SkyscraperCity banner

1 - 20 of 1046 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Coimbatore corporation to decide on revamping city lake today

COIMBATORE: In an attempt to ease the flow of traffic on the Ukkadam to Aathupalam stretch, the city corporation is preparing to implement a proposal to strengthen the bunds of Ukkadam Periyakulam, allowing two wheelers to ply along the periphery of the water body.

The civic body is expected to discuss this proposal at the urgent meeting of the corporation council to be convened today. However, green activists have already raised objection to the proposal stating that it would have an adverse impact on the ecological balance of the water body and its surrounding wet lands.

As per the civic body's estimate, the work including the strengthening and beautification of the lake bund and the construction of a separate walkway and a two wheeler lane would cost Rs4.95cr. If the resolution is passed, the corporation is hoping to get the project funded through financial grant and subsidy from the state government.

The total length of the proposed vehicle lane would be 1.4km along the water body. Recently, state minister for municipal administration, rural development, law, courts and prisons, SP Velumani inspected the lake in the presence of senior officials from the district administration, corporation, highways and police department to discuss the feasibility of the project.

However, the decision to allow traffic along Ukkadam Periyakulam is being opposed by environmentalists. An official petition is expected to be submitted to the district administration and corporation, opposing the project. They said that the lake bunds were not strong enough to sustain the weight of the vehicles and would pose a serious risk to the public.

"It will have an adverse impact on the lake and its eco system. By allowing people and vehicles along the lake, the risk of pollution of the water body is higher. It is ironic that the government spends large amounts of money on rain water harvesting but is so callous about preserving a prominent water body," said K Moanraj, secretary, Save Coimbatore Wetlands, a consortium of environmental groups based in the city.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/coimbatore/Coimbatore-corporation-to-decide-on-revamping-city-lake-today/articleshow/37153827.cms
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Good start, but more needs to be done for Coimbatore waterbodies


In the last one year, hundreds of volunteers participated in initiatives to clean five waterbodies in Coimbatore — the Big Tank, Kurichi Tank, Kurichi canal, Valankulam and the Selva Chinthamani Tank.

While we dream of seeing the tanks and canals filled with water again, maintenance of the waterbodies and sustenance of the cleaning and desilting works is turning out to be a challenge, especially as flow of sewage into the tanks and dumping of debris continue.

Even five or six decades ago, tanks filled with water from the Noyyal, a thick tree cover full of birds, lush green fields, and birds that visit waterbodies were all part of Coimbatore, thanks to the Noyyal River System.

The system, which includes 21 anaicuts, 31 tanks, and 100 km of canals, from the origin of the Noyyal till the river joins the Cauvery at Noyyal village in Erode district, has been an enviable asset for the region.

However, some of the waterbodies in the region have shrunk in size and canals have been blocked with development activities during the last few years.

Now, the entire system needs to be revived if every water body has to be rejuvenated.

In a bid to rejuvenate these tanks, the young and old, students, businessmen, government employees and even top officials have involved themselves in removing tonnes of garbage and debris as part of the cleaning efforts during the last one year.

But three days ago, sand excavated during road work was dumped at the Kurichi canal that was cleaned in May.

This has blocked the flow of water to the Kurichi Tank and has brought to focus the need for an action plan to maintain the waterbodies.

Vanita Mohan, Managing Trustee of Siruthuli, says that with public coming together to clean the tanks, the government has also stepped in and this is a move in the right direction.

Maintenance of the waterbodies are likely to face challenges initially.

It will be a long-drawn process and requires continuous higher public awareness on the need to maintain the tanks.

According to Umesh Marudhachalam, who was involved in organising the cleaning of the Kurichi canal, non-governmental organisations and volunteers can create awareness on the need to conserve the water bodies. They can also take part in the cleaning activities.

However, the maintenance can be effective only if the government takes it up. The public will feel discouraged to participate in such initiatives if the tanks are not maintained.

According to him, inflow of sewage into the water bodies should be stopped and local leaders and the public in the nearby areas of the waterbodies should also be involved actively in the conservation programmes.

R. Raveendran, secretary of Residents’ Awareness Association of Coimbatore, adds that the cleaning activities had created awareness among the public and there could be public-private initiatives for cleaning of the tanks in summer. The main challenge is dumping of debris in the canals or on the tank bunds. The association had sought fencing of the water bodies.

Though the officials of the Corporation were not available for comment, one of them told The Hindu recently that the local body was pursuing the Rs.200-crore tanks rejuvenation project and had also sought funds under the National Lake Conservation Programme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Tanks: maintenance is the problem

During the last one year, hundreds of volunteers participated in initiatives to clean five water bodies in the city – Coimbatore Big Tank, Kurichi Tank, Kurichi canal, Valankulam and Selva Chinthamani Tank.

While we dream of seeing the tanks and canals filled with water again, maintenance of the water bodies and sustenance of the cleaning and desilting works is turning out to be a challenge, especially as flow of sewage into the tanks and dumping of debris continue.

Even five or six decades ago, tanks filled with water from the Noyyal, a thick tree cover full of birds, lush green fields, and birds that visit water bodies were all part of Coimbatore, thanks to the Noyyal River System. The System, which includes 21 anaicuts, 31 tanks, and 100 km of canals, from the origin of the Noyyal till the river joins the Cauvery at Noyyal village in Erode district, has been an enviable asset for the region. Some of the water bodies have shrunk in size and canals have been blocked with development activities during the last few years. Now, the entire system needs to be revived if every water body has to be rejuvenated.

In a bid to rejuvenate these tanks, the young and the aged, students, businessmen, government employees and even top officials have involved themselves in removing tonnes of garbage and debris as part of the cleaning efforts during the last one year.

But, a couple of days ago, sand excavated during road work was dumped at the Kurichi canal that was cleaned in May. This has blocked the flow of water to the Kurichi Tank and has brought to focus the need for an action plan to maintain the water bodies. Vanita Mohan, managing trustee of Siruthuli, says that with people coming together to clean the tanks, the government has also stepped in and this is a move in the right direction.

Maintenance of the water bodies are likely to face challenges initially. It will be a long-drawn process and requires continuous higher public awareness on the need to maintain the tanks.

According to Umesh Marudhachalam, who was involved in organising the cleaning of the Kurichi canal, non-Governmental organisations and volunteers can create awareness on the need to conserve the water bodies. They can also take part in the cleaning activities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,387 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
PWD move to take over custody of tanks from civic body

‘No work has taken place since the Corporation took over the tanks’





In three-and-a-half years since the Coimbatore Corporation took over from the Public Works Department (PWD) eight tanks in the city to rejuvenate these under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission, the PWD is making concerted efforts to get back the custody of the water bodies arguing that no work has taken place since the Corporation took over the tanks.

The PWD authorities in Coimbatore also appear to have told higher officials in Chennai that they wished to develop the Big Tank at Ukkadam into a tourism spot, perhaps even introduce a boating facility. The other tanks are: Valankulam, Narasampathy, Krishnampathy, Muthanankulam, Selvampathy, Selvachinthamani and the Singanallur Tank.

Sources in the PWD told The Hindu that the department was upset at the way the Corporation had allowed encroachments to thrive on the tanks. The civic body is accused of not preventing encroachments and even allowing unauthorised settlers in Valankulam to have facilities such as roads and retaining wall that will prevent inflow of water.

The PWD wants to take up the rejuvenation of the tanks with funding under the National Lake Conservation Programme. It is said that the existing condition of the tanks had been brought to the notice of the PWD Secretary and he, in turn, has asked the officials in Coimbatore to send a list of reasons as to why the PWD wants to take over the tanks again.

It is also said that the PWD has stepped up its efforts in the wake of S.M. Velusamy exiting as the Mayor. He was reportedly putting up a strong resistance to the PWD taking back the tanks. Along with Siruthuli, a citizen’s initiative to rejuvenate water resources, the Corporation wanted to turn tanks such as the Valankulam into a picnic spot. The tug-of-war began in 2005 when the Corporation sought custody of the tanks from the PWD. The custody was granted only in early 2010. The civic body even engaged Action for Food Production, a non-Governmental organisation, to study the condition of the tanks and suggest measures for rejuvenation. The tasks to be done were desilting, removal of encroachments, preventing the dumping of waste and discharge of sewage.

However, even Siruthuli has been lamenting the manner in which debris and other kinds of waste that are being dumped in the tanks.

Deputy Commissioner of the Corporation S. Sivarasu said the Corporation was pursuing the Rs.200-crore tanks rejuvenation project closely and that it had also sought funds under the NLCP, in addition to the JNNURM funds from the Central and State governments.

It is not as though the Corporation had not made any effort in taking the scheme forward or not focussed on the problems such as encroachment that impeded rejuvenation, he said.
 
1 - 20 of 1046 Posts
Top