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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Despite crasbarriers are important part of road infrastructure, we don't have thread dedicated to them yet (or i couldn't find it).
As you all know, shiny crashbarrier is a detrminant of high-tech road. So let's have a review of crashbarriers in different countries.

Poland:
Steel:
A1 near Grudziądz. Double crashbarrier.


A6. Two single crashbarriers.




S7 Jedlińsk-Gójec (picture by Kronos KBC)


A1 exit near Toruń.


Concrete:
S7 Jedlińsk-Grójec (picture by Kronos KBC)


More to come...
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Czech Republic
Steel:

D11


D1



Steel rope (eggcutters :D):
Road nr 10 near Harrachov


D11



Concrete:
D11





Curiosity:
No crashbarrier on expressway :nuts:


 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Germany:

Steel:
A11




A71


A2


Concrete:
A4 near Koln.


Concrete + steel.
B224/A46 flyover.


Temporary crashbarrier (Steel?) A1 Koln->Dortmund
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Croatia:

Steel:
A1










Jadranska Magistrala






Road connecting A1 and JM


Road connecting A1 and 1


Bridge on river Kupa


Concrete:




Concrete+steel:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Switzerland:

Road 16.




A1 St. Gallen->Zurich.


Concrete+steel:
A2 Basel.


Temporary crashbarrier on A2/3 near Augst.
 

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I think the steel crashbarrier are the best aesthetic looking, especially when there's a little grass in the median. It makes the freeway looks less massive. However, in urban area's i prefer the Jersey barrier because of space usage reduction. I think some countries are doing a good job landscaping the median with plants, however if you don't keep them nice, they end up looking Belgian, which is not good.
 

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For motorbikes:


New: lower part for "normal" cars, upper part extra for TIR's (in Germany (12000 km of motorways) there are 300 km of this one yet (on dangerous spots (bridges, hills ect.))):
 

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Radi will be happy. :D
Exactly what I was thinking. They have to be shiny though. :cheers:



I prefer the words concrete barrier and guardrail though. Crashbarrier sounds weird to me. Also I've noticed a recent trend with using cable barriers in medians recently and it makes me wonder how well they really work. It looks like an 18-wheeler could easily plow through one of those while it whips excess cable through car windshields seriously injuring other people.
 

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Seriously Bohemian
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The cable barriers are actually safer and harder to break through barriers than the ordinary ones from steel plates. Another advantage is that they can absorb much of the energy of the impact making the deceleration smoother and not bouncing cars back to the traffic as concrete barriers do. The only downside is they are really nasty to bikers.
 

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I will answer but I am busy this time, unfortunately I havn´t taken good pics of the Struma crashbarriers, when they still were shiny.
 

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Ministry of Truth
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Exactly what I was thinking. They have to be shiny though. :cheers:



I prefer the words concrete barrier and guardrail though. Crashbarrier sounds weird to me. Also I've noticed a recent trend with using cable barriers in medians recently and it makes me wonder how well they really work. It looks like an 18-wheeler could easily plow through one of those while it whips excess cable through car windshields seriously injuring other people.
Don't tell me, a branch of my company sells that stuff and everybody stares at me when I say "guardtail" which is -by the way- they name we call them here in Italy.

May I add a few general comments?

a) Steel wire: dunno, looks scary, what if a biker runs into it? Sliced ham?
b) Concrete has some advantages, but need s replacement, since it gets brittle with age, pretty much defeating the purpose of installing a New Jersey. Plus I've noticed that more and more concrete barriers are being replaced with double layer steel barriers. You know the kind that looks like two parallel guardrails connected by horizontal bracings. The 540 km Turin to Venice A4 is an example of steel coming back.
c) I'm a bit surprised by how filmsy most of the guardrails posted here look...most of them would be good for a main throughfare but not for a highway. Mainly the ones between the carriages...it's the fast lane people!
d) The Shining :) Metal tends to react with air, Galvanized barriers, mainly where you have metal on metal contact like around nuts and bolts, suffer from zinc oxydation, resulting in a whithish salt soiling the shiny new surface. On time this paves the way to red rust which means corrosion and elements needing to be replaced in order to maintain safety specifications. On the other hand you have the ugly looking Corten steel. I know it look terrible and new Corten barriers look really rusty. This kind of steel reacts with oxygen by creating a thin layer od oxides but the reaction does not go through steel. Corten barriers turn brownish in time and don't look appealing but they maintain excellent mechanical properties through the years, offering low maintenacne costs and consisten safety all the time. A typical example is the A22 Brenner Highway/ Autobahn running by my town. A private toll road run by an international consortium...not exactly the epitome of lack of funding...
 

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Ministry of Truth
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exactly. The first layer takes the sheer force of the impact and sends it through the bracings that in case of extrem force pops up. The inner layer holds the vehicule, let's say a truck which has lost mot of the kinetics in the meanwhile- and prevents it from going stray in the opposite carriage.

I heard there might be a guy offering you some steel polish, though :)
 
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