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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
China has begun building the biggest dam on the Yellow River, the country's second longest waterway.

It has been called the cradle of Chinese civilisation.

The Yellow River sprawls nearly 5,500 kilometres through northern China.

Work has now begun on the biggest dam on the river in the remote north-western province of Qinghai.

When completed in 2010, the hydro-electric dam will stand 250 metres high.

It will generate more than 10 billion kilowatt hours of electricity every year.

The environmental implications are unclear.

Already, the lower reaches of the river regularly dry up due to population pressures.

It is also heavily polluted from industries in nearby cities.

Does anyone have any other information on this dam or pics? Information came from Australia's ABC
 

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Is this and the Three Gorges differen't projects or are they the same?

From what I remember the 3 gorges stands at 180 meters tall and this one is at 250 meters??

But it simply can't be as large as the 3 gorges if construction can be completed in 4 years?
 

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Happy now...
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This dam is located in Qinghai on the Yellow River whereas the 3 gorges is in Hubei on the Yangtze River so they are different dams. Not sure if the Yellow and the Yangtze are one and the same rivers.
 

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Different rivers. As different as the Mississippi and Hudson, or the Volga and Lena. ;)
 

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Chang Jiang(Long River), aka Yangtze River, is the longest river in Asia and the 3rd longest in the world.

Huang He(Yellow River) is the 2nd longest river of China and the 6th longest in the world. It is one of the symbols of Chinese civilisation, despite some latest archeological evidence suggest that the culture along Yangtze is older and not inferior to that along Yellow River.
 

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whats the cost?
 

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Rachmaninov said:
"The environmental implications are unclear"

:dunno:
Unclear????? I think the environmental implicatios are unclear. I saw a recent video who explained the building of the dam. It will make that millions of people have to leave their whole cities to move another one. The have to build new cities to these people. Ancient archeologycs items will be flood. The lands scape will change forever, canyons, gorges, plains... all will be sucked down by the water.

The advantage of all this damage is that the dam will avoid the overflow that kills lots of people every year and that will generate hydroelectric energy.

That's all what I know, if somebody knows something else we'll be glad to read it. :) :)
 

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Read that

Damn the Chinese government for damming the Yangtze

By JASON KLEIN
Jason Klein, of Oradell, N.J., is a sophomore at Brown University.


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"Eight hundred sites of archeological importance will be lost, and two million people living in the watershed, half of whom are farmers, will be displaced"

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The federal government, in an effort to augment clean, efficient sources of power and derail the possibility of tragic floods inundating the lower Mississippi plains, decides to initiate construction of the Mississippi Dam. The reservoir formed by this dam will sink everything and everyone between New Orleans and St. Louis. Despite criticism, the government initiates this project of unforeseeable ecological, social, agricultural and economic impact.

The fictitious scenario above may seem outrageous, but it is significantly based on fact. Currently, the Chinese government is constructing the largest-scale dam project ever on the world's third-longest river, the Yangtze. Called the Three Gorges Dam, its purpose is threefold, according to the Chinese government: to control floods that perennially ravage people on its banks; to produce clean and efficient hydroelectricity; and to allow ocean-going vessels to penetrate as much as 1,500 miles into the heart of China.

Experts have clearly demonstrated major flaws with the government's plan. The river's high silt content, plus millions of tons of raw sewage pumped into the river annually, could create a 400-mile-long cesspool behind the dam, which would nullify government goals for hydroelectric production and inland penetration of sea-faring vessels. Countless indigenous species will become extinct and China's equivalent of the Grand Canyon will be submerged eternally. Eight hundred sites of archeological importance will be lost, and two million people living in the watershed, half of whom are farmers, will be displaced.

Despite these consequences, China's government refuses to halt the project. In fact, the dam is being pursued with intense vigor as it becomes more of a political statement of China's emergence as a world power rather than a means of social, agricultural and economic improvement. What the Chinese government fails to see is that this project may lead to the downfall of what has been a steady climb toward global acceptance. If the dam collapses (China's dam failure rate is six times the global dam failure rate), washed away will be the heart of China's agriculture - half of China's rice production and 70 percent of its commercial fishing - along with any acceptance China has gained in the world community thus far.

Keep in mind, too, that China holds more than one-fifth of the world's population. The substantial loss of agricultural production and increased unemployment caused by the dam are certain to compromise China's programs to alleviate hunger. Not only will the Chinese government be facilitating the irreversible destruction of the environment, it will also be facilitating the demise of its own citizens. And because these citizens constitute such a significant portion of the global community, the impact of the dam will be felt internationally. Grain production will decrease. Grain prices will increase. How will the world adjust to such sweeping economic and agricultural change?

The answer is it won't. China could control flooding and produce electricity along the Yangtze by constructing a series of smaller dams that would involve markedly less risk. But the monstrosity has become more than a dam. It is a political monument to the Chinese government itself.

The point of no return is fast approaching. If the Three Gorges Dam project is not contained by a global consortium of informed opponents, the future of China may likely take a turn for the worse. The global community knows there will be significant adverse ramifications. If we don't take action now, in a sense we are all equally responsible for the dam's consequences.

When the dam is finished it will change the rotation of the Earth because of the weigh.

Another link: http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1999/china.50/asian.superpower/three.gorges/
 
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