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Dilly ding! Dilly dong!
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There goes the skyscraper then. Not that it would have been built anyway, what with the council seemingly hell-bent on not having anything tall in Nottingham.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just another in the long line of highly-leveraged chancers that emerge every time there is a property boom and (inevitable) bust. :eek:hno:

He owns Ilkeston Town FC (he's a Cotmanhay boy) so their future is probably under threat.
 

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Mr Whyte, a former bankrupt, developed his businesses as a sole trader through a series of unincorporated businesses. This means he cannot seek the protection afforded to a limited company by administration, receivership or liquidation.
i shouldn't laugh really but... hahahahahahahahaha
 

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ummm no, generally they have already lost their jobs. this is about the chickens coming home to roost and poor chek whyte having to sell his enormous mansion. people i know who are owed money by him are thrilled he is getting his just deserts and has no protection so his personal assets will be broken up. i find this delicious and wish it happened to more people like him who usually leave a string of failed businesses and walk away just fine because they aren't liable and that's what i am laughing about which is why i quoted that paragraph.

so once again... hahahahahahahahahaha.
 

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did you hear the one about the bank that was unaware he had gone bankrupt and was banned from being a director but gave him money anyway and then said to a creditor they wouldn't have had they known when they found out only when the creditor told them years later?
 

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In hindsight this article from Insider magazine seems rather absurd, especially considering it was only published in April this year.


The Marmite man

You either love him or you hate him, he says. But this particular working class hero seems to be doing nicely out of the recession, thank you very much. Sam Metcalf meets Chek Whyte, the not-so-secret millionaire.

Remember that television programme The Prisoner? Well, you would be forgiven for thinking you had walked on to the set if you didn’t really know who Chek Whyte was. Chek Whyte Industries (CWI) is based at the huge Stanford Hall estate, on the border of Leicester and Nottinghamshire. A walk from the car park takes you past an empty pool that apparently used to be full of sea lions, a theatre, a wishing well and a miniature crazy golf course. Boring, it’s not.

Once in the reception, you’re sat on sofas that resemble huge red lips. There’s a television in there, but it’s not showing CNN, Bloomberg, or BBC News; it’s showing the Jeremy Kyle Show.

Stanford Hall was built between 1771 and 1774 for Charles Vere Dashwood. In 1928 it was bought by furniture company millionaire Sir Julien Cahn, who presided over its 1930s heyday. He added the grade II-listed Art Deco theatre where he staged magic shows, also building an Art Deco swimming pool and a trout lake, employing 60 staff to manage his estate.

The sea lion pool, by the way, is said to be the result of his wife struggling to find him an original birthday present.

In many ways Chek Whyte seems the perfect heir to this legacy. He bought Stanford Hall in 2007 and made it CWI’s home. It is a far cry from his often impoverished upbringing in Ilkeston when he was in and out of care homes, and the victim of uninterested parents.

The mean streets of Ilkeston were where Whyte learned to fight back, but he desperately wanted to escape them. And although he’s a multi-millionaire, that has not stopped many in the commercial property game almost dismissing him as a little bit dodgy or circumspect.

Whyte readily admits he has been through bankruptcy – he has an engaging, open character, something sadly lacking in people these days, but he does care what people think about him. “Obviously I’m bothered about what they say about me,” he says, “but I always say I’m like Marmite: you either love me or hate me.

“Image is important to me. I look up to Urban Splash – they’ve managed to market themselves in a unique way. They also work to high specs, and that’s what I want my buildings to be like.”

Whyte may be rough and ready, but he is not daft. Quick of mind, he is a blur of ideas in the hour or so I spend with him, and while he often plays on the working-class-lad-made-good schtick, he presents a pretty convincing case that his style of getting things done might be the best one.

“I always talk plain English,” he says. “I like people like John Prescott. He’ll say what’s what to people who aren’t used to having it said to them. I have belief in myself and the ideas to back it up.”

Whyte’s latest idea is a £60m countryside retirement village that will return Stanford Hall Estate to its former glory. Planning permission has been granted, subject to a section 106 agreement on the site, requiring the public to use some of the facilities. Listed building consent is also being sought, and will be issued if the government office for the East Midlands does not call in the application.

CWI partnered The Theatres Trust and English Heritage to secure full planning for the countryside retreat, which will feature a 120-dwelling retirement village with shops, a luxury spa and a leisure centre that will be open to the public. There will also be a 70-bed care home.

The work will preserve the character of the listed buildings and parkland to restore the estate as a whole. The sea lion and penguin pool will be revived and a cricket pitch included. A 1930s lido will be replaced with a modernist block of spa apartments, still housing the historically important lido boards.
The first phase is expected to be complete by February 2010 with the release of 40 retirement apartments ranging from 800 sq ft to 1,000 sq ft. The new-build care home will support the retirement village, which will be available to people over 55. Whyte will call the development Whytehall Retirement Village, just in case anyone forgets whose land they are on.
“It’s a unique setting,” says Whyte, gazing out of his office window at the rolling grounds. “Just imagine what it’s like in the summer. It’s a beautiful setting for a scheme like this. Everything will be available on site for people to enjoy – a spa, organic shop, delicatessen and bakery, and medical support nearby.”

Not that Whyte is entrenched in the middle of nowhere. He has his fingers in more pies than Mr Kipling. He owns residential and commercial schemes in the East Midlands and has done work in Yorkshire and the North West. You may remember him from Channel 4’s Secret Millionaire, when he saved Salford Lads Club, whose image was made famous for gracing the cover of an album by 1980s beat combo The Smiths, as well as levelling a row of clapped out back-to-backs and building new homes for residents.

A quick mover. And none more so than in 2008 when he fought off Rok and Sol Construction and bought Thomas Fish, one of Nottingham’s oldest building companies. The company was one of the first victims of the downturn and went under with debts of £5m. It was also starting the South Reef development in the city, so Whyte took Thomas Fish over.

“I felt sorry for Charles Fish and his family,” he says. “It wasn’t his fault the company went under; it had one big bad debt. And with me being a Christian, the name Fish was ideal. I’ve got ten more companies that I want to buy and we’ll be looking at floating them on AIM.”

Whyte also announced in 2008 that he wanted to do build a skyscraper in Nottingham. When it was announced, Chek Whyte Tower – again no false modesty – was 50 storeys. But after wrangling with planners it’s now 32 floors. “I want it to be iconic,” he says. “That’s why I’ve got Ian Simpson in from Manchester to design it. We had to drop the height as planning said it would block the view of Sneinton Windmill from the Castle.”

He is not that enamoured with those in City Hall. Nor does he think Westfield will do anything with the Broadmarsh shopping centre any time soon. Whyte says: “I can’t see Westfield announcing anything for a while. It had been going on for so long – we need a planning committee that has more proactive leaders.”

He’s on a roll now. “Nottingham needs an ambassador, someone like Mich Stephenson (the chairman of Nottingham Regeneration Limited). I always got on well with him. I want someone to be excited about the schemes I’m bringing to the city, but Nottingham is 50 years away from being the city it wants to be.”

He lays into the city council’s offices: “I don’t think I’m telling them anything new when I say they need a makeover. Look at my offices; I’ve got Paul Smith carpets, bars and amazing scenery around me. Nottingham City Council’s offices are crap. If they want inward investment from the best people, they’ve got to show that Nottingham is the best place.”

Handbags put safely away, talk turns to Christianity. Yes, that’s right. Whyte is of the born-again variety. He talks openly of God walking into his office one day and telling him what to do, which can be a bit unnerving for the committed atheist.

Whyte’s faith has led to him to build churches all over the place. He is also involved in community schemes that go on to estates to bring what he calls ‘The Message’. It is hard to counterbalance Chek Whyte, the hard-nosed Marmite man, with some kind of latter-day property missionary. But it seems to keep him grounded – even about the downturn.

“What a time to be buying property,” he says. “We’re in a perfect storm; you can pick up stuff for 70 or even 50 per cent of its market price a year ago. That’s not to say I’m doing things on the cheap. Look at South Reef – it’s so well built it’ll still be standing in 100 years.”

Whyte will no doubt be looking down on his work and seeing that it is good.
 

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Handbags put safely away, talk turns to Christianity. Yes, that’s right. Whyte is of the born-again variety. He talks openly of God walking into his office one day and telling him what to do, which can be a bit unnerving for the committed atheist.
i suppose god told him to hide those cars from the administrators! doesn't the bible say "it's harder for a rich man to get into heaven than a camel through the eye of a needle?"

i can't believe they'd publish that shit when it was already well known he was having trouble. that's the worst piece of puff PR i've seen since bashir issa who i was screaming about for ages was getting all sorts of shit about how wonderful he was in the newspapers in manc.
 
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