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Light Rail project to kick off in December 2018




The construction of the Light Rail system to be introduced to Colombo City and its suburbs will commence at the end of 2018, Megapolis and Western Development Minister Champika Ranawaka revealed yesterday.

Ministry Secretary Nihal Rupasinghe, signed the agreement with South Korean company Sen Young Vice President Kim Nam Seol last morning. The company will carry out the feasibility study on the project, which will commence within seven days of signing the agreement.

Addressing a press briefing soon after signing the agreement, the Minister said that project would be carried out in seven phases. Accordingly, the first phase would see the Light Rail system running from Malabe to Fort.

“The feasibility study along with an environmental impact assessment report as well as a social impact assessment report would take around a year to complete. As the rail system will through Colombo City and its suburbs, many homes, business and establishments would be affected and compensation will be paid,” the Minister said, adding that the Light Rail system would be elevated above Colombo City and set on columns to traverse unhindered.

Phase 1 will begin from Fort Station and have stations near the Western Province Transport Centre, St. Joseph’s College, National Hospital, Borella, Cotta Road, Welikada, Rajagiriya, Sethsiripaya, Battaramulla, Palan Thuna, Robert Gunawardana Mawatha, Lumbini Temple, Talahena, Malabe, and the IT park; a total of 15.3 km with 16 stops along the route.

“The entire journey is estimated to take just 27 minutes whereas at present if you travel the same route by bus it would take close to two hours,” the Minister said.

The remaining six phases would see the Light Rail system extending further within Colombo and into the Colombo District as far as Kottawa, Kadawatha and Peliyagoda.

The proposed Light Rail system will be powered solely by electricity and will initially consist of four compartments, allowing a single train to carry up to 165 passengers at once.

“By 2035 we hope to add to more carriages to each train so that it reaches a total six compartments per train. It has been calculated that thereafter some 30,000 people can be transported within an hour by Light Rail,” Ranawaka said.

The Colombo Light Rail project is a Public-Private-Partnership and the first phase of the project will be funded by a low interest Japanese loan. The procurement process will be twofold; selection of international organisations for feasibility and project planning reports while tenders will also be called to select foreign investors for maintenance depot for the Light Rail system.

“By mid next year we will call for tenders for the remaining phases. We will carry out the work of the remaining six phases simultaneously so the pace of the project could be fast-tracked. All tenders called for this project have been carried out in a transparent manner,” Minister Ranawaka noted, adding that the entire project was slated to be completed by 2023 at a cost of $ 6 billion.

Once completed in 2023, the rail system would be further extended to reach the towns of Homagama, Horana and Mirigama, the Minister said. Ranawaka pointed out that traffic congestion in Colombo had become a tedious problem, causing an economic loss of Rs. 1 billion on a daily basis.

“Successive governments have failed to address the issue of traffic congestion and advance the public transport network. The Light Rail system will significantly help with this problem. It will be the largest public transport project carried out in the country, second only to the existing conventional railway system.”

http://www.ft.lk/business/Light-Rail-project-to-kick-off-in-December-2018/34-643868
 

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I notice they've cut back on the number of stops in the first phase. Initially, i remember reading that 21 stops were planned, but they've now cut that down to 16. They should seriously show us a proper map of where the stations are going to be, because I have a worrying feeling all this will be good for is long-distance travel, and that point to point travel will still happen with 3-wheelers.

Additionally, they should seriously take a look at integrating the bus system with this. We have a long, long history of putting systems in place with no cooperation or links with each other. There's going to be little point in investing so much if you have to get off at Borella, then walk for five minutes to get to a bus stop to take you somewhere else- all that'll achieve is the same old amount of 3-wheel usage. Even integrating the train system wouldn't be a bad idea.

To top it off- and this is what worries me the most- there's no talk of a fee structure yet. Some might say it's too early to talk about that, but my argument would be that it's a key part of the feasibility study (no, not the one the Korean company is doing- that's an engineering feasibility report, not a financial one from what I understand). You have to know if you're going to price this thing to turn a profit and for this to be a good investment. Too much, and hardly anyone will use it. Too little, and this will become another SLTB or CGR, a black hole of tax money defended by people with little understanding of economics shouting about how these "aren't supposed to turn a profit". Price unimaginatively, and you still lose customers. A good idea would be weekly, monthly or yearly passes for whoever uses the line enough. Another would be to establish pricing zones like the London Underground has.

An article on potential pitfalls: http://gulfnews.com/news/africa/ethiopia-s-light-rail-fails-to-fix-traffic-problems-1.1992390

Wikipedia article for the Colombo Light Rail: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colombo_Light_Rail (please help add to it, especially with the history and how it came to be, but remember to use proper sources)
 

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Exactly, the government won't recruit anyone who studied in private sector, until finding a so-called government employee, this will continue. :bash:
Thats all IESL thing .They dont give IESL to any institute which dont have their standerds .Even engineering faculties at South eastern and Jaffna dont have it .Only Moratuwa,Pera and Ruhana had completed according to them .All private unis havent complete their standerds.And IESL is responsible for Enginnering standards in Sri Lanka.So government cant recruit someone who dont have IESL:eek:hno:
 

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Thats all IESL thing .They dont give IESL to any institute which dont have their standerds .Even engineering faculties at South eastern and Jaffna dont have it .Only Moratuwa,Pera and Ruhana had completed according to them .All private unis havent complete their standerds.And IESL is responsible for Enginnering standards in Sri Lanka.So government cant recruit someone who dont have IESL:eek:hno:
IESL exams can be done privately!
 

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"The concept of the logo is based on the 'Coconut flower', which is a symbol of prosperity in Sri Lanka. Colombo city being a hub in South Asia, the fine lines represent its connectivity with the rest of the world. The lines also represent the routes of the LRT project within the city of Colombo. Moreover, one of the ancient names of Colombo in the Sinhalese language is 'Kola Amba Thota', which means the harbor with the leafy mango trees. The designer had combined all these elements which are very much significant to the city of Colombo to create the unique logo as this is the first time in the history of Public Transport in Sri Lanka, that a thorough branding was followed. The logo does not come close to the general LRT, MRT, Subway logos, because in terms of design, it follows an entirely different trend known as the 'Minimalism' in design world."

I personally think this is a great concept! :banana::banana::banana:
 

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"The concept of the logo is based on the 'Coconut flower', which is a symbol of prosperity in Sri Lanka. Colombo city being a hub in South Asia, the fine lines represent its connectivity with the rest of the world. The lines also represent the routes of the LRT project within the city of Colombo. Moreover, one of the ancient names of Colombo in the Sinhalese language is 'Kola Amba Thota', which means the harbor with the leafy mango trees. The designer had combined all these elements which are very much significant to the city of Colombo to create the unique logo as this is the first time in the history of Public Transport in Sri Lanka, that a thorough branding was followed. The logo does not come close to the general LRT, MRT, Subway logos, because in terms of design, it follows an entirely different trend known as the 'Minimalism' in design world."

I personally think this is a great concept! :banana::banana::banana:
Can I ask where the quote is from?
 
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