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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Sherwin-Williams confirms plans for new downtown Cleveland HQ, Brecksville R&D center

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- The Sherwin-Williams Co. confirmed Thursday morning that it is planning a new downtown Cleveland headquarters and a research and development center in Brecksville, in a set of projects expected to bring hundreds of new jobs and a corporate investment of at least $600 million to Cuyahoga County.

In a news release, the company said that its new, 1-million-square-foot headquarters will rise from parking lots just west of Public Square, a short walk from Sherwin-Williams’ longtime home at the historic Landmark Office Towers.The R&D center, which will replace the company’s downtown Breen Technology Center and a facility in Warrensville Heights, will be the 500,000-square-foot anchor for the redevelopment of a former U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital property off Interstate 77 in Brecksville.

“Our plans to continue investing in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio build on our 154-year legacy as one of the region’s top employers and drivers of economic activity,” John Morikis, the company’s chairman and chief executive officer, said in the news release. “Driven by our continued need to serve our customers at the highest level and retain and attract top talent, we intend to create a next-generation workplace environment that ignites creativity, collaboration and industry-leading innovation.”

The company won’t move into the new buildings until 2023, at the earliest. And Sherwin-Williams noted that its plans are contingent on various approvals, including an incentive package that is sure to involve participation from both cities, the county and the state.
 

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Yeah, I'm confused about where even the rough numbers are coming from, because the source material doesn't speak of it, and I don't see the massing model, above. In fact, the article says:

Though Sherwin-Williams outlined the sites where it intends to locate, the company did not provide descriptions or images of planned office buildings or research facilities. Any such plans will require public reviews and approvals, including vetting by design-review committees and the Cleveland City Planning Commission.

The downtown parking lots earmarked for the headquarters project are zoned to allow towers as tall as 900 feet.
It sounds like this could be very tall, by right, but certainly not over a 1,000 feet without special approvals.

After what happened with the Nucleus and maybe the Hudson Site in Detroit, I'm very skeptical of early ambitious plans, quite frankly.
 

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Yeah, I'm confused about where even the rough numbers are coming from, because the source material doesn't speak of it, and I don't see the massing model, above. In fact, the article says:

It sounds like this could be very tall, by right, but certainly not over a 1,000 feet without special approvals.

After what happened with the Nucleus and maybe the Hudson Site in Detroit, I'm very skeptical of early ambitious plans, quite frankly.
Especially since 1 million sq. ft. can be a 12-story building that occupies an entire city block of 90,000 square feet. But hey, I'd love to see another tall building in Cleveland's skyline!
 

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Case in point, the 15-story One Campus Martius building in downtown Detroit, which is 1.088 million square feet and undergoing a 300,000 square foot expansion.



https://twitter.com/BacktoDetroit/status/1230106020904603648

I too want this to be a signature skyscraper, but I'm not seeing anything in the source material pointing at that - let alone a 1,000-footer - unless the poster knows something he didn't post.
 

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As a person who follows the Cleveland thread, the latest news (from November 2019) was the downtown project will be a "campus" like development consisting of several mid to high rise buildings covering 3 square blocks, but none exceeding 40 stories. The tallest , however, will likely be closest to Public Square:

(https://neo-trans.blogspot.com/2019/11/two-sources-sherwin-williams-chooses.html
 

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The opening rendering was a fanciful tease offered as a lure to Amazon to illustrate what might be possible in Cleveland. It has nothing to do with Sherwin-Williams.

Any S-W tower will most likely be much more modest in height.

What is fact from that company is 1) that they have acquired the Jacobs and Weston blocks (from Public Square to W6th Street and Superior Ave to Frankfort at the Square
and Superior to St. Clair Avenue from W3rd to W6th and 2) that their headquarters requirement is in excess of 1 million square feet.

More concrete information is probably 2-3 months away.
 

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One of the towers will likely be taller than Well's Fargo in Minneapolis, and in general the project will be a much better design. Cleveland's approval process is definitely more rigorous/assertive in examining the aesthetics of a building's design. In Minneapolis, our Planning Commission has more of a tendency to rubber stamp a project as long as it meets the minimum requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sherwin-Williams buys downtown land


The Sherwin-Williams Co. (NYSE: SHW) became the new owner of land on Cleveland Public Square and the Superblock west of it for a total of $49 million on Wednesday, March 18.

That's the tale told by online Cuyahoga County property records.

The Cleveland-based paint and coatings maker spoke with its wallet to say it was preparing to proceed on the site for its proposed million-square-foot global headquarters downtown.

The closing marked a key point in the massive manufacturer, distributor and retailer's search that began last September to replace its home of 90 years at 101 W. Prospect Ave.


Some trust must have developed the past few months between Sherwin-Williams and local and state governments for the land deal to close. Some big pieces of the financial incentive package remain to be satisfied.

Cleveland City Council is scheduled on Monday, March 23 to give final approval to the tax inducements for the company — a surprising element of risk for a company that has proceeded in textbook fashion in its quest for a new corporate headquarters. The state's financial incentives through the JobsOhio economic development organization also remain a mystery.

However, one big slug of bucks was set as Cuyahoga County Council approved its $14 million economic development grant for the project Monday, March 16.

Sherwin-Williams has said that it will construct a headquarters costing an estimated $600 million on the site. It will have about 3,500 workers in the downtown complex, most but all moving from its headquarters a few blocks away.

The set of three transactions marked the end of three decades of waiting for a buyer needing a skyscraper by Public Square West, the company formed to hold the land by late shopping mall and office developers Richard and David Jacobs.

Sherwin-Williams paid $9.2 million for the Jacobs site on the west side of Public Square, according to county records. Richard Jacobs in 1989 told the City Club of Cleveland that the company had invested about $50 million in the property.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
JobsOhio approves $37.5 million in grants for Sherwin-Williams’ new HQs and R&D facility

JobsOhio has inked deals with the Sherwin-Williams Co. for $37.5 million in grants to support the global paint maker’s planned headquarters and research and development projects in Cuyahoga County.
The statewide economic-development corporation disclosed the grants Monday, in a roundup of March deals posted on its website. The money will flow to Sherwin-Williams after construction starts on the projects, as reimbursement for costs associated with building new corporate offices in downtown Cleveland’s Warehouse District and a new R&D complex on a former hospital site in Brecksville.
The package unveiled Monday clearly isn’t the state’s complete offering for Sherwin-Williams, which announced in early February that it would stay true to its Ohio roots after a national site search. Amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, which has put legislative approvals for new spending on hold, it could be months before the total public pledge to the company is clear.
The JobsOhio incentives include a $32.5 million economic development grant and a $5 million revitalization grant. But the organization, a nonprofit corporation funded by profits on state liquor sales, notably hasn’t announced any Sherwin-Williams funding tied to workforce development – another tool JobsOhio uses to assist growing companies.

 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Sherwin-Williams HQ may be city's fourth-tallest tower



Sherwin-Williams' (SHW) proposed headquarters tower on Cleveland's Public Square may be a little taller than previously reported. In fact, it could end up being the city's fourth-tallest skyscraper. It's still unlikely to be a supertall approaching 1,000 feet or even Terminal Tower's height, however.

According to two sources, they told NEOtrans that SHW's new HQ on the west side of Public Square will rival 200 Public Square on the opposite side of downtown Cleveland's central commons. That tower is 45 stories and 658 feet tall. It is Cleveland's third-tallest building.

The former Sohio/BP America headquarters is nearly filled by other corporate tenants today including the fast-growing law firm Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff and the recently merged Cleveland Cliffs-AK Steel headquarters that will reportedly add up to 1,000 new jobs to 200 Public Square.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Cleveland City Council approves tax incentives to help Sherwin-Williams build its new headquarters

City Council on Wednesday approved a tax financing package to help Sherwin-Williams Co. develop a $300-million world headquarters off Cleveland’s Public Square.

The package, known as tax increment financing, will allow Sherwin-Williams to divert money it would have paid in new property taxes toward financing of the building. It will be finalized once signed by Mayor Frank Jackson.

The complex, planned to be about 1 million square feet, is expected to retain 3,100 jobs in the downtown and generate about $8.6 million in income taxes for the city annually.

 

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Large plots for parking has to be the worst use of private/public property for a downtown in the 21st century. Cleveland needs to rebuild these plots to make the downtown more walker/biker friendly.
Sherwin Williams has acquired 7 acres of surface parking lots for their headqurters. People hope to hear more details about SW's plans by the end of September. In addition, City Club is planning a 23-story apartment to take out another one, tentative ground-breaking to be spring, 2021. Bit by bit, it's happening.
 

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Sherwin Williams announced a one-year delay, looking for a 2024 completion. Architect will be Pickard Chilton.

 
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