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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
LCQ13: Studies on electronic road pricing scheme
Wednesday, May 24, 2006
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Dr Hon Raymond Ho and a written reply by the Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works, Dr Sarah Liao, at the Legislative Council meeting today (May 24) :

Question:

It has been reported that the Government is actively conducting studies on the electronic road pricing (ERP) scheme, with a view to resolving the traffic congestion problem in Central District, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay areas. In this connection, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) as I learnt that studies on the above scheme started a few years ago and the scheme was subsequently abandoned due to the lack of adequate alternative roads, why the authorities are actively studying the scheme now;

(b) as the authorities have already formulated plans (such as the provision of Central-Wan Chai Bypass) to improve the traffic congestion problem in Central District, etc, whether they have assessed if there is any need for the ERP scheme; if so, of the assessment results; and

(c) whether it has assessed if the ERP scheme, while achieving relief in the scheme areas, will lead to an increase in the traffic flows in other areas, thereby causing the traffic conditions in those areas to deteriorate?

Reply:

Madam President,

We have been exploring all possible measures, including electronic road pricing (ERP), to improve the traffic flow along major transport corridors, cater for traffic growth and alleviate traffic congestion. Regarding the study on ERP, we are updating the transport model developed some years ago with latest data to assess the impact of different charging scenarios on relieving traffic congestion.

When examining the ERP scheme, we will consider the effectiveness of the scheme and other traffic improvement measures, as well as the pros and cons of implementing the scheme and otherwise. We will consult the public before making any decision.

We will also assess how implementing ERP in specific areas will affect the traffic situation in other areas.
 

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well Singapore and London are doing it and they're pretty successful... i think the most important thing is that this will only impact the richest and some upper-middle class who owns cars... the concern is that the richest wouldn't mind paying coz they got the dough n e ways, but it's the middle class that suffers coz it's a burden to them...

but with such a sophisticated and efficient mass transit there's really no reason for ppl to drive... in my opinion, with bus AND subway AND lightbus AND tram, there's really no place in downtown HK thaz unreachable by taking mass transit... as long as they figure out something for commercial vehicles like light trucks or what not, I think it's doable.

Also I think this will force the bus companies to finally sit down together and review their bus routes... right now in a lotta places there're just way too many buses from different companies running similar routes and what not, and they're clogging up the streets even more... with the ERP maybe they'll finally sit down to consider the larger picture in order to lower costs...
 

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I think HK isn't that suitable for the Congestion Charge to against driving. It is because HK doesn't have enough alternative roads to the downtown center as Singapore and London do. It is better for HK to limit the growth of the vehicles and build more railways as many Japanese cities do. :|
 

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Rachmaninov said:
HK isn't having really serious congestion so I don't see why they really should charge us.
i agree with that n these charges r quite unpopular in london n singapore for the locals anyway
 

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spicytimothy said:
well Singapore and London are doing it and they're pretty successful... i think the most important thing is that this will only impact the richest and some upper-middle class who owns cars... the concern is that the richest wouldn't mind paying coz they got the dough n e ways, but it's the middle class that suffers coz it's a burden to them...

but with such a sophisticated and efficient mass transit there's really no reason for ppl to drive... in my opinion, with bus AND subway AND lightbus AND tram, there's really no place in downtown HK thaz unreachable by taking mass transit... as long as they figure out something for commercial vehicles like light trucks or what not, I think it's doable.

Also I think this will force the bus companies to finally sit down together and review their bus routes... right now in a lotta places there're just way too many buses from different companies running similar routes and what not, and they're clogging up the streets even more... with the ERP maybe they'll finally sit down to consider the larger picture in order to lower costs...
Also not to mention that the fares are cheap too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
LCQ19: Congestion Charging Transport Model - Feasibility Study
Wednesday, November 8, 2006
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Dr Hon Kwok Ka-ki and a written reply by the Secretary for Health, Welfare and Food, Dr York Chow (in the absence of the Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works), at the Legislative Council meeting today (November 8):

Question:

Regarding the consultancy study on the Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) scheme commissioned by the Government to update the transport model developed earlier, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) whether it will make public the brief to the consultant concerned so that the public may scrutinise whether the study conforms to the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance or the guidelines in Technical Circular No. 1/04 of August 19, 2004 issued by the Housing, Planning and Lands Bureau and the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau;

(b) of the details of any instructions relating to the proposed construction of the Central-Wan Chai Bypass (CWB) in the brief;

(c) whether it has instructed the consultant to present ERP models that are capable of reducing the existing volume of traffic in the Central to Causeway Bay corridor without the need for constructing CWB;

(d) whether it has given the consultant any instructions relating to toll free usage of the roads concerned when there is through traffic;

(e) whether it has given the consultant any instructions relating to the income generated by the ERP scheme;

(f) whether it has instructed the consultant to conduct public consultation (as required by the Technical Circular) on the use of the revenue generated by the ERP scheme for improving public transportation, reducing pollution from public transportation and reducing other vehicle-based taxes; if it has, of the details of the public consultation; if it has not, of the reasons for that; and

(g) whether it has instructed the consultant to compare the costs of the construction of the proposed CWB with those of the development of an ERP scheme which does not impose a toll when there is through traffic?

Reply :

Madam President,

The purpose of the Congestion Charging Transport Model - Feasibility Study commissioned by the Transport Department is to collect transport data for the development of a Congestion Charging Transport Model to replace the outdated model developed in the previous Electronic Road Pricing Feasibility Study, and to apply the new Model to assess the impacts of different congestion charging scenarios in relieving traffic congestion.

Under the Study, the consultant is required to study all relevant aspects of congestion charging, such as the charging areas, charging methods, the need for and availability of any alternative routes, impacts of charging on the traffic conditions of the nearby road networks etc. We have not given any specific instructions relating to the proposed construction of the Central-Wan Chai Bypass or the toll-free usage of concerned roads when there is through traffic. The consultant is free to examine any congestion charging scenarios.

The consultant is also required to carry out a broad assessment of the financial and economic aspects of the potential congestion charging scenarios. As the Study focuses on the development of a Congestion Charging Transport Model, we have not asked the consultant to compare the cost of developing a congestion charging scenario with that of any road projects.

The Technical Circular No. 1/04 sets out the requirements of the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance and provides guidance for public officers and public bodies to follow in considering and approving reclamation proposals. As the aforesaid Study aims to develop a transport model to facilitate the assessment of the impacts of different congestion charging scenarios, it does not come under the purview of the Circular. Nevertheless, we have deposited a copy of the Study brief at the Legislative Council Secretariat for Members' reference.

The revenue generated by a congestion charging scheme will form part of the General Revenue of the Administration, and its use will be considered in the overall context of the Administration's resource allocation where views from the public will be taken into account. We recognize that community consensus would be crucial for such a charging scheme. We will consult the public before any decision is made.
 

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Sounds like another project for Wilbur Smith Ass., the consultant did the last ERP study.

Hopefully, it is going to be the last model we need before we actually implement the ERP system in HK. I think it is like the forth model we have in the last 20 yrs or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bypass could halve levy for drive to Central
Huge fee if road pricing starts now

30 March 2008
South China Morning Post

If the government introduced a congestion charge tomorrow it would have to sting drivers for HK$90 for each trip to Central - and that would deter only one in five from making the journey by road.

But drivers would need pay only HK$40 to HK$50 if the scheme were launched in 2016, when the Central-Wan Chai bypass has been built.

Those are among the findings of the second study of the feasibility of electronic road pricing.

A senior government source called the HK$90 charge huge and said: "We do not think people will be willing to pay such a high price."

Congestion charging has been on the agenda since the 1980s. A consultancy study finished in 2000 was not released in full. The source said officials were looking at the second study's findings and considering how and when to release them.

The source said the difference between the charges was so high because, without a bypass, drivers unwilling to pay would have almost no alternative route.

"They would have to pay and go to Central because there was no other choice, thus only a huge charge can deter traffic coming to Central. With the bypass, drivers going to Sheung Wan and Western could skip Central without paying a charge. Without the bypass, motorists who don't want to pay would be pushed to Mid-Levels and that would be a nightmare."

The source added: "The bypass is an essential part of the road pricing scheme."

Tim Hau Doe-kwong, a University of Hong Kong transport expert, said the figures showed the significance of giving drivers a second option.

"A mere increase in costs to suppress demand without the provision of an alternative would result in public chaos," he said.

The Transport Department's 2006 annual traffic census shows the average number of vehicles entering and leaving the city's central business district each day was 491,320.

Other cities have reported dramatic results from congestion charging. Singapore's Land Transport Authority says the number of vehicles entering the city centre fell by more than 70 per cent when road pricing was introduced in 1997. Transport for London, which oversees congestion charging in the British capital, says that in 2006, the number of vehicles entering the central zone where the charge applies was down 21 per cent on the number in 2002, a year before it began charging drivers.

The Hong Kong government's third comprehensive transport study, in 2003, showed average speeds had dropped to 16km/h on major roads in the central business district. If nothing was done by 2011, it said, that would drop to 5.3km/h.

The Council for Sustainable Development polled 80,000 people last year and found more than 40 per cent support for electronic road pricing.
 

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Can't say enough we should have/need WCB built before the ERP implemented.

10-15 years ago, it said WCB would have been done by 2006 and ERP can have the green light by 2009. It's 2008 now, where are we? sigh......

But how the heck you managed to find this article back from March??
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh I have my sources ... plenty of newswires and good search functions to dig up old dirt. :)

I'm doing a regular selective review of older threads to see if I can post some recent updates. Can't leave some of these old threads hanging along the sidelines ...
 

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Hong Kong already has a de facto Congestion Charge. All the tunnels and bridges have tolls which can become quite outrageous if you commute daily through them.
 

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It is pretty clear that HK will have a London style congestion charge as soon as the 6 lane urban freeway along the water front from Central to CWB is complete. Some press reports elude to this.

The tunnels DO NOT act as a true congestion charge as they are not variable. Even London drops the charge at the weekends.

Hong Kong does need to manage its congestion rather than build more and more roads. A zone charge could easily be adopted for the very south of TST.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
14 streets in central Hong Kong to be covered by pilot electronic road pricing scheme, government paper says – but then document withdrawn for ‘technical reasons’
Transport bureau paper submitted to district council reveals for first time details of scheme, which government started studying in the 1980s
Proposal was supposed to be discussed at council meeting but item was removed from agenda and paper retracted
Mar 28, 2019
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Fourteen streets in the heart of Hong Kong will be covered by a pilot electronic road pricing scheme as officials aim to reduce traffic in the area by 15 per cent, according to a government paper.

The Transport and Housing Bureau paper submitted to Central and Western District Council revealed for the first time the details of the scheme, which the government first started studying in the 1980s and re-examined in 2017.

The proposal was supposed to be discussed at the council’s meeting on Thursday. But the item was removed from the agenda and the paper retracted at the last minute, with the discussion expected to be rescheduled to May.

A government source said the retraction was down to a “technical reason”.

According to the document, first made public on Tuesday, the government plans to implement a charging zone in Central, which will cover 14 streets from the waterfront to Hollywood Road. Motorists will be charged a fee for entering the area, which includes Queen’s Road Central, Des Voeux Road Central and Connaught Road Central.

More : https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong...central-hong-kong-be-covered-pilot-electronic
 
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