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One of those pics is of Japan, not China.

Does anyone know where the first two pics are?

I'm thinking a temple on Taishan maybe. It could even be in Taiwan.
 

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Saigonese said:
Anyway I find Japanese architecture to be more serene, tranquil, majestic and gives you a sense of calm and inner peace.
it depends, chinese architecture varies from place to place. the buildings in northern china (ie bj and xi'an) look more majestic and superficial, while building in southern china can give you a sense of serenity and inner peace.

in northern china the colours are red and gold (imperial colours)..in southtern china you see a lot of black and white.




 

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well, the Grand Hotel is not ancient but its based on ancient style
 

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Saigonese said:
Anyway I find Japanese architecture to be more serene, tranquil, majestic and gives you a sense of calm and inner peace.
What does Japan have to do with this?


Vietnam does quite poorly in the historical architecture department. If only the US didn't bomb Hue and the other cities like crazy.
 

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loureed said:
What does Japan have to do with this?


Vietnam does quite poorly in the historical architecture department. If only the US didn't bomb Hue and the other cities like crazy.
Do you have a problem with my opinion? Can't stand people giving honest thoughts and comparisons. Geez typical Chinese arrogance.
 

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Why did you get offended too?


because I mentioned Vietnam which has little to do with this thread, just like how you mentioned Japan.
 

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Saigonese said:
Do you have a problem with my opinion? Can't stand people giving honest thoughts and comparisons. Geez typical Chinese arrogance.
Your manner is okay but I suppose you're in some ways anti-China...I saw a thread you posted previously bashing the Chinese for the anti-Japan thing...
I don't mean you are wrong, but it really seems to me that you're kind of anti- China and kind of "pro-Japan"(I can't think of a proper word due to my poor English...)
And...please don't stereotype the Chinese as "typical arrogance". There are some arrogant Chinese in SSC, but please be fair to other Chinese forumers.
 

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in my eyes all the buildings in pics are "new", because i am in Xi'an now. some great buildings here even over 1000 years. building on my icon called bell tower over 600 years old located at the center of Xi'an city and this on Dayan tower in Xi'an city over 1000 years.
 

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loureed said:
One of those pics is of Japan, not China.
I'm thinking a temple on Taishan maybe. It could even be in Taiwan.
i can't sure about this. people in other countries say Chinese style architecture just means Ming or Qing dynasty(about last 600 years) but China also have Tang style abot 1000 year ago and Han style about 2000 years ago and so on. Japan or Corea also have many Chinese style buildings. In Tang dynasty Japanese came to China to learn something. Buddhism came into Japan from a Chinese temple called Qingliang in Tang dynasty, so Japanese temples usually are Tang style buidlings.
 

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metallinestorm said:
... Japan or Corea also have many Chinese style buildings. In Tang dynasty Japanese came to China to learn something. Buddhism came into Japan from a Chinese temple called Qingliang in Tang dynasty, so Japanese temples usually are Tang style buidlings...
I guess some Japanese formers would get upset about how you define their traditional architecture style...
I agree that most J/K traditional buildings are similar to the Tang style, but they are different. The Japanese and Koreans did absorb lots of Tang elements into their own architecture styles, but that doesn't mean they are the same. Basically they just look similar and can be grouped as the "East Asian Style", trust me.
I'm sure one of the pictures is Japanese(I can't think of the building's name...).
 

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Alex Pox said:
I guess some Japanese formers would get upset about how you define their traditional architecture style...
I agree that most J/K traditional buildings are similar to the Tang style, but they are different. The Japanese and Koreans did absorb lots of Tang elements into their own architecture styles, but that doesn't mean they are the same. Basically they just look similar and can be grouped as the "East Asian Style", trust me.
I'm sure one of the pictures is Japanese(I can't think of the building's name...).
i also think your words are right.
i just remind people in Europe, American or African know Chinese style buiding not just appear in China or just Ming or Qing style old buidings. it isn't a easy thing to distinguish which building in China or Japan or korea even in US China town according to a pic which just show part of them. and i think that is unnecessary. Great building must be as people's fortune first then as one national pride.
 

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metallinestorm said:
i can't sure about this. people in other countries say Chinese style architecture just means Ming or Qing dynasty(about last 600 years) but China also have Tang style abot 1000 year ago and Han style about 2000 years ago and so on. Japan or Corea also have many Chinese style buildings. In Tang dynasty Japanese came to China to learn something. Buddhism came into Japan from a Chinese temple called Qingliang in Tang dynasty, so Japanese temples usually are Tang style buidlings.
It is.

You know how I know?

because it says horyuji temple in the picture's address. :)
 

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I took a course last year on Japanese architecture and I've been to China. There are many different architectural styles in both countries, so it's hard to generalize. Japan does have a "native" style that can be seen in the oldest Shinto shrines. Buddhist temples generally show the strong Buddhist influence, but this influence comes from Korea, and not directly from China. It wasn't until much later that Japan became familar with China, and essentially looked up to China as it's cultural ancestor.

The oldest Buddhist temples in Japan show a strong Tang influence by way of Korea. An example of this is Todaiji in Nara.

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Notice the huge brackets, which are relatively simple compared to the ones in later Chinese and Japanese architecture. There aren't any Tang wooden structures remaining in China, but there are reconstructions outside of Xian that are believed to be accurate, and they are relatively simple compared to the Forbidden City or later temples. During the Tang, the pagoda was a stone structure, such as the Dayan Ta in Xian posted above, and was heavily influenced by Indian architecture. Later advances in carpentry made the famous wood pagodas possible.

The Japanese came up with more complex styles from there, such as the Zen style which actually had some Indian influences in addition to up-to-date Chinese advances. The Chinese and Japanese continued to work within the Chinese tradition of wooden buildings with complex bracketing, curved roofs, multi-story pagodas, etc... but they each developed the style in their own ways, and thus the style can be compared to pan-European styles such as Gothic, which had a definite origin in France, but was expanded and innovated in other countries such as England, where perpendicular Gothic and the fan-vault were invented.

To be more specific, the height of Chinese architecture is most certainly the Forbidden City, which has a complex bracketing system, not to mention a complex layout. The Temple of Heaven is also an advanced piece of Chinese architecture, as the interior shows. This is where the Chinese took their architecture. I recommend this picture to show how advanced Chinese architecture had become (it takes a long time to load it seems) : http://photoimg5.qq.com/cgi-bin/load_pic?verify=y49S30IV%2BpwAja4U3mxHxw%3D%3D

The Japanese advanced early with pagoda architecture and new styles:





The Japanese also later invented the Shoin style of domestic architecture (what we think of as a Japanese house, with tatami, sliding doors, etc...), which is best exemplified by Katsura. Also the Japanese castle is of course native to Japan, but has influences from Chinese tradition. They also developed a "Japanese Baroque" which is highly ornate, guilded, and arguably a a step-backwards from the simple purity of earlier forms. Toshogu:



In conclusion, Japanese architecture is heavily influenced by Chinese architecture, but is not simply a copy of Chinese forms. And although famous architectural critics such as Pepsicola/Gunei have stated that "China is sucks" and "Japan number one," Chinese architecture is different, but not inferior to Japanese architecture. As far as Korea architecture goes, I think it's probably a similar story to Japan, although the links between Korea and China were always stronger than Japan to China. If anyone knows more about traditional Korean architecture, please post some info!
 
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