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I said love, I said pet
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Incredibly dense and packed in so tightly! Many shots look like some of the projects in NYC. Are these all social housing for the poor/working classes?
 

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Madrileñian member
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^^
Just a part of them are social housing.
The working class lives in these types of neighborhoods around Madrid, but it doesn't mind they're lower class, the prices of these houses are usually between US$ 200.000 and US$ 500.000 depending of the surface (45m2 - 115m2), housing is expensive in Madrid, and now it's cheaper than 2 or 3 years ago. The rents rang from US$ 600 to US$ 1.800 monthly.
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
^^ Of course, and those neighborhoods that were built without the suitable infrastructure at their time (60's or 70's), have succesfully developed it in last decades.
All of those districts are also very well connected with subway and highway networks (you can see both in this pic of the eastern part of Madrid, where most of those neighborhoods are located):

 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lol, I'm still surprised this thread only got replies from 4 people... in this specific subforum!!
I guess the reason is that it's not about an Eastern European city. :/

Anyway, I wanted to put new pics from Bing Maps, showing a better perspective (from far far away) of some of those neighborhoods up there.

Enjoy. :cheers:
























 

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Macedonia
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Lol, I'm still surprised this thread only got replies from 4 people... in this specific subforum!!
I guess the reason is that it's not about an Eastern European city. :/

Anyway, I wanted to put new pics from Bing Maps, showing a better perspective (from far far away) of some of those neighborhoods up there.

Enjoy. :cheers:
Don't mind about the replies, just keep up the good work. :cheers:
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Skopje/Скопје;101162807 said:
Don't mind about the replies, just keep up the good work. :cheers:
Thank you ;)

My God! An ocean of commieblocks! I think Madrid can easily compete against Moscow or Kiev!!!
Uh, caution, those are the traditional top commieblock cities. :lol:


I think Moscow's and Kiev's commies may be larger and with more impressive layouts, but some of these Madrid housing developments are far denser, which makes life somewhat easier for their inhabitants.
You can access more highways, subway lines, and consequently infrastructures and services in much less space and time.
Also, streets are more lively due to having those neighborhoods so close to each other (the large amount of businessess in the ground floors of the blocks helps a lot), instead of wasting acres of terrain to have empty spaces between them like it happens in other countries.
I've never been to Eastern Europe yet, but a friend of me (who is also and enthusiast of residential blocks) is now working in Voronezh and telling me interesting differences between those neighborhoods in Russia and in Spain.


Also, the layout of these neighborhoods is why many people say that Madrid, a metro area with +6.000.000 people, looks tiny on maps when compared to the rest of European big cities (specifically Western ones), which tend to sprawl in kilometers.

Anyway, Madrid is not dense at all... there are far denser block-cities is Spain, with dozens of tall buildings wall-to-wall on grid plans :nuts:
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
^^ Yes, that neighborhood is located near Barajas... but the nearest runway is 2 kilometers away from those buildings. I'd say that they are enough far way from it, but I don't really know anything about this issue :?

The blocks in that picture are this area marked in red:

 

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Redsigert User
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Thank you ;)
I think Moscow's and Kiev's commies may be larger and with more impressive layouts, but some of these Madrid housing developments are far denser, which makes life somewhat easier for their inhabitants.
You can access more highways, subway lines, and consequently infrastructures and services in much less space and time.
Also, streets are more lively due to having those neighborhoods so close to each other (the large amount of businessess in the ground floors of the blocks helps a lot), instead of wasting acres of terrain to have empty spaces between them like it happens in other countries.
I've never been to Eastern Europe yet, but a friend of me (who is also and enthusiast of residential blocks) is now working in Voronezh and visiting many Russian cities. He is always telling me interesting differences between those neighborhoods in Russia and in Spain.
I noticed that even modernist planning was much denser in the south be it Italy or Spain, not to mention Greece where most of Athens seem to be modernist in architecture but planning is almost 100% traditional.
I don't think transportation is such a big issue as long as the city is relatively small here in Poland people seem to like big spaces between the buildings because it gives more privacy and sunlight, if neigbors see your everyday life through the window it's considered rather perversive but I guess you can get used to it.
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I don't think transportation is such a big issue as long as the city is relatively small here in Poland people seem to like big spaces between the buildings because it gives more privacy and sunlight, if neigbors see your everyday life through the window it's considered rather perversive but I guess you can get used to it.
Actually, most modern commieblock districts in Spain are being built with huge green spaces and boulevards between buildings...
something more similar to those in Eastern Europe.
I think that you can find both opinions on people in this country. Some people find that kind of neighborhoods more livable and relaxing,
but others prefer denser areas with a more urban feeling.

I noticed that even modernist planning was much denser in the south be it Italy or Spain, not to mention Greece where most of Athens seem to be modernist in architecture but planning is almost 100% traditional.
You're right about modernist planning, it's quite dense.

...But I'd say the densest areas of Spain are found in cities that suffered a massive growth during the 60's.
They developed districts with a poor planification, clearly a result of unscrupulous urban speculation.
There are neighborhoods of this kind through all the country (almost in every +100.000 inhabitants city), but I'd say these two cities are among the best examples.
Believe me, it's not funny to drive through them :lol:

Zaragoza:






Gijón:



 

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The last disciple
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^^ It is really seldom to have a such dense development of commieblocks in eastern europe. These aspects of space and to have something one would describe it as privacy is a unique characteristic to eastern europe commieblocks and puts them among all the others commies in the world. The planning of such districts was in terms of quality one of the highest in the ages of communism. It was like utopia to housing projects and we are now able to honour these plannings. It will not happen soon that we can witness such projects once again.
 

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Redsigert User
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^^Commieblocks in places like Spain were probably private investments so developers wanted to squish as much as possible from their plots, that might be part of the reason why it's different although today they look fine. It seems they invested heavily in improving the surroundings rather than commies themselves it makes sense I guess in the southern climate where reducing heating costs is not that much of an issue :dunno:
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
^^ There are a mix of both; many of those projects were built by the francoist state as social housing, but in the 60's and 70's started the boom of private investments. Also, I think that in the first steps, they wanted to 'emulate' the classic density of Spanish city centers. It would be strange to have built sparse projects in cities where most of people already lived in high building concentrations. Of course there was speculation and poor planification, but I'm sure they built that way because they knew that the average Spaniard wouldn't mind about it.
And about heating systems, they are indeed neccesary in most of the country! In almost every Spanish inland city we have continental climate, with temperatures below 0º every winter (like these days in my own city). :)
 

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Redsigert User
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And about heating systems, they are indeed neccesary in most of the country! In almost every Spanish inland city we have continental climate, with temperatures below 0º every winter (like these days in my own city)
But commieblocks seem to be pretty much left in their original condition, some were painted perhaps but doesn't seem like there was any large scale thermomodernization.
 

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Aux armes, citoyens!
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mmmm... I don't know a lot about that issue, but I have the perception that it depends on the decision made by the neighbor council of each block. Some have connected the building to the natural gas network, but for example, my building still have the original diesel central heating system.
 
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