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Chinese ambassador rejects espionage claims
CTV.ca News Staff

China's ambassador to Canada is rejecting claims by the new Conservative government that Chinese spies are stealing Canada's industrial and high-tech secrets.

In an exclusive interview with CTV News on Thursday, Ambassador Lu Shumin declared: "There is no Chinese espionage in Canada."

"We express our grave concerns about this and, as Chinese ambassador, I can see the so-called Chinese espionage against Canada does not hold water."

The ambassador echoed a statement made earlier in the day by the Chinese Foreign Ministry, which said the spy claims were baseless and irresponsible.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said China has not been engaging "in any so-called economic espionage activities in Canada."

"China expresses great concern over this. We hope the Canadian government can make a clear distinction between what's true and false and do more to help the healthy development of the China-Canada strategic partnership," Qin said at a regular briefing.

The accusation of espionage was first raised in an interview last week on CTV's Question Period, in which Foreign Affairs Minister Peter MacKay said his government was "very concerned about economic espionage."

While in opposition, the Conservatives challenged the Liberal-led government to act on reports of Chinese espionage.

"It is something we want to signal that we want to address, and to continue to raise with the Chinese at the appropriate time," MacKay said.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper backed MacKay, saying the minister's comments were well-founded, adding that he did not believe trade between the two countries has been threatened.

"We have some concerns with certain activities of the Chinese government in this country and we do intend to raise them at the appropriate time," Harper told reporters in Montreal.

In response, the Chinese envoy issued a veiled warning to the prime minister, hinting that a recent deal signed by the former Liberal government to improve economic trade could be in jeopardy.

"These kinds of accusations do not help the relationship and are not conducive to the development of this strategic partnership between the two countries," Lu told CTV's Ottawa bureau chief Robert Fife.

CSIS intelligence

Intelligence files reportedly suggest that an estimated 1,000 Chinese agents and informants operate in Canada. Many of them are visiting students, scientists and business people, told to steal cutting-edge technology.

One example MacKay pointed out was China's Redberry -- an imitation of the BlackBerry portable e-mail device -- created by Waterloo, Ont.-based Research in Motion Ltd.

According to a 2003-2004 CSIS report to Parliament, foreign spies are trying to uncover "Canada's scientific and technological developments, critical economic and information infrastructure, military and other classified information, putting at risk Canada's national security."

However, CSIS does not specifically mention China in the report.

Former Canadian Security Intelligence Service agent Michel Juneau-Katsuya has said the former Liberal government knew of the espionage, but were too afraid to act and anger Canada's second-largest trading partner.

"We didn't want to piss off or annoy the Chinese," said Juneau-Katsuya, who headed the agency's Asian desk. "(They're) too much of an important market."

However, he argued that industrial espionage affects Canada's employment levels.

"For every $100 million that we lose in intellectual property or business, we lose about 1,000 jobs in Canada," he said.
 

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The Tropics of Canada
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wow , They should really have evidence before doing a story like this , but I suppose it is possible .
 

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Lets not piss off the all mighty people’s republic of china. They will kill their own children to stay in power.

Why are all the jobs going to china?
Because the “people’s currency” the yuan is tightly pegged to a few other currencies and not traded openly.

Need a new organ? Just pick the “donor” you wish and a guard will shot him for you.
 

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The Redberry? That's hilarious, but outrageous too. Ontario's Research in Motion (RIM) stole that technology fair and square! How dare china re-steal it.

Until you jerks break your addictions to cheap made-in-china wal-mart crap, I don't see anything being done. Maybe when the U.S. is done with Iran, they'll go liberate china?

If we hanged them, we'd be almost as bad as china.
 

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MisterPing said:
Why are all the jobs going to china?
Because the “people’s currency” the yuan is tightly pegged to a few other currencies and not traded openly.
Keep in mind though that the income gap between China and North America is so wide that the Yuan would have to at least increase its valuation by at least 10-20x against the CDN/USD to be able to close the competitive gap.

I wonder what other country is involved in this kind of espionage. Clearly, the CSIS report did not single out China, so there must be other nations partaking in this kind of illegal activity.
 

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What'u smokin' Willis?
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You must protect your secret recipe for maple syrup Canadians! :poke:

Seriously, China spies on everyone.
 

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Wonderwall said:
Until you jerks break your addictions to cheap made-in-china wal-mart crap, I don't see anything being done. Maybe when the U.S. is done with Iran, they'll go liberate china?
Nah. I am tire of my tax dollars going to fund wild acts of "liberation". I think we will leave this one to the Canadians. ;) Good luck!
 

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really? are there anything in Canada worth stealing? ;) I had thought Canada is a lazy country without any creativities.
 

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^The creative people all moved away.
 

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The Tropics of Canada
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Check this out, yes its old , but it answers if we have SPYS.
I didnt even know we had these things. Pretty kick ass. :eek2:



Canadian spy probe crashes in Afghanistan
Last Updated Fri, 21 Nov 2003 13:28:26 EST
CBC News
KABUL - Canada temporarily halted its new air surveillance program in Afghanistan Friday after one of the army's robotic aircraft slammed into the ground.

The parachute designed to help soften the landing failed to open on the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), defence officials said.



Canadian UAV test (CP photo)
Investigators were trying to figure out what happened. In the meantime, the spy plane's testing program was halted.

Canada has two other UAVs in Afghanistan, mounted with video cameras. The drones are each about 3.5 metres long and run on gas-powered Bombardier snowmobile engines.

They can stay in the air for up to six hours, with a range of at least 180 kilometres. As they land, ground controllers send signals to deploy large parachutes and air bags.

The military wants to use the spy planes, worth $33 million Cdn, to look for accused terrorists. The testing program began about two weeks ago, and was supposed to wrap up by the end of the month.
 

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The Tropics of Canada
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Another Oldie but a goodie


Panel ponders CIA-style spy service for Canada
Updated Thu. Mar. 25 2004 6:52 AM ET

Canadian Press

OTTAWA -- A panel of senior spymasters is quietly mulling the vexing question of whether Canada should create a CIA-style foreign intelligence service.

Newly obtained documents show the high-level panel was asked late last year to determine if Canada is “adequately supplied” with valuable information from around the world.

Many believe the issue of whether Canada's eyes and ears are sufficiently focused on people and events abroad has taken on added urgency since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States.

“Does the government want/need more foreign intelligence?” asks a set of notes prepared for the panel, known as the Security and Intelligence Strategic Review Working Group.

“Would Canada want to follow a New Zealand model, wherein its Security Intelligence Service was given authority to conduct CIA/Secret Intelligence Service-type operations?”

The working group, formed in the spring of 2003, includes senior officials from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the RCMP, and the departments of Foreign Affairs, Immigration and Public Safety.

The group is trying to devise ways members of the intelligence community can function “better together,” said Francois Jubinville, a spokesman for the Privy Council Office, the agency of senior federal advisers that set up the panel. “The work of the group is ongoing.”

PCO released the documents to The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act following a complaint to the federal information commissioner.

Canada's foreign intelligence currently comes from a variety of sources: collection by CSIS within Canada, the diplomatic reporting of Foreign Affairs, signals intelligence collection by the Communications Security Establishment (the country's electronic spy agency) and sharing of data with allies.

The newly obtained notes, prepared last August and September, underscore key questions including:

If Canada created a dedicated foreign intelligence service, which department would it fall under, to which minister would it report and what type of watchdog would it have?
Should this capacity be placed in a new agency, or located within CSIS, Foreign Affairs or another department?
Should Canada model itself after the United States and create a director of central intelligence position that would be the head of the foreign spy service as well as leader of the intelligence community?
One uncertainty is the degree to which CSIS, created in 1984 to protect Canada from terrorists and spies, can meet the country's needs for information about an increasingly dangerous world.

CSIS is permitted under the law to collect intelligence, at home or abroad, in investigating threats to national security such as a possible terrorist attack.

But while it can gather this sort of “security intelligence” anywhere, the spy agency is limited by the CSIS Act to the collection of “foreign intelligence” within Canada. As a result, CSIS could not, for instance, go beyond Canada's borders to collect information on military manoeuvres in another nation.

The strategic review of security and intelligence issues is feeding into a larger exercise to draft a new national security policy. Public Safety Minister Anne McLellan plans to outline the federal approach to the policy in a speech Thursday.

The government announced $605 million in new money for security over five years in the budget Tuesday.

But it's too early to say whether Canada needs to improve its foreign intelligence gathering, said McLellan's spokeswoman, Farah Mohamed.

“We currently feel very confident in the mechanisms that are in place -- they serve us very well,” she said. “But the culture's always changing, you have to make sure that you have to the tools to respond to that culture. That review is ongoing.”
 
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