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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Growing up in the City - Who says the city is not for kids?





Thanks B4mmy!




Quadrangle

Manal Ammar and Salah live right in the heart of Manchester, off Oxford Road, with their two young children, five year old Faris and daughter Hala who is just two.

For the last six months they have been renting a fifth floor, two bedroom apartment at The Quadrangle development and it will be their home until they complete their studies at Manchester University at the end of next year.

And for Manal living close to the university means no long commute and more time to spend doing the city stuff they enjoy.

She said "I think the British have a very closed idea about who should live in the city. We come from Saudia Arabia where lots of families live right in the centre of towns. It is the norm. But back home our apartment had five big rooms, it was a lot bigger and we enjoyed the space.

"Here apartments are much smaller which makes it harder with young children."

The Ammarts are one of four families living at The Quadrangle with small children and Manal says the inner courtyard garden was the clinching factor. She said "We wanted to be close to the university and near schools and a nursery but also needed some space we could just walk out into and there are very few developments in Manchester with decent sized communal gardens.

"The children are used to living in an apartment, they know nothing else but sometimes they need to run around and this is perfect."

In the mornings they drop Hala at a city centre nursery and walk Faris to St Philips Primary School, five minutes away.

Manal said "I pick them up and we often go out into the city in the early evening to eat or go for a walk. We can wander across town to the Science Museum which is free and the art gallery and they love Cathedral Square and we are back home before people start going out for the evening.

We had no trouble registering with a GP in M1 and we prefer to live in the city because everything is here.

The only downside for families is that there are no little parks with play equipment for children like you find on the continent and no play centres."



'Skyline Central'


Play parks will not be a priority for the Griffiths family when they leave their large Georgian house in Blackley for the city centre later this year.

Dad Paul, a GP in north Manchester, wife Sue and daughters Alex, 13 and Ellie, 12 have bought a penthouse apartment at Skyline Central, hte Rochdale Road scheme that will have a swimming pool on the top floor. Paul said, "We have grown out of the family home really the girls don't play in the garden anymore and the upkeep is quite demanding.

"We own a house in Spain which is very rural and remote and like the idea of a place in the city centre which would be a complete contrast.

"We looked at lots of stuff and they were either too far out, like Castlefield or pretty low quality. Then I heard about this West development and it fitted perfectly."

They are paying £420,000 for the top floor of the lower block and persuaded the developers to turn what was to be a storeroom into an extra bedroom for them.

Paul said "There will be a gym three floors below us and a communal garden with hot tub and in the other block they have managed to put in a 20m pool.

"We are all incredibly excited!"



This article pics up on some of the issues needing to be addressed if the city living boom is to be sustainable.

Families are moving into the city of their own accord and seemingly do see Manchester city centre as a viable location to bring up a young family. Encouragingly, whilst the article does pick up on some of the commonly expressed gripes, namely the size of apartments and lack of play-equipped parks for kiddies in the centre, the picture is by no means all bad. The existence of supermarkets, nuseries, GP's and family friendly green spaces and attractions in the centre mean the city centre is becoming a viable option for young families, with the Southern Gateway seeming to be the location of choice.

More must be done, however.

The point about encouraging developers to include communal gardens is a good one.

Whilst progress is being made, the council simply must insist on a greater proportion of larger family sized apartments in all new developments.



How do you see city living evolving?


What are we getting right?


What do we need to improve upon?


What do you perceive to be the best developments and why?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another development in the Southern Gateway (and also at Salford Quays) demonstrating demand for more diverse types of accommodation.

Central living with a sense of community

Jill Burdett

Maybe it's because of their scarcity but suddenly everyone wants a townhouse.

At Salford Quays the second phase of development a decade ago included many three-storey townhouses with garages and gardens. One agent alone has sold nine already this year.

Lawrence Copeland said: "Some had been on the market for several months with little interest, but then all of a sudden they all sold. We only have two left on our books now.

"Interestingly many have gone to people who already live there and to people who will live in them rather than renting them out. This is an established community, so we have seen a lot of trading up. Also I think that people like living in houses and they have realised that there is little else on offer."

Prices at the Quays are cheaper than in the city centre with a four bed, three-storey house at Merchants Quay available for £249,950 and crucially most have at least one dedicated car parking space if not an integral garage.

Bryant made a bold move mixing a row of three storey town houses with the mill conversions and distinct circular Green Building of Macintosh Village and it seems to have paid off. Only one of the eight is left for sale and while it was thought they may have attracted families, all have gone to couples simply looking for more space.

University lecturer Helen Leahy and husband Mike, a consultant at Christie Hospital were among the first to move in last summer and they love their city house. Helen said: "We moved from Leeds and wanted to be in the city centre but also wanted a house. We found this and absolutely love it."

They paid £374,000 for the four-bedroom house, which comes with two secure parking spaces, and consider it was good value for money. Helen said: "We use every inch of space. I have the ground floor for my office and library, the second floor is where we eat and relax, the third is for sleeping and the Mike has his office in the top floor bedroom, which also houses the TV."

"I love being able to watch people walk past, hear children at the nursery next door and the views of the city are wonderful.

"I also like having a front door onto the street. We all know each other and I think it helps a sense of community develop which you would not get in a block of apartments.

"City living is about a mix and I would love to see more townhouses being built."

The last three-bed townhouse with study is for sale at £355,000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An interesting review of the award winning 'Lock Building', once again, in the Southern Gateway area of the city. This by Aidan. http://www.eyeonmanchester.com/index.php/manchester_property/the_lock_apartments_whitworth_st_west/



The Lock Building Apartments Whitworth St West

Sunday, April 02, 2006

The Lock Apartments: The best in contemporary residential architecture with a look of John Lennon

Ever since I stood on the platform of Oxford Rd Station and noticed a new, white aparment building with transparent orange balcony fronts, I’ve been fascinated with The Lock Building. I thought the balcony fronts had an effect of John Lennon’s glasses, trendy, with overtones of the White Album.



The Lock Building Whitworth St West with characteristic orange balcony fronts


Walking along Whitworth St West I noticed the building has many superb exterior design features, which set it apart from its neighbours - The white exterior tiling, the acute angles on the corner, the interestingly shaped vents at the top.

And when I saw the interior, I was even more pleasantly surprised. There’s a ground floor to ceiling atrium, criss-crossed by walkways on every floor. The atrium has open vents at the side, so it’s cold in the winter and airy in the summer.

The apartments were very impressive, with some interesting features: The rooms have a more spacious feel thanks to the higher ceiling - noticeably higher than Whitworth West apartments just up the street. Also, the outer walls are soundproofed, so the noise of the traffic and the trains is almost completely blocked out, Actually I love the sound of trains, and a great place for trainspotting is out on the balcony. It’s a little scary as you can look down through the slats. The view over Oxford Road station and down towards MMU is..., well, not quite the Bay of Naples, but it’s typically Manchester, and most residents will agree.. very nice indeed. You can brighten up a dull Manchester day by looking through the orange transparent balcony front.



The Lock Apartments (centre) overlooking the canal behind Whitworth Street West

The price of the two bedroomed apartment is just short of £200,000. I will add details about service charge and parking arrangements to this feature shortly.

The Lock Building EOM’s verdict: The most eye-catching residential building in Manchester, well appointed apartments with a spacious feel, great location, what more could you ask?

The Lock Apartments is a development by Dandara. Visit their webiste at ************

Back down on Whitworth Street, I was surprised to look in an estate agents window and find that a two bedroomed apartment in the Lock Building available for rent at a suprisingly low £550 pounds per calendar month. Tempting. But this is only the second property I’ve looked at and there are still scores to see.. I think I’ll wait…
 

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I just drove past Lock at about 9pm tonight and I cant help thinking those balconys are never gonna get used... the streets too busy and... I dunno, they do look ORANGE don't they? Anyone else seen it at night?
 

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b4mmy said:
I just drove past Lock at about 9pm tonight and I cant help thinking those balconys are never gonna get used... the streets too busy and... I dunno, they do look ORANGE don't they? Anyone else seen it at night?
No.

BTW, the Lock is by far Dandara's best building to date in Manchester.
 

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Orange is a very manchester colour and specifically a Whitworth street colour.
Where would we be without International Orange?

From the Ben Kelly website:
"It’s very fitting that International Orange was used in The Hacienda as it’s an active, creative and exhuberant colour, between the passion of red and the mental stimulation of yellow. Orange is full of energy and will always be used to promote vibrant optimism."
 

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The Longford said:
Orange is a very manchester colour and specifically a Whitworth street colour.
Where would we be without International Orange?

From the Ben Kelly website:
"It’s very fitting that International Orange was used in The Hacienda as it’s an active, creative and exhuberant colour, between the passion of red and the mental stimulation of yellow. Orange is full of energy and will always be used to promote vibrant optimism."
**** me 'shanks.... you are a bloody genius with that google!
 

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b4mmy said:
I saw that. Why was it the last one?
Chris (caw123) doesn't want to moderate it anymore, and, although several people have said they'd do his duties, the moderators can't decide - or won't decide. However, it'll be back ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Inner City Regeneration - Higher Broughton




Higher Broughton Regeneration

40 acres Housing Market Renewal
500 new homes
New schools
Community Hub facilities
Frontage mixed use development



For more information, please also see the Broughton Green website

The Project

The City of Salford Council identified an area of some 29-acres in need of inward investment and physical regeneration. WIthin this area the council wished to create a successful, sustainable and multicultural community.

Broughton Green is a mixed use residential led development that is being undertaken by The Higher Broughton Partnership LP – an innovative public/private sector collaboration comprising Salford City Council, Royal Bank of Scotland, Inpartnership and residential developer City Spirit.

Within and around the Higher Broughton Masterplan area there are valuable resources, which merit support and enhancement. The people of the area form a diverse community, many of whom are well established and committed to the locality. The master-planning team of Edaw and Church Lukas, have considered different ways of better utilising the area’s resources in terms of physical fabric and facilities to improve the quality of life for those living in and those accessing the area. The revitalised Higher Broughton neighbourhood is being transformed into an attractive, high profile ‘gateway’ with accessible residential accommodation in an attractive environment.

To enable close-knit communities to flourish, the scheme is being developed in ‘Homezones’, each incorporating a range of approximately 20 to 30 apartments and houses. The residential streets are being designed with families in mind, ensuring there are multiple outside spaces and spacious internal dimensions.

The majority of the first release of four, five, six and seven bedroom houses and one and two bedroom apartments have been sold off-plan. This overwhelming vote of confidence from local buyers has demonstrated that Broughton Green is meeting its principal target of providing much needed new homes for those already living in the community.

The development partnership have spent considerable time analysing the needs of the local population and designing groundbreaking new homes that will meet their wide-ranging needs. The first residents will be able to take occupancy of their new homes as early as the summer of this year (2006).




Higher Broughton Master Plan - Phase I plan





Higher Broughton - Phase I public square





Higher Broughton - 3D housing diagram






Higher Broughton's revival takes shape

Dianne Bourne


THE transformation of a run-down area of Salford into a landmark new community is finally taking shape, with construction work now underway.

Phase one of the £120million Broughton Green residential development in Higher Broughton has begun - and the developer has this week reported that early buyers who have snapped up homes off-plan will be able to move into their new home within the next 12 months.

Since the launch of the scheme last Summer, when 95 per cent of the initial release was snapped up within a matter of days, three out of a total of six phases have since been launched to the market, with 75 per cent already sold off-plan.


It's something of a success story for the developers of the site, the Higher Broughton Partnership, an innovative collaboration between private and public sector partners Salford City Council, Royal Bank of Scotland, national regeneration specialists Inpartnership and developer City Spirit.

Rather than designing a scheme based on typical house-types that are rolled out by housebuilders, the partnership has instead spent time analysing the needs of the local population and designing groundbreaking new homes that will meet their needs.

Variety

This means an unusual variety of homes on the site, ranging from one-bedroom apartments to seven-bedroom houses.

Prices range from £110,000 up to just under £500,000 for the largest properties, reflecting the increasing confidence in the Salford housing market.

Now, as construction work at the scheme has started, the partnership has released the next batch of new homes.

John Corstorphine of the Higher Broughton Partnership said: "We are delighted that national contractor, Taylor Woodrow, is making such a swift and effective start to the £29million build programme and it is reassuring to see our transformation of Higher Broughton kicking off so positively.

"Now that everyone can see the first phase of the scheme taking shape, we have taken the opportunity to release a further 30 new houses and apartments onto the market in a move to sign-up more buyers at this off-plan stage."

Located off Bury New Road, around two miles from Manchester city centre, the design ethos of the 30-acre Broughton Green scheme is to create family orientated residential `play streets', a number of outside spaces and spacious interiors.

The new release at Broughton Green includes apartments priced from £115,000 for a one-bedroom design, rising to £225,000 for a spacious 1,184 sq ft two-bedroom apartment.

In contrast new four, five, six and seven-bedroom houses have been added onto the price list from £245,995 to £474,995.

Cllr John Merry, leader of Salford city council said: " "Broughton Green is just one of a number of similar schemes across the city that show how Salford is changing to become a place in which people choose to live and work."

To enable close-knit communities to flourish, the scheme is being developed in `Homezones', each incorporating a range of approximately 20 to 30 apartments and houses. It is being heralded as a UK-wide benchmark.

Future phases will include affordable new houses, which the Partnership will offer to existing homeowners in the regeneration area.

The development has been aided by kick-start funding from the Manchester & Salford Housing Market Renewal Fund Pathfinder scheme, one of only nine Pathfinders in the UK to have its Housing Market Renewal proposals accepted by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minster.

The Broughton Green on-site marketing suite is located at Newbury Place, off Bury New Road, for more information call 0161 792 7671, or contact sole selling agents DTZ Residential on 0161 839 9122

...The 30-acre Broughton Green scheme is creating a wide range of innovatively-designed new homes situated around family orientated residential play streets and new public open spaces. Each new home has design-led kitchens and bathrooms, which are being supplied by national specialist CP Hart and incorporate brands such as Philippe Stark, Duravit and Hansgrohe.

Three new multi-use grassed sports fields and two hard courts are programmed to be created as part of the first phase of Broughton Green, bordered by Devonshire Street, Tully Street and Vincent Street. Newbury Place, which fronts onto Bury New Road is also due to be redeveloped.

Broughton Green is also set to incorporate a £7m community recreational facility at Wellington Street East, which is likely to include a new library, training facilities, a children's centre, services for the elderly and changing facilities for the sports fields.
 

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Cowboy of Love
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Nice to see poor people being kicked out of their houses so half a million pound houses can be built in their place.

I'll not hold my breath for the 'affordable' housing.
 

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Less is more.
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No sleepy he's right, the people that lived there before certainly won't be able to live there again, I've heard (on the Broughton grapevine) that most of these new super duper houses have been bought up by the Tel Aviv massive from Leicester Road. It's unlikely the previous residents will be able to afford these.
 
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