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@ hkskyline

Why are there too many gritty parts in Hong Kong. I mean, hong Kong is the richest city in Asia (Tokyo, notwithstanding) but it has way more gritty areas than say cities like Singapore or Kuala Lumpur?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Why are there too many gritty parts in Hong Kong. I mean, hong Kong is the richest city in Asia (Tokyo, notwithstanding) but it has way more gritty areas than say cities like Singapore or Kuala Lumpur?
There are a lot of rich people yet there are also a lot of poor people. Some of these gritty areas look poor on the outside, but the insides are very nicely furnished and the land is very valuable. But you're right, a lot of the urban areas of Kowloon need redevelopment, and that is slowly taking place. Expropriation isn't easy, especially since not all the landlords are readily reachable.
 

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@ hkskyline Re: Hong Kong's Gritty Side

^^ Oh ok. But why can't they like make their city as well-looking as say Sydney, Frankfurt, or, even, Vancouver. Even if Hong Kong is a quassi-mega-city with 7 million, such a fact isn't an excuse for being somewhat dirty. Look at Tokyo...it sure hell ain't as gritty as Hong Kong is, though, per capita-wise it's poorer.

But you're right, a lot of the urban areas of Kowloon need redevelopment, and that is slowly taking place. Expropriation isn't easy, especially since not all the landlords are readily reachable.
^^ Kowloon is worse but some parts of Hong Kong Island are have also very gritty areas. Hong Kong Island is such a small place...it's supposedly the "showcase" area of Hong Kong...but even that area has sampans (think: Aberdeen) and rusty old high-rise apartments.
 

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A unique perspective of a unique city.

Thanx for the pix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
^^ Oh ok. But why can't they like make their city as well-looking as say Sydney, Frankfurt, or, even, Vancouver. Even if Hong Kong is a quassi-mega-city with 7 million, such a fact isn't an excuse for being somewhat dirty. Look at Tokyo...it sure hell ain't as gritty as Hong Kong is, though, per capita-wise it's poorer.
Humidity is a major problem that causes building decay. Hong Kong is located right next to the ocean in the hotter parts of the world, and humidity hovers around 70%+ most of the year, so the buildings would decay more quickly. Sydney, Frankfurt, and Vancouver are in drier, more temperate climates, so their buildings don't need as much maintenance.

Although buildings look dirty, they're not cheap to buy. A lot of them are awaiting expropriation, whereby residents try to extort the real estate companies into paying a fortune for their flats.



^^ Kowloon is worse but some parts of Hong Kong Island are have also very gritty areas. Hong Kong Island is such a small place...it's supposedly the "showcase" area of Hong Kong...but even that area has sampans (think: Aberdeen) and rusty old high-rise apartments.
Any city would have older, more established areas. How many cities are made up of buildings all from the last decade? Hong Kong Island is not just a business showcase district, but also a residential district where people live. The architects don't just build something unsustainable to show off. Even New York and London has its stock of old not-so-desirable buildings amidst the showcase wonders.

Hong Kong used to be a fishing village, and that tradition continues today. Aberdeen is one of those fishing villages that have lasted through time and survives today. It's important to remember our heritage. Not everyone gets to work in the glassy towers in Central. It's this diversity that makes Hong Kong interesting.
 

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People often forget that every city has its own gritty parts.

Hell, even my little suburb has old run down parts do it. The old piers by the bridge haven't been maintained.

This is true for any city, Hong Kong included.
 

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Why are there too many gritty parts in Hong Kong. I mean, hong Kong is the richest city in Asia (Tokyo, notwithstanding) but it has way more gritty areas than say cities like Singapore or Kuala Lumpur?
many immigrants from mainland china rushed to hong kong in 1950s-70s due to the political reason and most of them are uneducated and framers, it resulted in a serious problem of mass slum districts, and it led to a huge demand of low quality building to support the abrupt change of poor population

hong kong economy developed rapidly during 70s to 90s and became one of the richest cities in the world, however, the gritty buildings remain, and the value increased dramatically too, it may look gritty outside, but comfortable and livable inside

you just cannot compare hong kong with other traditional rich cities as the backgrounds are ways different
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
many immigrants from mainland china rushed to hong kong in 1950s-70s due to the political reason and most of them are uneducated and framers, it resulted in a serious problem of mass slum districts, and it led to a huge demand of low quality building to support the abrupt change of poor population

hong kong economy developed rapidly during 70s to 90s and became one of the richest cities in the world, however, the gritty buildings remain, and the value increased dramatically too, it may look gritty outside, but comfortable and livable inside

you just cannot compare hong kong with other traditional rich cities as the backgrounds are ways different
Actually, the mass public housing schemes emerged not due to immigration from China, but rather the Shek Kip Mei fire in 1953 that left a whole communiy homeless.

Not all the immigrants from China were poor, uneducated farmers. During WW2 and the subsequent civil war, many Shanghainese businessmen fled to Hong Kong, and rebuilt their fortunes here. Li Ka-shing himself is from southern China as well, and today still speaks Cantonese with an accent. This immigrant business community helped Hong Kong's economic miracle take shape in the 70s and on.
 

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Actually, the mass public housing schemes emerged not due to immigration from China, but rather the Shek Kip Mei fire in 1953 that left a whole communiy homeless.

Not all the immigrants from China were poor, uneducated farmers. During WW2 and the subsequent civil war, many Shanghainese businessmen fled to Hong Kong, and rebuilt their fortunes here. Li Ka-shing himself is from southern China as well, and today still speaks Cantonese with an accent. This immigrant business community helped Hong Kong's economic miracle take shape in the 70s and on.
so i said "most of them" :)
 
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