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Charlotte Coliseum, 1988-2007...
Probably not the place to discuss it, but this building was more than usable when it was destroyed. It sat 24,500 and actually made a profit (not many publicly held venues can say that).

It's demise came as a result of greed. An NBA team (the Hornets) left town when the public voted down a new arena, as to us, we'd just constructed one for this same man in 1986, while in 1996 NFL Panthers owner Jerry Richardson privately financed his own 73,000 seat STADIUM. This lead us to ask, if Richardson can build a stadium, why can't Shinn and Woolridge pool their money and build an arena?

To add insult to public injury, the city council pushed through a new publicly funded arena to house a team that's chicken-fried sh*t against the will of the public. It seats 5,000 less for NBA events (yes, less) but it has skyboxes! (Which most people in Charlotte can't dream of affording.)

Kind of makes me feel ill.
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The Charlotte Coliseum was larger than most indoor arenas, even the United Center in Chicago, and its capacity was on par with the Rupp Arena and the Greensboro Coliseum. What really hurt the Coliseum was its lack of luxury boxes and premium seating, and that was pretty much a reason why they ended up demolishing the Coliseum. The Palace of Auburn Hills, which opened in the same year as the Coliseum, has 180 luxury boxes, and the Coliseum may have had only eight such boxes.
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Back in the days when the NBA was a joy to watch.

I remember every kid in school had a starter Hornets jacket. :)
Only Final Four I ever attended was held at Charolotte Coliseum in 1994.

Duke and Arkansas beat Florida and Arizona, with Arkansas prevailing in the finals.

Duke was led by Grant Hill & Cherokee Parks while Arkansas had Scotty Thurman & Corliss Williamson.

President Clinton (an Arkansas fan) was in attendance. I sat in one of the lower level end zones. Back then, coaches got seats and usually sold them. I believe I sat in Bob Bender's seats.

It was the last Final Four ever played in an arena as opposed to a football stadium.

Highlights
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Only Final Four I ever attended was held at Charolotte Coliseum in 1994.

Duke and Arkansas beat Florida and Arizona, with Arkansas prevailing in the finals.

Duke was led by Grant Hill & Cherokee Parks while Arkansas had Scotty Thurman & Corliss Williamson.

President Clinton (an Arkansas fan) was in attendance. I sat in one of the lower level end zones. Back then, coaches got seats and usually sold them. I believe I sat in Bob Bender's seats.

It was the last Final Four ever played in an arena as opposed to a football stadium.

Highlights
Not quite. Close. The 1996 Final Four was played in the Meadowlands Arena.
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So this was just a case of bad location right?
So this was just a case of bad location right?
It was fine building, it just lacked luxury suites, club seats and other points of sale that unfortunately is necessary for today's sports stadiums.
This was one of four NBA venues built in 1988. Ironically, all but one are gone or in the process of being replaced (Coliseum, Miami Arena, ARCO/Sleep Train & The Palace). Much like Camden Yards did for baseball, The Palace was a pioneer for future NBA venues. Arenas like the Coliseum went with a less spectacular design and were replaced within 2 decades.
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I always feel bad for arenas and stadiums built at the wrong time. So many times its just a matter of 5-15 years and it goes from a great state of the art stadium to not even fit for a college team to use for an exhibition.

My favorite example are the spring training parks built in Florida during the 1980s since I live in Tampa and watched it first hand as the park in Kissimmee changed the game forever.
1991 NBA All-Star Game at the Charlotte Coliseum.

This was one of four NBA venues built in 1988. Ironically, all but one are gone or in the process of being replaced (Coliseum, Miami Arena, ARCO/Sleep Train & The Palace). Much like Camden Yards did for baseball, The Palace was a pioneer for future NBA venues. Arenas like the Coliseum went with a less spectacular design and were replaced within 2 decades.
Ironically, the Palace has hosted its last Pistons game.
This was one of four NBA venues built in 1988. Ironically, all but one are gone or in the process of being replaced (Coliseum, Miami Arena, ARCO/Sleep Train & The Palace). Much like Camden Yards did for baseball, The Palace was a pioneer for future NBA venues. Arenas like the Coliseum went with a less spectacular design and were replaced within 2 decades.
The Bradley Center (which is also in the process of being replaced) also opened in 1988.
Ironically, the Palace has hosted its last Pistons game.
The Pistons leaving The Palace is much different and unique. The Pistons were basically given a brand new arena to play in. They were not actively trying to replace The Palace. Had LCA not been built for the Red Wings, the Pistons would still be at The Palace for many years to come.
What will eventually be built on the site of the Coliseum?

The Cav's old arena in Richfield, OH has long since been converted into a meadow.
Theres a Farmers Market on the Yorkmont side of the car park, and housing on the Tyvola side... Still a lot of weedy concrete last time I looked
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