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the Nicosia orbital motorway [...]

The entire project, expected to be completed in five phases, will cost around €350m.
I think they mean only the southern part of the ring road. Will Nicosia ever have a complete "orbital" ring around it, with the current political situation?
 

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I'm guessing that by 'orbital motorway', the mean the A1 to A9 segment on the south side of Nicosia. I don't see them constructing a complete ring road through North Cyprus.
 

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I'm guessing that by 'orbital motorway', the mean the A1 to A9 segment on the south side of Nicosia. I don't see them constructing a complete ring road through North Cyprus.

Somewhere I have heard that they would actually have plans for a whole ring around Nicosia. Thus, this motorway would then also pass through the northern parts of Nicosia. Maps and other things would be ready for it, and that they would know exactly how this would go.

But on the basis of the political situation in Cyprus, there is no decision on any northern part of this ring. Instead, they wait for the situation to change as regards the relationship between the northern and southern parts of Cyprus.
 

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Some shots of the very countryside F943 road between Ayios Theodoros and Spilia, in the Troodos hills. Photos taken in Winter 2018:

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Highest road in Cyprus: F935, branching off B9 (a main road through the Troodos mountains) and ending at Mount Olympus, the highest peak in the country at just below 2000m.
The very summit is not accessible due to an active military base located there. Its surroundings host 4 ski slopes.
These photos taken in December 2018 show the end of the road.

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5. And where you ski:

 

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I'm in Cyprus now, and some small observations:

- The motorway speed limit is 100km/h, in practice, most traffic is going between 100-130km/h. No-one is driving excessively fast, and 112km/h on the cruise control seems to be fine.
- Driving standards are worse in the South than in the North (!). They're both much better than in Poland, but people are driving slower and with more consideration in the North.
- Not much traffic police around on either side of the border.
- Roads are significantly worse in the North, particularly between Deryneia and Famagusta - probably because this road only recently opened for international traffic.
- No issues whatsoever with driving a Southern car in the North, but it's very noticeable that very few cars cross the border. The only place in the South where I've seen a large number of Northern cars is in Pyla, the mixed Greek-Turkish village. There were some Southern-registered cars in Famagusta, but these were likely owned by Turkish Cypriots who wanted the convenience of having their car registered there.
- Huge amounts of graffiti on road signs in the South.
- The roads in the SBAs (British bases) are different - they use cats eyes everywhere for instance, or pedestrian crossings have additional barriers, or zebra crossings have additional markings. They're also highlighting that speeds are in km/h.
- Northern Cyprus has faster speed limits - I've seen a 90km/h north of Famagusta for instance. However, they're really bad at marking speed limits.
- red light creeping is awful in the South - you'll see drivers go 5m or more beyond the red light line. Haven't seen many traffic lights at all in the North.

More to come...:)
 

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When I visited Cyprus in 2012 we were told not to cross the border into the North with our rental car since there could be issues with insurance payments if something happens over there. No problem crossing the border on foot, however, and just with my ID-card.
 

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^^ What I was told (or could read in the contract and the rental conditions) is just that, in a little more detail. Namely, the coverage you have to buy when crossing to the occupied area is a third party liability insurance with the unique purpose of covering the other party in case of accident. On some forum it was even disputed if that insurance covers anything at all or is just a money making scheme and effectively a worthless piece of paper.
All of the vehicle's ordinary coverage (liability, theft, CDW, ...) is void for any incident occurring in the North. Needless to say that in case of an accident between a local in the North and a tourist from the South, chances are the tourist will be held liable with the police report stating so, thus he should not expect to receive anything from the local party's insurance. One of the risks is thus suddenly owing the vehicle's current value to the rental agency in case it gets totalled during an excursion to the North.

Whether the rental contract allows you to cross at all depends on the company. I found it pretty common to be allowed, they just put great emphasis on the additional risks that come with it. They usually state that no assistance whatsoever can be provided in the Turkish controlled area. In practice, that can mean a North based assistance would have to tow the vehicle to the separation line if it gets immobilized.

That said, crossing by vehicle appears to be routine, in Famagusta I saw numerous South plates, both red rental and ordinary white.

Interestingly, my rental contract prohibited to take the vehicle off the island, even though it authorized crossing to the North.
 

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I asked them when buying the insurance, and they said that it's basic third party cover - it covers damage caused by the driver towards property and people. It seems that there were previous scams involving insurance, but what they issue now looks like a real insurance policy.

Interestingly, I asked the car hire company about that insurance, and they said that after a hire car was wrecked there by a car registered in the north, the insurance company of the guy who caused the accident did pay for it to be taken to the nearest border crossing. The police were apparently very fair about the whole thing, and the insurance company in the North paid for the repairs directly to the car hire company. But, they said that they didn't have much experience, and no-one working there had ever been to Northern Cyprus, so they didn't have any official way of helping. They did say that if the car breaks down there, I could call them and they would try and arrange help if they could, but that in the worst case scenario, I'd have to get the car taken to the border at my expense.

For what it's worth, I saw plenty of RoC-registered cars in Kryenia, North Nicosia and Famagusta...
 

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The media report that the construction of a motorway from Limassol to Saittas will commence in September 2020. This is a 7 kilometer segment between A1 at Kato Polemidia and Palodia, for € 26 million. English Wikipedia lists this motorway as A8.


 

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Piece of A3 driving eastward, between entry ramp Oroklini and exit Xylofagou. Photos taken in Winter 2018.

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3. Main towns signposted are Agia Napa, the renowned tourist/beach destination, and Paralimni, the temporary administrative centre of the Famagusta District (with the district's actual centre, Famagusta City, being located in the Turkish occupied area)


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10. Exiting, photo got blurry, so cannot reconstruct which exact exit it was, must have been near Xylofagou.


11. On E305, Xylofagou ahead
 

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A more forgotten part of Cyprus, and the world... the northern third.... aka KKTC

Seems like the unrecognized country has developed an independent road numbering system of its own, inspired by the system in Turkey.

D.## defines state roads, 2 digits vs Turkey's 3. I have identified from pictures posted by others online, that there are D.05, D.10, D.15, D.20, D.25, D.30, D.35, D.45, even numbers EW, odd numbers NS

LL.##, district roads. as opposed to Turkey's ##.##, where the two numbers indicating the code for each province is used, two letters are used. (LK: Lefke, GZ: Guzelyurt, LF: Lefkosha (Nicosia), GR: Girne, GZ: Gazi Magusta (Famagusta), IK: Iskele)
source (outdated D level numbers, but useful of the district level numbers) : Here








142951


142953


142954


142961
 

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3. Main towns signposted are Agia Napa, the renowned tourist/beach destination, and Paralimni, the temporary administrative centre of the Famagusta District (with the district's actual centre, Famagusta City, being located in the Turkish occupied area)
I found this very strange when I was there. Deryneia is signposted as well now (on separate signs), but I found it interesting that you don't see signs in government-controlled territories for locations in North Cyprus. I think Ammochostos might be signed a couple of times on the A3, but that's it.

It's the same story in North Cyprus too - while there are some signs (like for Larnaca in Famagusta), most new signs just point to the 'gate' and not the cities. It's especially strange in North Nicosia, where you'd expect to see signs for South Nicosia, yet there are none.

There's also no standard for signing the English names in North Cyprus - sometimes just Girne, other times Girne - Kyrenia.
 

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A more forgotten part of Cyprus, and the world... the northern third.... aka KKTC
Seems like the unrecognized country has developed an independent road numbering system of its own, inspired by the system in Turkey.
I read that the road numbering system was introduced in 2013. Does anyone has a (full) route list or an official map?
 

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It's interesting and weird at the same time to see Turkish-looking signs in a left-driving area.
 

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During the 1950s, when Cyprus was to be free from British power, there were large groups trying to get Cyprus to become a part of Greece. If this had become a reality then I do not think that Cyprus had retained its left-hand traffic. They probably had to switch to right-hand traffic.

Now Cyprus never became a part of Greece. They became independent instead and left-hand traffic remained :D
 

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I found this very strange when I was there. Deryneia is signposted as well now (on separate signs), but I found it interesting that you don't see signs in government-controlled territories for locations in North Cyprus. I think Ammochostos might be signed a couple of times on the A3, but that's it.

It's the same story in North Cyprus too - while there are some signs (like for Larnaca in Famagusta), most new signs just point to the 'gate' and not the cities. It's especially strange in North Nicosia, where you'd expect to see signs for South Nicosia, yet there are none.

There's also no standard for signing the English names in North Cyprus - sometimes just Girne, other times Girne - Kyrenia.
I found Ammochostos signposted in Deryneia, but don't remember any reference to it before getting that close, nor on the motorway.

Took this photo en route to the control point before crossing (on foot) into the North:

 

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I read that the road numbering system was introduced in 2013. Does anyone has a (full) route list or an official map?
source (outdated D level numbers, but useful of the district level numbers) : This Link
Another source (overall map) this Link

This is what the D level roads are, based on the evidence i gathered that is pics posted by others online

D.100 from the PDF = D.10 irl
D.200 = D.20 irl
D.300 = D.30 irl

D.550 = D.05 irl
D.575 = D.15 irl
D.650 = D.25 irl
D.750 = D.35 irl
D.850 = D.45 irl
D.925 = i don;t know, if someone finds out, please let me know
D.950 = D.55 irl
 
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