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Rethinking corruption in Africa
Oct 11, 2012





Corruption in Africa is no different to corruption anywhere else on the planet, according to a new book by the former chair of graft watchdog Transparency International. The image of Africa as a continent beset by corruption has dominated the popular imagination for decades, reinforced by its consistently dismal performance in anti-corruption league tables.

From routine demands for bribes by policemen to grand scale looting of state funds by its rulers, corruption has been blamed for stunting Africa's growth, keeping millions in poverty and scaring off investors.

But now may be the time for international investors especially to reconsider their perceptions. In "Global Corruption: Money, Power and Ethics in the Modern World," Laurence Cockcroft argues that the main drivers of corruption, including the informal economy, political funding, the role of multinationals and organised crime, are common to many countries and graft is not intrinsic to Africa. "The pattern of corruption which occurs in Africa is remarkably similar to that elsewhere," Cockcroft told Reuters. "This is an international phenomenon and it's certainly not a uniquely African issue."

Cockcroft does not deny that corruption is a huge problem in Africa. While average GDP growth of around 5 percent over the last decade has led to higher urban living standards, life for poor, rural dwellers in the bulk of sub-Saharan Africa has not improved because governments cannot deliver basic services, he said.

The book has no shortage of examples of African kleptocracy, from Mobutu Sese Seko in Zaire -- now Democratic Republic of the Congo -- to Nigeria, where oil wealth has brought prosperity to only a few. Still, Cockcroft finds equally egregious examples in other parts of the world, and of the "mega corruption scandals" over the last 25 years, not one has been in Africa.

He cites former Indonesian president Suharto, whose family amassed a fortune of at least $15 billion; the presidency of Alberto Fujimori in Peru in the 1990s, where corruption is believed to have halved the revenue due to the government; and India, where a 2008 telecoms licensing scandal cost the government an estimated $30 billion in lost revenue.

More recently, he points to Russia, where protests since December against President Vladimir Putin's 12-year rule have focused on corruption, and the downfall of former politician Bo Xilai in China after his wife murdered a British businessman. "We can safely say that these dramas in relation to corruption which are happening outside Africa are at least the equal and in many cases on a grander scale than what happens in Africa itself," Cockcroft said.

He reckons Africa has been unfairly singled out when it comes to corruption in part because of the legacy view of the late colonial period.
"People have taken a very gloomy view of what's happened in Africa since independence, sometimes with justification and sometimes not," he said. "Some of that is built into this assumption that if you talk about corruption you're talking about Africa." It is true that many African countries languish in the lower half of most anti-corruption indices, although in Transparency's latest Corruption Perceptions Index, the bottom 10 has only two African states -- Somalia and Sudan.The annual index ranks countries from 0, highly corrupt, to 10, -- very clean). Most African nations score below 4.

The most urgent priority for African governments, Cockcroft argues, is to reduce the size of the shadow economy, estimated to be as much as 60 percent of GDP in Tanzania. He describes it as "a huge reservoir for bribes" and payments that are completely untraceable. "It doesn't matter what the legislation is," he said. "As long as you have a huge informal sector, people can still buy off officials in city hall."

There are no clear cut success stories in the fight against corruption in Africa, he notes, as former opposition leaders who come to power on anti-corruption tickets are often derailed by the desire to remain in power.

But he adds that one leader who could buck the trend is Zambia's president Michael Sata, whose government has reversed a number of privatisation deals initiated under the previous regime. Cockcroft says Zambia and Ghana, which also seems serious about tackling graft, will be the countries to watch.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/11/africa-money-idAFL6E8LAF8K20121011
 

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Africa: Twelve Countries Rank in Top 75 on Anti-Corruption Index
6 December 2012





Twelve African countries are ranked among the 75 least corrupt nations in the world, according to the 2012 index published Wednesday by Transparency International.

Published annually, the Corruption Perceptions Index draws upon a range of data sources to determine how corrupt countries' public sectors are perceived to be. On a scale from 100 (highly clean) to 0 (highly corrupt), two-thirds of all countries scored below 50. This year's survey includes 176 countries, down from 182 in 2011.

The top eight in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) in 2012 also led the list in 2011, with approximately the same global rankings, ranging from 65 to 43. Liberia - at number 11 in sub-Sahara with a score of 41 - saw its global ranking rise 16 points – from number 91 last year to 75 in 2012.

Botswana, Cape Verde, Mauritius, Rwanda, Namibia, Ghana and Lesotho led the SSA rankings, along with South Africa, which dropped two places this year - to nine from seven. Gambia, which was ninth last year, dropped this year to 21 in SSA and 105 globally. Tunisia, which is grouped with Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries, is tied with Liberia at 75 on the global rankings.

Nigeria and Kenya both received the low ranking of 139, compared with 143 for Nigeria and 154 for Kenya in 2011. Cameroun, the Congo Republic (Brazzaville) and the Central African Republic are ranked 144. Angola is 157, DR Congo 160 and Equatorial Guinea 163. Crowding the bottom among the most corrupt in the world are Chad (163), Sudan (173 and Somalia (174 - last).


Below are rankings (SSA/Global) and scores for all SSA countries in the index:

1/30 Botswana 65
2/39 Cape Verde 60
3/43 Mauritius 57
4/50 Rwanda 53
5/51 Seychelles 52
6/58 Namibia 48
7/64 Ghana 45
7/64 Lesotho 45
9/69 South Africa 43
10/72 Sao Tome and Principe 42
11/75 Liberia 41
12/83 Burkina Faso 38
13/88 Malawi 37
13/88 Swaziland 37
13/88 Zambia 37
16/94 Benin 36
16/94 Djibouti 36
16/94 Senegal 36
19/102 Gabon 35
19/102 Tanzania 35
21/105 Gambia 34
21/105 Mali 34
23/113 Ethiopia 33
23/113 Niger 33
25/118 Madagascar 32
26/123 Mauritania 31
126/23 Mozambique 31
26/123 Sierra Leone 31
29/128 Togo 30
30/130 Côte d´Ivoire 29
30/130 Uganda 29
32/133 Comoros 28
33/139 Kenya 27
33/139 Nigeria 27
35/144 Cameroon 26
35/144 Central African Republic 26
35/144 Congo Republic 26
38/150 Eritrea 25
38/150 Guinea-Bissau 25
40/154 Guinea 24
41/157 Angola 22
42/160 Democratic Republic of the Congo 21
43/163 Equatorial Guinea 20
43/163 Zimbabwe 20
45/165 Burundi 19
45/165 Chad 19
47/173 Sudan 13
48/174 Somalia 8

The full list is available here: http://issuu.com/transparencyinternational/docs/cpi_2012_report/5
http://allafrica.com/stories/201212060924.html
 

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Botswana Again Wins Title as Africa’s Least Corrupt Nation
December 04, 2012




JOHANNESBURG— The southern African nation of Botswana has again captured the title of Africa’s least corrupt nation, according to an annual report by watchdog Transparency International. A spokesman for Botswana's anti-corruption agency says the mineral-rich nation has worked hard to keep its hands clean.

Transparency International’s map of Africa is mostly shaded in intense oranges and reds, with the darkest red signaling perceptions of deep-seated corruption.

It is hardly a surprise that war-torn Somalia bottoms out the list, along with Afghanistan and North Korea. The Horn of Africa nation hasn’t had a functioning government for more than two decades. But in that sunset-colored map of Africa, Botswana stands out as is the lone splash of yellow on the continent. It’s nearly the same sunny shade as Spain and the United States, though not as bright as Norway and Australia.

Lentswe Motshoganetsi, a spokesman for Botswana’s anti-corruption agency, says the government has made a concerted effort to educate citizens about corruption and prosecute cases of corruption. “We’ve done a lot, and then even our prosecution rate is high by international standards. I want to believe that those are some of the issues, or some of the areas that Transparency International looks into when they do their listing, or their findings," he said.

Motshoganetsi says protecting against corruption is important for a small and resource-rich nation like Botswana. The nation has great mineral wealth, including diamonds, which has been a cause of corruption and violence in nations like Liberia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. “Corruption can cause civil wars between a country like this; corruption can annihilate all the assets the country has made. So it is important that we have the checks and balances through the anti-corruption agency, which we can make sure that will prolong these minerals, or the wealth, that this country is currently standing on," he said.


The five least corrupt African nations have one thing in common: they are all small in population. Botswana has just two million people. Botswana has also been ruled by one party since its independence in 1966, which has led some to criticize its shining reputation.

Indigenous rights watchdog Survival International has also criticized the government and says it has harassed and unfairly treated the indigenous San people. Motshoganetsi, as a spokesman for the anti-corruption agency, said he couldn’t speak about governance issues. But he agreed that Botswana has more work to do.

African population centers fared worse in the Transparency International report: South Africa, for instance, scored a mediocre 43 rating. This is a country that sees regular corruption scandals, including a possible investigation into the president for alleged government-funded improvements to his country home. Zimbabwe pulled southern Africa’s lowest score and fell nine places from its already poor ranking last year. Rights groups have reported a rise in political violence, likely committed by the ruling party, in recent months.

Botswana may be an African leader, with a score of 65 to Somalia’s dismal eight. But it has a way to go before it reaches the top of the class, where Denmark, Finland and New Zealand tied for first place with a squeaky-clean score of 90.




http://www.voanews.com/content/bots...-as-africas-least-corrupt-nation/1558608.html
 

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BS about maltreatment of the San. Its westerners who want a primitive group of people to obsess over. Any talks of modernisation is talked off in western media as 'abuse'.
 

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Y do you all put so much value on this lists, the most corrupt is the first world. WAKE UP!!!!!!!
 

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Senegal's Karim Wade charged with corruption
Apr 15 2013

Karim Wade Prosecutors announced an investigation into Mr Wade last year

The son of Senegal's former President Abdoulaye Wade is in police custody after being charged with corruption in connection with his personal fortune.

Karim Wade denies the accusations that he illegally amassed about $1.4bn (£900m) during his father's rule.

The 44-year-old was a senior minister during his father's rule from 2000 to 2012, and was in charge of major infrastructure and energy projects.

Mr Wade is alleged to have acquired several foreign firms by illicit means.

He was arrested on Monday, just hours after his lawyers submitted documents relating to his assets to a courthouse.


'Minister of earth and sky'
Prosecutors announced an investigation into Mr Wade and five other former ministers last year.

It followed the defeat of Abdoulaye Wade in the March 2012 presidential election by Macky Sall, who pledged to fight corruption.

During Abdoulaye Wade's 12-year rule, Karim Wade held several ministerial posts simultaneously, including minister for infrastructure and air transportation.

His large portfolio led to him being dubbed "the minister of the earth and the sky", but it also put him in charge of a large proportion of Senegal's government budget at a time of large-scale infrastructure spending.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/15/us-senegal-corruption-wade-idUSBRE93E0VO20130415
 

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Corruption is not corruption.

I said a long time ago, that the problem is not nessarily the corruption, the problem is that the type of corruption. When much of the corruption is embezzlement, false contracts and inflated contracts, we are not really speaking of the same form of corruption as in Asia for example. When we have Nigerian government officials investing in property in London, Singapore and Dubai, we are not talking of the same type of corruption. When we speak of money wasted in destinations such as Capetown, we are not talking about the same type of corruption.

There is corruption that works the economy and there is corruption that doesn't . Most of the corruption in Nigeria is not working the economy.

There are branches of corruption in Nigeria that work the economy. You can mention Transcorp or Arik Air. You can even mention Dangote or Alakija (If I may), you can mention the American University of Nigeria, you can mention LCC in Lagos etc

All these are laden with corruption, but they are working the economy.

but most of the corruption in Nigeria is not in this form, most are in the form of inefficiencies, inflated contracts or nonexistent contracts.

And of course there is the profit mentality. "As long, as I am making money, it doesn't matter what my objectives are" There is no regulation, to protect the economy. So some investors and some officials, may be taking the economy backwards, even if they are investing. I want to ask..........what are some of these people investing in?

When you dedicate a large sum of your expenditure to imports or inefficient practices, does it really matter if you are investing?

So...............no Corruption is not corruption. The corruption in Indonesia or Thailand makes more sense than the corruption in Africa.

You cannot look at corruption, on a dollar for dollar basis.
 

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Kofi Annan: Africa plundered by secret mining deals
10 May 2013


Tax avoidance, secret mining deals and financial transfers are depriving Africa of the benefits of its resources boom, ex-UN chief Kofi Annan has said.
Firms that shift profits to lower tax jurisdictions cost Africa $38bn (£25bn) a year, says a report produced by a panel he heads.

"Africa loses twice as much money through these loopholes as it gets from donors," Mr Annan told the BBC.

It was like taking food off the tables of the poor, he said.

The Africa Progress Report is released every May - produced by a panel of 10 prominent figures, including former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo and Graca Machel, the wife of South African ex-President Nelson Mandela.


'Highly opaque'
African countries needed to improve governance and the world's richest nations should help introduce global rules on transparency and taxation, Mr Annan said.

The report gave the Democratic Republic of Congo as an example, where between 2010 and 2012 five under-priced mining concessions were sold in "highly opaque and secretive deals".


This cost the country, which the charity Save the Children said earlier this week was the world's worst place to be a mother, $1.3bn in revenues.

This figure was equivalent to double DR Congo's health and education budgets combined, the report said.

DR Congo's mining minister disputed the findings, saying the country had "lost nothing".

"These assets were ceded in total transparency," Martin Kabwelulu told Reuters news agency.

The report added that many mineral-rich countries needed "urgently to review the design of their tax regimes", which were designed to attract foreign investment when commodity prices were low.

It quotes a review in Zambia which found that between 2005 and 2009, 500,000 copper mine workers were paying a higher rate of tax than major multinational mining firms.

Africa loses more through what it calls "illicit outflows" than it gets in aid and foreign direct investment, it explains.

"We are not getting the revenues we deserve often because of either corrupt practices, transfer pricing, tax evasion and all sorts of activities that deprive us of our due,"
Mr Annan told the BBC's Newsday programme.

"Transparency is a powerful tool," he said, adding that the report was urging African leaders to put "accountability centre stage".

Mr Annan said African governments needed to insist that local companies became involved in mining deals and manage them in "such a way that it also creates employment".

"This Africa cannot do alone. The tax evasion, avoidance, secret bank accounts are problems for the world… so we all need to work together particularly the G8, as they meet next month, to work to ensure we have a multilateral solution to this crisis," he said.

For richer nations "if a company avoids tax or transfers the money to offshore account what they lose is revenues", Mr Annan said.

"Here on our continent, it affects the life of women and children - in effect in some situations it is like taking food off the table for the poor."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-22478994
 

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Djibouti: Anti-Corruption Initiative Launched

DJIBOUTI – (Somalilandsun) - The Inspector General of Djibouti today launched "Anti-Corruption Djibouti", a new initiative aimed at raising awareness of the country's anticorruption efforts and facilitating closer collaboration with international partners.

Anti-Corruption Djibouti was launched with a new website in French and English – www.anticorruptiondjibouti.com which provides further details of the country's efforts to strengthen governance and transparency regarding the management of public funds, its work with international organisations and highlights of successes to date.

Inspector General Hassan Sultan said: "This initiative is a reflection of the political will dedicated to fighting corruption across Djibouti's public sector and the reforms already being enacted. From procurement processes to election reform to international cooperation, corruption can negatively impact a wide range of important state functions and it is our responsibility to root it wherever it is found."

The website will serve as a portal for news and developments in the Inspector General's fight against corruption in Djibouti. Interested stakeholders can also follow the Inspector General on Twitter at: www.twitter.com/InspectGenDj .

In its fight against corruption at all levels, Djibouti has developed partnerships with regional and international institutions including the UN Development Programme, the World Bank International Corruption Hunters Alliance (ICHA), the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), the European Commission's AIDCO, the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the Forum of African Inspector Generals (FIGE).
source

^^ I will be surprised if anything comes out of this.
 

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Switzerland to return Sani Abacha 'loot' to Nigeria
17 March 2015

Switzerland will return to Nigeria some $380m (£260m) allegedly looted by ex-military ruler Sani Abacha, an official has said.

The transfer, to be conducted under the supervision of the World Bank, will end a 16-year case against the Abacha family.

Switzerland has already returned $700m, following appeals from Nigeria.

Abacha ruled the oil-rich West African state with an iron-fist from 1993 until his death in 1998.

Soon thereafter, Nigeria's new rulers asked Switzerland to help it recover $2.2bn that he had reportedly stashed in European bank accounts.

...
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-31933083
 

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In Morocco, there is a website to denounce corruption:

http://www.stopcorruption.ma/

Also, people tend to upload videos of corruption attempts on Youtube, which is usually followed by an investigation, arrests, and many police officers got fired thanks to these videos... We even had a famous Youtuber called "The Targuist hunter", who was catching on tape corruption attempts in his city of Targuist.
 

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DRC loses up to $15 billion yearly due to fraud
December 10, 2015

Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) president’s anti-corruption adviser on Wednesday said the central African country loses up to $15 billion yearly due to fraud.

During an interview with local radio, Luzolo Bambi, a counsellor to President Joseph Kabila on graft and money laundering said corruption existed at some of the highest levels of government. “When you have an evasion, a leak, a fraud evaluated at 10 to 15 billion … dollars per year … it’s up to the head of state to reverse that trend,” Bambi said.

High growth in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) over the past decade has been largely driven by the mining industry, and analysts believe it will continue to be one of sub-Saharan Africa’s fastest growing economies over the next decade, with growth rates well above 6%.

However, Congo, Africa’s leading copper producer and boasts abundant reserves of gold, diamonds and cobalt ranks 186 out 187 on the U.N. Human Development Index, largely due to endemic corruption.
The country also ranks 154 out of 175 countries on Transparency International’s corruption perceptions index.

Last June, President Joseph Kabila filed a criminal complaint against more than a dozen current and former government officials for fraud and corruption. The complaint includes allegations of accepting bribes and defrauding customs services. The public prosecutor’s office said the dossier is sealed and has refused to name anyone mentioned in it.

http://medafricatimes.com/7428-drc-loses-up-to-15-billion-yearly-due-to-fraud.html
 

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In general, poorer countries are more corrupt than richer countries, but there are so many exception.

I do not trust data from Transparent International, which is controlled by the US. A very basic question, if North Korea is so corrupt (rank almost at the bottom), why the US, with so much money, cannot simply buy their government staff and let the whole system collapse. The basic definition of corruption is that you can buy government staff, right?

In fact, I believe North Korea is as clean as any country in the West, if not more. And if Italy is so clean (relatively), why organized crime there have thrived for so long?
 

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Corruption is not corruption.

I said a long time ago, that the problem is not nessarily the corruption, the problem is that the type of corruption. When much of the corruption is embezzlement, false contracts and inflated contracts, we are not really speaking of the same form of corruption as in Asia for example. When we have Nigerian government officials investing in property in London, Singapore and Dubai, we are not talking of the same type of corruption. When we speak of money wasted in destinations such as Capetown, we are not talking about the same type of corruption.

There is corruption that works the economy and there is corruption that doesn't . Most of the corruption in Nigeria is not working the economy.

There are branches of corruption in Nigeria that work the economy. You can mention Transcorp or Arik Air. You can even mention Dangote or Alakija (If I may), you can mention the American University of Nigeria, you can mention LCC in Lagos etc

All these are laden with corruption, but they are working the economy.

but most of the corruption in Nigeria is not in this form, most are in the form of inefficiencies, inflated contracts or nonexistent contracts.

And of course there is the profit mentality. "As long, as I am making money, it doesn't matter what my objectives are" There is no regulation, to protect the economy. So some investors and some officials, may be taking the economy backwards, even if they are investing. I want to ask..........what are some of these people investing in?

When you dedicate a large sum of your expenditure to imports or inefficient practices, does it really matter if you are investing?

So...............no Corruption is not corruption. The corruption in Indonesia or Thailand makes more sense than the corruption in Africa.

You cannot look at corruption, on a dollar for dollar basis.
Here in Africa we want to eat the cake before the bake. Yes these imports are never of economic value but meant for luxury. Say instead of importing what matters like construction machines, cotton ginnery equipment, textile sewing/weaving machinery, knowledge by hiring foreign lecturers; People import cars,latest fashion, expensive jewelry, electronics, electrical appliances, buying luxury apartments in Dubai and more surprising food imports. The urge to own a car is highly prioritized and one owns it is respected in their community.
 

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They got 10 billions Euro worth projects and the fuccing algerian justice fined them 37,000 dollars that they contest...............:eek:hno:

By:petroglobalnews.com
Saipem will appeal Algeria price fixing fine

Italian services firm Saipem said Wednesday that it will appeal a $37,000 fine handed down in connection with a corruption trial in Algeria.

An Algerian criminal court imposed a four million dinar, or about $37,104, fine against Saipem Contracting Algerie on Tuesday for allegedly inflating the price of a gas pipeline construction contract.

The contract was awarded by Algeria’s Sonatrach in 2009 and was worth about $477 million, Reuters said.

Saipem has denied any wrongdoing and told Reuters that it did not inflate prices above market rates.

The company said it will appeal the ruling.

No timeline for the appeal has been disclosed yet.

Saipem added that the Algerian court also approved a request to unfreeze two of the company’s bank accounts that had been frozen in 2010 in connection with the pipeline case.

Six men, including Sonatrach’s former CEO Mohamed Meziane, were sentenced to years long jail terms on Tuesday for charges ranging from money laundering and bribery to embezzlement as part of the same case.





The fine is just the latest legal hurdle Saipem is facing in connection with its Algerian operations.

In October, a Milan judge ordered Saipem and three of its former top executives along with two alleged intermediaries from Algeria to stand trial on charges of tax fraud and international corruption.

The company allegedly paid out $217 million in bribes to win contracts with Sonatrach worth about $9 billion.

“Saipem acknowledges the judge’s decision and is confident that it will be able to demonstrate that there are no grounds for the company to be held liable under Italian Legislative Decree 231/2001 at the first instance trial,” Saipem said when the order was issued................See more
 
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