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After War, Lawrence of Arabia, joined RAF as Technician. Here he is seen at AirMen Mess RAF , Drigh Road, Karachi.



https://twitter.com/HiggsBosan/status/444686657577820160/photo/1
Old habbits die hard.

After Karachi, he set up his camp in Lahore's Anarkali Bazar as an Islamic scholar - remember guys, he was a jasoos in Saudi Arabia against the Ottoman Empire: hence he spoke Arabic.
So with his good looks (haha) and Arabic knowledge he started fooling the people of Lahore as a peer-faqeer. Of course, our avaam were jahil then as they are now, and they fell for him. Even some Lahori masjid's imam gave his daughter to Lawrence bhai in marriage.

I don't know how, but people eventually found out that he was an angraiz jaasoos masquerading as an aalim-faazil. They took him out of his home and started thrashing him. British governor in Lahore found out and let him escape from Lahore. The people did make sure that he divorced his wife.
That girl then was remarried to Sher-e-Kashmir Shaikh Abdullah. Farooq Abudllah, the vazeer-e-aalaa of Indian Kashmir is her son.
 

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Old habbits die hard.

After Karachi, he set up his camp in Lahore's Anarkali Bazar as an Islamic scholar - remember guys, he was a jasoos in Saudi Arabia against the Ottoman Empire: hence he spoke Arabic.
So with his good looks (haha) and Arabic knowledge he started fooling the people of Lahore as a peer-faqeer. Of course, our avaam were jahil then as they are now, and they fell for him. Even some Lahori masjid's imam gave his daughter to Lawrence bhai in marriage.

I don't know how, but people eventually found out that he was an angraiz jaasoos masquerading as an aalim-faazil. They took him out of his home and started thrashing him. British governor in Lahore found out and let him escape from Lahore. The people did make sure that he divorced his wife.
That girl then was remarried to Sher-e-Kashmir Shaikh Abdullah. Farooq Abudllah, the vazeer-e-aalaa of Indian Kashmir is her son.
Wow, cool story.

I've read in many different places about there being training schools in Britain even a 100 years ago where they trained their agents on how to pass as a Muslim. They had one academy where actors roamed around in Muslim clothes behaving exactly like Muslims, speaking in local languages, and even debating finer points of sharia.

At one time they had clones of all Muslim rulers at this academy where the actors were so well trained that it was claimed that if you asked them a question they would give you an answer that was 90% accurate compared to the king they were acting like.

This strategy was used to break up the Ottoman empire and the whole Muslim world, including Muslim India.
 

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Wow, cool story.

I've read in many different places about there being training schools in Britain even a 100 years ago where they trained their agents on how to pass as a Muslim. They had one academy where actors roamed around in Muslim clothes behaving exactly like Muslims, speaking in local languages, and even debating finer points of sharia.

At one time they had clones of all Muslim rulers at this academy where the actors were so well trained that it was claimed that if you asked them a question they would give you an answer that was 90% accurate compared to the king they were acting like.

This strategy was used to break up the Ottoman empire and the whole Muslim world, including Muslim India.
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There is a story similar to yours in autobiography of Navab Saeed Ahmed Chhattari where he describes being taken to one such school outside of London by his English friend.
 

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Image from page 449 of "Electric railway journal" (1908)

Text Appearing Before Image:
hange of power had been going on since the year 1909, when the first experimental equipment of the new type was placed in service. The car, as shown in the accompanying halftone, has been reduced to the simplest possible form. The motor is placed underneath a permanent seat in the center of the car and is connected bv a chain drive to one of the axles. maintenance, while the horse cars previously in use, which seated only thirty passengers, used to cost slightly over 6 cents per car mile. The same report states that the introduction of gasoline cars has produced a material increase in traffic, largely on account of their popularity with the natives and their ability to provide a much more speedy and regular service. In view of this the directors at present are contemplating extensions for the development of the outlying districts of Karachi amounting to some 3 miles of new line. It is reported that the new cars run about as fast and asquietly as the average electric surface car, and on account



Text Appearing After Image:
Gasoline Motor Cars in India—View of Cars in Service, Showing Native Motormen and Conductors Hand brakes are used and the entire construction of the car is made as simple and as light as possible, the roof being of the canopy type supported by iron stanchions. The engine is controlled from the ends of the car by a simple arrangement of rods and levers which operate the clutch and thethrottle. The levers are located just back of the dash-boards. The motor is set at right angles to the center lineof the car so that no necessity for beveled gearing exists, of the location of the motor in the center of the car, where it is fully supported by springs, the vibration customarywith the gasoline engine drive is largely eliminated. The simplicity of operation has permitted the company to utilize the natives who formerly drove the horse cars as motormen for the new motor cars. The installation at Karachi includes thirty motor cars, of which all have been in operation during the past year, and it

https://flic.kr/p/ocFqN4
 

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Image from page 449 of "Electric railway journal" (1908)

The sign at the back says: Bolton Market.



Text Appearing After Image:
Gasoline Motor Cars in India—Type of Car Used Exclusively on Street Railways of Karachi and in consequence the cars are reported to run with very little noise. The report of the East India Tramways Company covering its lines in Karachi states that the new motor cars,which seat forty-six passengers, are operated at an average cost of only 3 cents per car mile for power, repairs and railways of Baroda, India, are soon to be equipped with cars of the same type owing to their successful introduction in the former city. Karachi is one of the principal seaports of India. It has a population of more than 100,000 and has been largely rebuilt and greatly improved. 428 ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL [Vol. XLI, No. io. INAUGURAL CONFERENCE OF THE SOCIETY FOR ELECTRICAL DEVELOPMENT The conference which the Society for Electrical Development, Inc., held in the United Engineering Societies Building, New York, on March 4 and 5 was the first tangible result presented to the electrical industry at large of ava...

https://flic.kr/p/otX1GN
 

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Bashirzilla
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Karachi’s Golden Era

http://forpakistan.org/fpdata/karachis-golden-era/

Once Upon a Time in Karachi: Snapshots from a time when the cinemas were packed and the booze flowed.


Pictured above is Ibrahim Ismail Chundrigar Road (formerly McLeod Road), in Karachi’s financial district. Most of the international embassies and business headquarters are now located along this road, along with internationally franchised restaurants. During the 1970s, the cafes along Chundrigar Road were populated by activists who congregated to discuss politics and social issues.


With 18 murders and violent deaths in just the past few days, Karachi is living up to its reputation for being one of the world’s most dangerous cities — a teeming den of ethnic violence and decades-long bloody political feuds. With more than 13 million people living in this South Asian metropolis, the nerve center of Pakistan’s culture and commerce, life today often means squeaking out an existence amid an urban chaos, punctuated by roadside bombs, bus explosions, and shootings by militants affiliated with the Taliban and al Qaeda. Last summer, in July alone, some 300 people were gunned down across the city in a spate of targeted killings. But the Karachi of the 1960s and 1970s was a much different place. The city became a stop on the “Hippie Trail,” a popular route that led bohemians from Britain and the United States across Asia on their search for enlightenment. With the influx of Westerners before the country’s takeover by Gen. Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in 1977, Karachi enjoyed a period of relative permissiveness, with nightclubs, bars, cinemas, and restaurants hosting the city’s vibrant nightlife. Here’s a special collection of photographs from that time, courtesy of the Citizen’s Archive of Pakistan, a non-profit organization dedicated to cultural and historical preservation.
Above, a Karachi family poses for a photo. The woman, sporting short hair, a sleeveless dress, and sunglasses, appears to be taking fashion cues from American first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, who visited Karachi herself in the 1960s.


Women and children play in front of a merry-go-round. Amusement parks in Karachi — such as Playland, a park that featured bumper cars and a roller coaster — were popular with the city’s inhabitants. Long-time Karachi residents still reminisce about visits to Playland as children.


Sind Club, the oldest in Karachi, opened its doors in 1871 as an exclusively European gentlemen’s club. After Pakistan gained independence in 1947, the club was opened to Pakistani elites. The club featured a billiards room, tennis court, squash court, walking track, sauna, and even a bakery. Once a year, women were invited to the Sind Club for its annual ball.
Nightclubs in Karachi — among them the Playboy, Excelsior, and Oasis — were a big draw in the 1960s and 1970s, and most of them were much less exclusive than the gentlemen’s club at Sind. Dancing and booze kept club-goers entertained. But in 1977, alcohol was banned and all nightclubs were ordered to shut down.


Sea View Beach, a silver-sand beach in the Clifton resort area, was a popular resort and tourist destination in the 1970s. Hotels popped up throughout the district to accommodate beach visitors, and they were always packed. Camel rides on the beach, as pictured above, were a common tourist attraction at Sea View. In fact, Jackie Kennedy’s visit to Karachi included a camel ride.


Similarly, Pakistan theaters once enjoyed an element of freedom. Established in 1947, the Nishat Cinema was one of Karachi’s most popular theaters and the first to offer air-conditioning. It screened only Urdu films until 1972, when it was renovated and began showing some English-language movies on its new big screen. Pakistan’s film industry thrived until the 1980s, when Zia-ul-Haq’s censorship policies forced many theaters to shut down.
Nishat Cinema survived the reform years, but eventually closed in 2004 as the number of movie-goers dwindled.


Merewether Tower is another British Raj-era landmark in Karachi, named after Gen. William L. Merewether, who served as commissioner of Sindh, the province’s highest governing official, from 1867 to 1877. (Merewether was also a founding member and president of the Sind gentlemen’s club.)


The Karachi Race Course was built in 1913, when Pakistan was under British rule. Pictured above is a racehorse on the original track, located behind the Cantonment Railway Station, Karachi’s main train hub. Horse racing and casinos flourished in Karachi during the 1970s, before gambling was banned. Still, the new Karachi Course, built in 1989, holds several races each week.


But even in the 1970s, at the height of Western tourism, there was simmering conflict. Above is the Port of Karachi — the country’s largest and busiest deep water port, and a critical locus on East-West trade routes for centuries. In 1971, ships along the port suffered damage in the war with India, and in 1972, protests broke out among laborers in the industrial areas surrounding the port. When workers occupied the factories, police opened fire on the demonstrators, killing several.


Karachi’s Hill Park, built in the late 1960s as a spot for family recreation, was famous for its picnics and outdoor movie screenings. Hill Park still exists: It remains a popular attraction swarmed with visitors on the weekends, although the mood changed after a theme park and fast food restaurants were built in the 1990s. Today, much of what’s left of the graceful, open Karachi is but a memory.


Women and children enjoy themselves on a ferris wheel. Such amusements are hard to come by in today’s Karachi: Playland was dismantled in 2007 to make space for a public park commissioned by President Pervez Musharraf.


A man walks along the Jahangir Kothari Parade, a promenade built in the 1920s near the resort district of Clifton Beach. The project, which was named for its commissioner, was a gift to the city of Karachi from one of the country’s most prominent philanthropists. The residential part of Clifton is where the former Pakistani president Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto lived with his family.


With the Hippie Trail generating so many word-of-mouth tourists by the beginning of the 1970s, the Pakistani government created an official Tourism Ministry in 1972. Cheap hotels sprang up throughout the city to accommodate Western tourists on a backpacker’s budget, and hotel restaurants became a popular gathering place to enjoy alcohol and live music.


Frere Hall, a British Raj-era building built in 1865, was the site of public town hall meetings until Pakistan gained independence in 1947. It later became a hub for Karachi’s social and cultural activities, housing many of the city’s concerts and theatrical performances. Jazz shows became very popular in 1970s Karachi, and local pop artists enjoyed broad audiences.


A coastal city on the Arabian Sea, fishing has always been an important part of Karachi’s economy. In the 1970s and 1980s, world consumption of fish skyrocketed and boosted incomes in the city. The shark fin trade around the Arabian Sea has also been a lucrative industry for decades. In this photo, Pakistani fishermen haul sharks onto the deck of their boat.


Karachi’s City Court stands on the busy Jinnah Road. The court building, which was built in 1868, served as a jail until it was converted to judicial quarters in 1906. Nadeem F. Paracha, a cultural history blogger for Pakistan’s media outlet Dawn, writes that crime was much less prevalent in 1970′s Karachi. Unlike today, gun violence and drug usage in the city was very low. He quotes a long-time Karachi librarian, who said: “There used to be infamous ghoondas. But they were nothing compared to the hooligans of today. Young men used to get into drunken brawls and gang fights, mostly over women and politics, but guns were hardly ever used. They used fists, knifes, chains … but nobody ever knew what a TT pistol or a Kalashnikov was.”


Scottish Presbyterian missionaries built St. Andrews Church in 1868 on land issued by the British government. Only Europeans congregated at St. Andrews until 1947; after independence, in 1969, the church began conducting Urdu services for Pakistani Christians. St. Andrews merged with the Church of Pakistan in the 1970s, combining the Methodists, Lutherans, Presbyterians, and Anglicans into one entity. Protestants in Pakistan were largely undisturbed until the end of the 1970s, when Zia-ul-Haq began implementing Islamic reforms that led to the persecution and marginalization of Christians. Today, Protestants in Sindh Province (where Karachi is located), make up less than 1 percent of the population.
 
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