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1 bedroom 905,000 :lol::lol: - you get something much better in Brisbane for that price, spend the saved cash on flying to Sydney for the weekend, although not much seems to be going on with lockouts etc these days.
 

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Australia’s recycling lie exposed: Plastics being dumped, buried and burned in Malaysia

https://www.9news.com.au/national/6...ia-china/e1a06745-9b35-4b15-85cb-32168ef9b440

A 60 Minutes investigation has revealed that Australia’s attempts to ethically recycle are falling short, causing harm offshore for our international “dumping ground.”

Australia has earned the unfortunate title of one of the world’s most wasteful nations, and as our waste crisis worsened the importance of recycling was drilled into the nation.

We were encouraged to reduce, reuse, recycle, in a desperate bid to clean up the country.

But as 60 Minutes reporter Liam Bartlett revealed, the reality is that much of the public’s efforts to recycle the huge amounts of plastic we consume are often a waste of time.

60 Minutes has tracked mixed plastic waste - the material assumed easiest to salvage and re-use - from the recycling bins of Australian suburbs to dozens of illegal processing sites in Malaysia, where our discarded plastics often end up being dumped, buried or even burned.

It’s turned Malaysia into Australia’s dumping ground, with dire consequences including contamination of drinking water and air pollution.

Despite so many Australians diligently separating plastics from their general waste and placing it in their recycling bins, very little reprocessing of mixed plastic is happening on home soil - with the exception of milk bottles and soft drink bottles which have a discrete market.

Haydn Breheny, who runs a recycling business for industry waste in south-east Melbourne, revealed to 60 Minutes that when plastic arrives at his warehouse, if it can’t be sold to Asian markets then it can’t actually be recycled here in Australia and just ends up in the tip.

“Morally, you want to do something for it,” he told Bartlett.

“But if I can't get rid of it, what am I meant to do? Eat it myself?”

For the last two decades, Australia’s recycling industry has been dependent on China – which had been taking a staggering 125,000 tonnes of our plastic waste every year, sorting it by hand with low labour costs and melting it down into new plastic products to be sold back to us and the rest of the world.

But in January 2018 China effectively closed its doors, citing environmental concerns.

The decision threw the world’s recycling industry into a tailspin as nations, including Australia, scoured the globe for new buyers.

They found them in Southeast Asia, Malaysia in particular, where hundreds of Chinese operators quickly relocated to set up factories, often illegally. These dodgy businessmen then proceeded to buy as much foreign trash as they could get their hands on.

Almost overnight Malaysia overtook China as the world’s largest importer of plastic rubbish. Australia alone has dumped more than 71,000 tonnes of it in just 12 months and it’s helping fuel a criminal underworld in plastic recycling, harming the environment and the people of Malaysia.

Malaysia’s Environment Minister Yeo Bee Yin has shut down no less than 150 illegal factories since July last year, but admits her country doesn’t have the resources to properly police the unlawful trade in plastic waste.

“I want to send [plastic waste] all back to the counties of origin,” the Minister said.

“And have to really ask you to solve your own problem.”

Because of this, Malaysia has imposed harsher restrictions on imports and new permits.

The Minister warned 60 Minutes it’s only the beginning – Malaysia’s doors will soon close on Australian rubbish for good.

“I do not blame ordinary Australians,” she told Bartlett.

“I think most of the people do not know this is happening. But, now we know that this is happening, we need the solution.”
 

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At about the junction of Kensington and O'Connor Streets a sizeable subterranean water storage tank constructed in brick in the 1820s to service the horses involved with the brewery was discovered during work and is now marked by a low brick wall that follows it's contours above ground.
There is notice board explaining matters above it.
 

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https://www.9news.com.au/national/6...ia-china/e1a06745-9b35-4b15-85cb-32168ef9b440

A 60 Minutes investigation has revealed that Australia’s attempts to ethically recycle are falling short, causing harm offshore for our international “dumping ground.”

Australia has earned the unfortunate title of one of the world’s most wasteful nations, and as our waste crisis worsened the importance of recycling was drilled into the nation.

We were encouraged to reduce, reuse, recycle, in a desperate bid to clean up the country.

But as 60 Minutes reporter Liam Bartlett revealed, the reality is that much of the public’s efforts to recycle the huge amounts of plastic we consume are often a waste of time.

60 Minutes has tracked mixed plastic waste - the material assumed easiest to salvage and re-use - from the recycling bins of Australian suburbs to dozens of illegal processing sites in Malaysia, where our discarded plastics often end up being dumped, buried or even burned.

It’s turned Malaysia into Australia’s dumping ground, with dire consequences including contamination of drinking water and air pollution.

Despite so many Australians diligently separating plastics from their general waste and placing it in their recycling bins, very little reprocessing of mixed plastic is happening on home soil - with the exception of milk bottles and soft drink bottles which have a discrete market.

Haydn Breheny, who runs a recycling business for industry waste in south-east Melbourne, revealed to 60 Minutes that when plastic arrives at his warehouse, if it can’t be sold to Asian markets then it can’t actually be recycled here in Australia and just ends up in the tip.

“Morally, you want to do something for it,” he told Bartlett.

“But if I can't get rid of it, what am I meant to do? Eat it myself?”

For the last two decades, Australia’s recycling industry has been dependent on China – which had been taking a staggering 125,000 tonnes of our plastic waste every year, sorting it by hand with low labour costs and melting it down into new plastic products to be sold back to us and the rest of the world.

But in January 2018 China effectively closed its doors, citing environmental concerns.

The decision threw the world’s recycling industry into a tailspin as nations, including Australia, scoured the globe for new buyers.

They found them in Southeast Asia, Malaysia in particular, where hundreds of Chinese operators quickly relocated to set up factories, often illegally. These dodgy businessmen then proceeded to buy as much foreign trash as they could get their hands on.

Almost overnight Malaysia overtook China as the world’s largest importer of plastic rubbish. Australia alone has dumped more than 71,000 tonnes of it in just 12 months and it’s helping fuel a criminal underworld in plastic recycling, harming the environment and the people of Malaysia.

Malaysia’s Environment Minister Yeo Bee Yin has shut down no less than 150 illegal factories since July last year, but admits her country doesn’t have the resources to properly police the unlawful trade in plastic waste.

“I want to send [plastic waste] all back to the counties of origin,” the Minister said.

“And have to really ask you to solve your own problem.”

Because of this, Malaysia has imposed harsher restrictions on imports and new permits.

The Minister warned 60 Minutes it’s only the beginning – Malaysia’s doors will soon close on Australian rubbish for good.

“I do not blame ordinary Australians,” she told Bartlett.

“I think most of the people do not know this is happening. But, now we know that this is happening, we need the solution.”
Tim, you may well get told off by some for posting this article in the wrong place or that it might have no place here at all, but I for one do thank you for posting this, whether this forum is about Sydney buildings or green politics or cat videos. We need all the reminders we can get to clean up our shocking environmental mess! Urgently!! So, thank you!
 

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In some ways, this is probably the single most interesting aspect of the whole Central Park redevelopment project (although Spice Alley is cool).

For anyone interested in more info.

The detailed current SSD proposal for the Brewery Yard by Tzannes (links as a download) -
https://majorprojects.planningporta...nt?AttachRef=SSD-9374!20190813T042301.092 GMT

The original Urbis Conservation Plan from 2009 (links as a download) -
https://majorprojects.planningporta...chRef=MP08_0253-MOD-1!20190805T033537.318 GMT

Some of the elements described have already been modified or removed as part of the stage 1 rework project back in 2014 when the tri-generation plant was installed.

I don't know why they feel the need to enclose the external fire escape stairs though. To me, it adds nothing... but perhaps it's required by code?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4,478 ·
bout time
https://www.commercialrealestate.co...oq69oOspQOspqTXCMOoq9zCOfvkkj701rMvtLT08ZFVj0



Last piece of Sydney’s Central Park puzzle sells to Melbourne investor
australian-financial-review

A heritage brewery yard in Sydney’s Chippendale, the last piece of the puzzle to the Central Park development and a symbol of the suburb’s working-class roots, has been bought by Melbourne-based IP Generation for $16.5 million.

The heritage property, which was sold by Frasers and Sekisui House, is the first Sydney asset for the investment vehicle, through one of its five syndicated trusts, which is run by former Impact Investment Group chief executive officer Chris Lock.

Property records show the discreet sale of 5 Central Park Avenue recently settled.

Since the Kent Brewery closed in 2003, the building, on about 2400 square metres of freehold land, has been vacant while Central Park, a large residential and retail development, was built around it.

IP Generation has submitted plans for a $44 million refurbishment and if approved, it will get the green light to convert the heritage building into 6000sq m of net lettable office space with 30 basement car parks.

Award-winning architect Tzannes, the firm that designed the precinct’s masterplan, has been retained to see through the final phase of the refurbishment.

“It was hard to pass up the opportunity really, given it is such an iconic project. It feels like it could be an asset that’s publicly-owned given its heritage and its prime location in Chippendale,” IP Generation’s Chris Lock said.

The building fits the bill for the opportunistic investor looking to add significant value to commercial property.

The property’s completion value is expected to be about $120 million, or $20,000 a square metre.

“We consider our strategy more akin to a private equity investor with each asset we acquire having its own unique strategy and capital structure,” Mr Lock said.

He said the project also fitted in with the type of tenants they would be trying to attract in the next few months – emerging, high-growth businesses particularly in the tech or creative industries.

In another deal recently, IP Generation bought a shopping centre, Corio Central, in Victoria from Vicinity Centres at a 3.8 per cent discount to book value.

Late last year, in a joint venture with Melbourne-based investment firm Wingate, it also acquired an A-grade Adelaide office tower at 77 Grenfell Street for $103.5 million.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4,480 ·
great news, finally. taken ages to gain approva;. my fav part of central park with industrial bldg and chimney stack.hopefully work will commence and get it complete
 
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