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Another RussianDatingScam
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a former taxidriver of Stockholm for 6 years, I drove a lot but still after those years I had trouble finding my way correctly through some of the oneway streets of Venice of the North.








Which City has the highest number of oneway streets ?

Btw I have read about a taxidriver in Paris, he worked over 20 years and still there were neighbourhoods he never had visited.

What about oneway/ deadend streets in Manhattan, Houston, Boston or Ljubliana ? Are there many of them. I have read that the lower Manhattan is a difficult part of town for drivers.
 

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like the one in Hamilton Ontario... the one way street system there was/is very efficient at moving traffic but was a major contributor to the degredation of the downtown core.
 

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A lot of European cities use one-way streets in combination with complicated and inconsistent street patterns to keep cars out of residential streets and channel traffic on main thoroughfares. It's a sort of urban NIMBYism.
In Budapest it is not used for confusing foreigners but parking is enabled in all streets both sides so the remaining space is not enough for two cars.
 

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Deadpan Snarker
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What about oneway/ deadend streets in Manhattan, Houston, Boston or Ljubliana ? Are there many of them. I have read that the lower Manhattan is a difficult part of town for drivers.
As Chris said, one-way streets are easy with a consistent grid. Which is why they work in most of Manhattan. Since the streets that run east and west are numbered, there's even a mnemonic (a memory trick): "east even, otherwise odd" - meaning even-numbered streets go east, odd-numbered streets go west. The only thing to remember is that there are a few main streets that are wider than the others and have two-way traffic (14th, 23d, 34th, 42d, 57th.... there doesn't seem to be any logic to the pattern). The lower part of Manhattan was developed in the 17th and 18th centuries, before the grid plan was adopted, with lots of narrow streets and a less organized layout. (Personally - I grew up 20 miles from New York and have spent all my life on the east coast so I know my way around fairly well - the part of Manhattan I find most disorienting, for some reason, is the West Village.) The city council adopted the grid plan about 1810 as the pattern for future development as the city grew northward.

Look at any map of Manhattan and the difference is obvious.
 

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pooh bear
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Boston has a lot of one-way streets, but it's a small city so once out of the core, traffic flow isn't too bad
 

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Another RussianDatingScam
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As Chris said, one-way streets are easy with a consistent grid. Which is why they work in most of Manhattan. Since the streets that run east and west are numbered, there's even a mnemonic (a memory trick): "east even, otherwise odd" - meaning even-numbered streets go east, odd-numbered streets go west. The only thing to remember is that there are a few main streets that are wider than the others and have two-way traffic (14th, 23d, 34th, 42d, 57th.... there doesn't seem to be any logic to the pattern). The lower part of Manhattan was developed in the 17th and 18th centuries, before the grid plan was adopted, with lots of narrow streets and a less organized layout. (Personally - I grew up 20 miles from New York and have spent all my life on the east coast so I know my way around fairly well - the part of Manhattan I find most disorienting, for some reason, is the West Village.) The city council adopted the grid plan about 1810 as the pattern for future development as the city grew northward.

Look at any map of Manhattan and the difference is obvious.
Is this system of naming streets 14th, 23d, 34th, 42d, 57th street something unique for New York ?

Must be quite easy to study the streets of NY to become a taxidriver. Manhattan has a squarelike net of straight streets and most streets have numbers instead of names.
 

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Another RussianDatingScam
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
In Budapest it is not used for confusing foreigners but parking is enabled in all streets both sides so the remaining space is not enough for two cars.
Yes, same thing with the Stockholm-Uptown "Horror-Street" Grevgatan a narrow oneway street packed with cars on both sides. It was impossible to make a stop on that street because if I stopped I was at the same time blocking the passing traffic.

So..as a cabdriver waiting for a customer at Grevgatan sometimes you had to drive around the whole block a couple of times while waiting for the customers so you didn't block the street. It really was the last street where you wanted a pickup.:bash:

WoW, Barcelona looks like city difficult to navigate, worst I ever saw.
 
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