an academic building on Calhoun Street across from their library. There are probably a few other projects, but I just don't know about them. Definitely nothing major, though.
 

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I may be wrong, but my take on the whole Charleston development thing is that the city probably has alot of strict zoning regulations. And that probably has alot to do with why development is hardly ever seen there. Alot of historical buildings with alot of very strict height regulations. You would probably be more apt to see bigger development north of the city or over in Mt. Pleasant area than in the city it'self.
 

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there's been a lot of infill. CoC built a big new dorm complex downtown. they're tearing down the modern library from the 60s to replace it with a faux-beaux arts 80-foot high Hilton. there's always a lot of house rehabs and vacant lots being filled in. patriots point gets new condos. north charleston's supposed to be totally rebuilt...and army wives is still filmed there.

that's about it?

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I was there a couple months ago, nothing significant happening that I saw. I did notice the CoC building, but it didn't seem that interesting. One thing someone could explain to me is why the Charleston Law School is not connected to the College of Charleston? That always seemed odd to me.

Charleston, and SC generally, has always struck me with the lack of development. It is absolutely beautiful country and the beaches are great, but little development? Charleston is almost as old as Boston and a harbor with similar significance, but not even in the same time-zone development wise. Is it just S.C. conservative policies? Did the Civil War really set Charleston back that far? Anyone got ideas?
 

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perhaps if the south would have won, charleston and savannah both would have been major benefactors and would have grown up and out with people and businesses and bigger buildings and all. who knows? Boston, along with NYC, Philly, Baltimore and DC and a host of other big cities along the north corridor of the eastern USA has carried the country's bigger portion of the population, even before the civil war, so... who knows?
i believe there's a major benefit of the clustering of large cities like that, vs. the sparsely populated south. outside of florida the southeast coast has how many majorly populated cities? um,.....norfolk, va. beach, wilmington, charleston, savannah.....
and those cities minus norfolk and va. beach are quite small in comparison to the bigger cities of the north east. does someone have a chart with data from pre civil war? you know, population stats and all? :)
 

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found some info:
"When the war came, the North had a total population of twenty-two million people of which 1.3 million worked as industrial workers. The South only had nine million people with 110,000 employed as industrial workers. Moreover, as the 1860 census demonstrated, many Southern counties had a majority of non-white persons, slaves, which would not be conscripted into the war effort other than the usual tending of agricultural enterprises. In South Carolina the slave population outnumbered the white population by over 100,000.

Immigration patterns remained steady both at the start of the Civil War and during the course of the war. The Irish comprised one of the largest pre-Civil War immigrant groups, settling, for the most part, in the large urban centers of the North. Civil War statistics demonstrate the immigrant advantage in terms of population size. Over 170,000 Irish served in the Union armies, compared to 40,000 for the Confederacy. Germans, the other large pre-war immigrant group, also contributed large numbers to the Union cause.

Northern industrial production was valued at $1.5 billion compared to $155 million for the South. Additionally, the ratio of textiles was 17 to 1. Much is written about the Southern military tradition where every man had a firearm and knew how to use it. This is often cited as a Southern advantage. Yet in actual numbers, the ratio of firearms between the North and the South was a staggering 32 to 1."



Read more: http://us-civil-war.suite101.com/article.cfm/northern_advantages_in_the_civil_war#ixzz0NijQIfPk

Plus:

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The use of railroads would prove crucial to the Union’s ultimate victory. The ability to rapidly transport soldiers and supplies greatly assisted the effort to defeat the Confederacy. At the start of the war, the North boasted 22,000 miles of track compared to 9,000 in the South. Further, as the war progressed, the inability to properly maintain the Southern system hurt Southern defensive strategies.

The employment of the railroads to effectively wage war did not go unnoticed by Prussian observers. Prussian victory in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War was due in large part to the German rail system which had more than twice the track of the French. The military use of an extensive rail system was only one war innovation learned by the Europeans avidly watching the course of the war.

The North possessed a fleet of warships that effectively blockaded Southern ports from the first weeks of the war. Although the South utilized “blockade runners” like the CSS Alabama, the Union blockade, part of General Scott’s initial “anaconda plan,” kept the South from receiving desperately needed supplies and munitions from Europe.

Leadership also played a major role in the Northern advantage. Although the South had better military leadership as the war began, with most field grade officers coming out of West Point, most historians agree that Abraham Lincoln was a better leader than Jefferson Davis. Davis’ personality was cold and abrasive. Lincoln was sincerely humble but a fast learner, spending hours in the Library of Congress reading and seldom intervening directly in field operations.

In 1861, the South fervently hoped that the North would allow it to leave the Union peacefully. Yet even Jefferson Davis questioned this seemingly naïve notion when he arrived home at his Mississippi plantation, telling his wife that everything would be lost. The industrial and military might of the North ultimately overwhelmed the South, demonstrating the Northern advantages.

Sources:
Statistics taken from the 1860 census; Robert Divine, T. H. Breen, and others, America Past and Present 8th Ed.(Pearson-Longman, 2007) chart on page 427.

Gabor S. Boritt, Why the Confederacy Lost (Oxford University Press, 1992).

Stephen B. Oates, The Approaching Fury: Voices of the Storm, 1820-1861 (Harper/Collins, 1997)."



Read more: http://us-civil-war.suite101.com/article.cfm/northern_advantages_in_the_civil_war#ixzz0NijnhTe0


http://us-civil-war.suite101.com/article.cfm/northern_advantages_in_the_civil_war

So, perhaps it's because of the above facts that charleston never became what boston is today?
 

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Well i know there's not that much activity in the Houston updates or development section.
Lately, I've has to revive some of the U/C projects....
Now we do have plenty of construction going around, but Houston has its own forum, so they tend to stick there. There's only a handful from the area on these larger forums.

If all the members from HAIF would contribute to SkyscraperCity, it would be enough to represent a nationality here.
 

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Charleston does have strict zoning ordinances along w/ a fierce preservationist attitude...but, there are many projects ongoing and planned for downtown...of course, many will either renovate, or incorporate old buildings into new ones...the area would get a huge bump though if the Magnolia Project in the neck would ever get underway...Noisette unfortunately is dead unless another company can take over...Promenade is another one that is unfortunately dead...MUSC is still continueing to build and has built some nice towers in their medical complex...there are new condos that have been built along Concord Street across from the port offices and passenger terminal...as mentioned, C of C has been building some new stuff...the city is trying to come up w/ plans to redo parts of Calhoun Street over by Fountain Walk and the Aquarium...

One thing you will never see though is actual highrises anywhere near Charleston...even on the beaches, which I actually like.
 

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On my last visit to Charleston I wandered over to the Charleston Waterfront Park (Pineapple Park) -- it is an entirely reclaimed brown field that was incorporated into the existing fabric of Charleston's French Quarter. This was quite a significant undertaking, and a modern development within the historic district of the city. I was particularly interested in this area from an urban design standpoint, it has won several high profile landscape architecture awards as a successful redevelopment.

I also noticed several projects under development North of the Battery and historic districts on King Street.

The thing to remember about a city like Charleston, or Savannah, is that a pre-existing city that is largely intact really has no reason to build big and bold. Instead, infill projects that compliment what is already there and build upon it actually do a better job of expanding the urban footprint than most large scale development in a lot of the newer cities out there.
 
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