SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
The City
Joined
·
5,935 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This article suggests a slow trickle of population out of Cook County, and it also suggests that Chicago's population has declined from 2000 to 2004.

That being said, I have a few questions (if this is true). Even if Chicago's population stabilizes or slowly shrinks, isn't the city still doing great? After all, is the city better off with blue collar families or with millionaire singles and couples? That's the question that we must truly ask. Apparently, Chicago is transitioning from a city of producers to a city of consumers. I think we're better off as a city full of consumers because consumers want to be ENTERTAINED!! :) And after all, consumers spend a lot more cash than producers do.

Not only that, but isn't it better that families are leaving the city because it's too expensive, rather than because it's too dirty, crime-ridden, and run-down? Hmmm, it's gotta make you wonder...

Anyway, Chicago's current boom confuses me. Is the city doing well or is this just a facade? Perhaps only history will tell. After all, even the current transit crisis tells us more about our society's values than about the health of the city, don't you think?

Either way, here's the article (Tribune):

Cook losing people, collar counties gaining

By John McCormick
Tribune staff reporter
Published April 15, 2005


Cook County lost more people between 2000 and 2004 than any county in the nation, according to estimates released Thursday by the Census Bureau.

The new figures--based on administrative records and estimates for births, deaths and net migration--show the county lost nearly 49,000 people, or 0.9 percent, since the last official count in April 2000.

The largest-loser designation can partly be attributed to its massive size because raw numbers were used for the rankings. Still, among the nation's 10 largest counties, Cook County, with 5.3 million residents, was the only to record a population loss during the four-year period.

The suggestion that Cook County may be losing population runs against the perception of growth fueled by the large number of condominium projects that have sprouted across Chicago's skyline in recent years. But demographers say those buildings are often being inhabited by singles, couples and empty-nesters that are smaller in size than the families that are moving out.

As the area's central county recorded a loss, the news was more positive for the collar counties, where demographers say many of those who move from Cook County end up. The growth was especially strong in the metropolitan area's southwest section, where sprawl is booming.

Kendall County showed the nation's second-fastest percentage growth from 2003 to 2004, adding an estimated 8.3 percent, or about 5,500 people, in a single year. Since 2000, the estimates suggest the county has grown by 33 percent, adding 18,000 people and bringing the population to 72,548.

Will County, meanwhile, grew 4.8 percent from 2003 to 2004, adding more than 28,000 people and bringing the population to 613,849. That was a large enough jump to rank it among the top 10 counties nationally for numeric gain. It was the only county outside the nation's rapidly growing South and West to make that list.

The loss of Cook County population comes after it recorded a 5.3 percent population increase between 1990 and 2000, a period when the city of Chicago grew by 4 percent.

Kenneth Johnson, a demographer at Loyola University Chicago, said that during the four-year period the county recorded an influx of 188,000 immigrants, but also suffered a net loss of nearly 399,000 residents to other U.S. counties, resulting in an overall net loss of 211,000 people to migration.

Another factor used to build the population estimates, births versus deaths, showed a positive growth trend of more births than deaths. But the migration losses were enough to result in an overall loss of nearly 49,000 people.

"I think most of the loss is coming from the city," Johnson said, pointing to other census releases in the last couple years that have suggested declines for Chicago. "Whatever is going on, it may be accelerating a little bit."

A report Johnson published earlier this year using other census data showed suburban Cook's population remained essentially flat between 2000 and 2003.

Still, other demographers urged caution when examining the county numbers.

Marc Thomas, information services manager for the Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission, said some estimates in the 1990s showed the city losing population, a trend that proved false once the 2000 census was released.

"There are new housing units downtown," Thomas said. "But we really don't know what is going on in the other neighborhoods."

One thing that is clear, Thomas said, is the continued importance of immigrants in maintaining Cook County's population. "Cook County is relying on foreign immigration to prop it up," he said.

While DuPage and Lake Counties were once top destinations for people leaving Cook County, Thomas said Kendall and Will Counties now appear to be favored by those seeking affordable housing in the suburbs. "By and large, it is driven by people wanting newer and bigger as cheaply as possible," he said.

Thomas said Cook County also has a large number of Baby Boomers nearing retirement age. "The question will be where they go after retirement," he said.

Chicago officials said they had not examined the census data, but they discounted the notion that the city is losing population.

"The city is vibrant and is still attractive to people and is attracting people," said Connie Buscemi, spokeswoman for the city's Department of Planning and Development. "That's evident by the number of homes and residences that are being developed all throughout the city."

Among the nation's 10 largest counties, Maricopa County (Phoenix area) recorded the largest gain--14 percent--between 2000 and 2004. Los Angeles County, the nation's largest, grew by 4.4 percent.

Although Kendall and Will Counties were the only two in the metropolitan area to record population increases large enough to make the top census rankings, all of the collar counties added enough residents from 2003 to 2004 to be among the top half of U.S. counties for percentage gain.

West suburban Kane County recorded an estimated 3.1 percent increase in population, followed by McHenry County (2.7 percent), Lake County (1.6 percent) and DuPage County (0.5 percent).
 

·
born again cyclist
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
bah. more census "estimate" nonsense.

the census bureau couldn't "estimate" themselves through an open doorway. they're really good at keeping track of the white folk, but it's all those wily brown people that always **** up the census bureau's ability to "estimate" population movement and growth. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Cook County is not losing any population. Wont the census be suprised when Cook County surpasses 6 million in the next census? ;)

yeah, that wont happen. :p but its definatly growing. Chicago's population gain should be impressive by 2010 as well.
 

·
The Jive is Alive.
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
Population fluctuations don't necessarily correlate with a city's health. Chicago is in better shape today on the whole than it was in 2000, even if its overall population dropped a little.

What is hard to grasp is the decrease of population amidst a continuing boom in downtown Chicago and many inner neighborhoods. But we can't ignore that there are plenty of people in the less popular neighborhoods who have been dreaming of a house with a yard in the suburbs.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,217 Posts
Tons of people from Vitmense town(Arglye, broadway(5000N + 1200W)) move to the suburbs. I know many that did, myself. Moveto Dupage's suburbs, by I-355 near Itasca and Addison. There even a huge new AZN super market there call "food harbor" so the azns living, there dont need to travel to chinatown or Vitenmense town.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
The Urban Politician said:
Not only that, but isn't it better that families are leaving the city because it's too expensive, rather than because it's too dirty, crime-ridden, and run-down? Hmmm, it's gotta make you wonder...
TUP you make it sound like the whole city of chicago is becoming one big manhattan, well i'm happy to tell you that it isn't. Chicago is still really really really really afordable from the east garfield park to even a more gentrified neighborhood like Edgewater. The people that do move out of areas like Bucktown, Ukraninan Village, or Lincoln Sqaure a lot of times end up moving to adjacent neighborhoods and it's the people in the adjacent neighborhoods that move to the next adjacent neighborhood until people are pushed into the suburbs. Why are people being pushed out because a lot of times the people leaving gentrified neighborhoods are mexicans who are arriving in white middle class neighborhoods where they aren't welcomed so kindly. So
The reason i think most people are leaving is because pure racism. If you look at the census data for neighborhoods like Belmont-Craigan on the Northwest Side or West Lawn on the Southwest side, you notice mexicans moving in and white middle class ethnic europeans moving out. Though i must admit that the large migration of mexican immigrants in the last decade has been benificial to the city, we could be a lot better off right now if the city thought of a way to keep these people from fleeing the neighborhoods mexicans moved into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,278 Posts
JivecitySTL said:
Population fluctuations don't necessarily correlate with a city's health. Chicago is in better shape today on the whole than it was in 2000, even if its overall population dropped a little.

What is hard to grasp is the decrease of population amidst a continuing boom in downtown Chicago and many inner neighborhoods. But we can't ignore that there are plenty of people in the less popular neighborhoods who have been dreaming of a house with a yard in the suburbs.
Yes over all, the city is in MUCH better shape today than in 2000.

Also, don't forget that throughout the 1990's the census kept Chicago's population estimates on the decline. I think in 1998 they had estimated the city's population to be 2,720,000. They were off by 180,000. So if the current census estimate has Chicago 50,000 less than in 2000, I would speculate that in reality it probably has remained at 2,900,000 or quite possibly grown some. On the other hand, the city (and most of Cook County) has become a bit more expensive for many lower income households (which inturn have traditionally larger families), which may drive people out of the city towards less expensive suburbs in the collar counties.
 

·
The City
Joined
·
5,935 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ThirdCoast312 said:
TUP you make it sound like the whole city of chicago is becoming one big manhattan, well i'm happy to tell you that it isn't. Chicago is still really really really really afordable from the east garfield park to even a more gentrified neighborhood like Edgewater...

Certainly I'm aware that there are many factors involved, and race is one of them. But you can't deny that numerous Chicago neighborhoods have become too expensive for many immigrant/minority groups to afford living in.
Even if racism has driven Latinos out of certain neighborhoods, this racism has often manifested itself through gentrification and these ethnic groups getting priced out of their own neighborhoods. This process is occurring throughout the city, and will slowly (but surely) saturate much of the north and near west sides. Eventually, only the south side will remain.

My point was that if people are leaving their neighborhoods/the city, I would rather have them leave because the neighborhood is too expensive, not because the city is crime-ridden and run-down. This doesn't mean I condone racism--I'm Asian myself.
 

·
Cynical post-collegiate
Joined
·
937 Posts
I'm highly skeptical about the census bureau estimates. Their methodology doesn't properly take into account immigration and the like, and their "estimates" have been occasionally quite far off, especially in 1990-2000.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top