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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In the Persia (Fars) province of Iran, there were two major city plans, one of them was Iranian but another one had probably a Greek origin, the Greek one is Hippodamian Plan which is enough famous, the ancient city of Bishapur had this plan, some pics from Google Map:



















But original Iranian cities had a circular plan, in fact the suffix "-gard/-gerd" in the Persian cities, means "round or circular place" and comes from the Persian verb gardidan "to encircle", so Darabgerd means "ROUND City of Darab".

Some pics of Darabgerd in the south of modern Darab:











Another famous round city in Persia is the ancient city of Gur, the first capital of Sassanid Empire, that is a very precise 2 kilometers diameter circle with an originally 60 meters high tower at the center.









Ruin of the tower:



Reconstruction pics:

















 

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Persian King of Kings
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
another persian thread ?
Did Persian just design plan for cities? I have rarely posted any Persian thread but my posts are mostly about buildings in my country.
 

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I think that not only the Persians used a cirkle model for a city map.
Western Roman Empire was brought almost the whole Europe the same model (all streets lead to the center - Rome is the best example).
Later, the French promoted the model of the cross where the streets intersect at right angles, the broad avenue, infinitely long.
 

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Canberra, Australia

"Following an international contest for the city's design, a blueprint by the Chicago architects Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin was selected and construction commenced in 1913. The Griffins' plan featured geometric motifs such as circles, hexagons and triangles, and was centered around axes aligned with significant topographical landmarks in the Australian Capital Territory."


Aerial view of the city




Highlighted streets

 

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Barcelona's famous Cerda plan for the city extension (Eixample).

One of the things that I love about Barcelona is the contrast between the old medieval alleys of the old town (partly visible in the bottom) and the new grand boulevards with grand buildings in the Eixample since the area has become famous for the hundredths of Modernist buildings.

From (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ildefons_Cerdà). Cerda focused on key needs: chiefly, the need for sunlight, natural lighting and ventilation in homes (he was heavily influenced by the sanitarian movement), the need for greenery in people's surroundings, the need for effective waste disposal including good sewerage, and the need for seamless movement of people, goods, energy, and information.
His designs belie a network-oriented approach far ahead of his time. His street layout and grid plan were optimized to accommodate pedestrians, carriages, horse-drawn trams, urban railway lines (as yet unheard-of), gas supply and large-capacity sewers to prevent frequent floods, without neglecting public and private gardens and other key amenities. The latest technical innovations were incorporated in his designs if they could further the cause of better integration, but he also came up with remarkable new concepts of his own, including a logical system of land readjustment that was essential to the success of his project, and produced a thorough statistical analysis of working-class conditions at the time, which he undertook in order to demonstrate the ills of congestion

Original plan:


The plan versus reality:


The Eixample now:


The source of the images:
http://www.planum.net/4bie/main/m-4bie-barcelona.htm
 

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Some great contributions. The new cities (except maybe Canberra) all have a grid pattern, those old Persian circular city designs are really intriguing.
 

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Indianapolis Original plan


Today
 

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Glasgow before expansion, a medieval town concentrated along a few streets between the river and the cathedral up the hill


And in the mid 19th century, the new grid system taking up most of the new central expansion. Most of the old town was completely wiped out by the end of the century.
 

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Buenos Aires

nice pics!

Buenos Aires was founded two times

- first in 1536 by Pedro de Mendoza with the name of Nuestra Señora del Buen Ayre
- but in 1541 receive orders to withdraw from the zone
- was founded again by Juan de Garay in 1580 with the name of Ciudad de la Santísima Trinidad y Puerto de los Buenos Aires


detail: Buenos Aires is not the first city founded in Argentina, it was Santiago del Estero in 1553, Mendoza 1561, San Juan 1562, San Miguel de Tucumán 1565, Córdoba 1570, Santa Fé 1573 and Buenos Aires 1580. All actual capitals of his respectives provinces.

1580


1608


1713


1750


1800 - Population: around 26.000 habitants


1850


1856


1858


1859


1882


1928


1997


actual




pic credits to: http://www.la-floresta.com.ar and http://www.hollywoodsuitesba.com.ar :)
 
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