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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am a regular cyclist and I am constantly disappointed by the bitty and second rate provision for cyclists in this country.

Particularly in London where we make up around a 1/4 to a 1/2 of peak traffic flows but apparently becuase transport planners count a cycle as 0.2 of a car with a single occupant, the cost benefit calculation is never as good as yet another wheeze like 'smooth the flow" which like all the others will fail. Outside London few towns and cities seem to treat cycling as a strategic utility transport option.

I drive too and I am not "anti car" (so pls no comments about "road tax" from people who obviously think that council tax is still called "window tax" and spend so much time looking for cyclist jumping red lights and riding on the pavement that they [nearly] mow down any on the actual road).

Surely transport policy should be based on efficiency of getting around and providing more space for motor traffic in historic towns ruins the appeal of the places and is the equivalent of curing high cholestorol levels by making peoples arteries wider rather than giving them drugs that cure the condition. Infrastructure for utility cyclists is relatively cheap compared to trying to make more space for cars and can actually get our towns and cities moving and make them nice places to be once again. In London I can cycle from Kings Cross to Westminster [and stop at traffic lights] in 15 to 20mins, by taxi - 40mins, by bus [forget it] by tube about 30mins. In Kent, Home to the station by car is 20 mins by cycle 50mins so car becomes the default option (tho' for health cycle is beginning to edge that)

New roads are built on an assumption that they will generate increased prosperity - any evidence of this actually happening beyond the initial cost benefit calculation and un-tested assumptions by the DfT.

The London cycle campaign is pressing to "copenhagenize" london - surely this is a good thing?

I read recent research that suggested that small shop owners overstate how many of their customers arrive by car - shd shops where owners hold such views have to put up a sign saying "customers arriving on foot, by cycle or by public transport, are not welcome"? so we know to avoid them if we have left the car at home that day?

Shared pavements for cyclists and pedestrians - do both groups need education about respect? (I never use them if I am on a speedy cycle, hate cyclist who do not ting ting when they come up behind pedestrians but get annoyed at pedestrians not allowing space for cyclists to avoid them)

Zombie pedestrians crossing the road - make it an offence, tag them and ban from crossing any road, except at zebras and pelicans, until they pass the Green cross code?

Priority at minor road junctions on signed cycle routes - why do authorities not make cars not give way to cycles and people on foot- all the car driver has to do is operate a small lever with his foot to make up the second or two they lose by waiting while a cyclist has to look in all directions and then labour to slow down and build up speed again?

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Portsmouth has proper segregated highways with cycle underpasses under busy roads (kerb seperated from pedestrians). It works.
 

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This video might interest you. It focuses on wide roads but the channel it is from is a great resource, showing Dutch cycling in pretty much every environment. It is much better there than Copenhagen, or indeed pretty much anywhere else.
 

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I'm all for segregation from traffic, both as a cyclist and motorist.

Fortunately, in Milton Keynes we have the benefit of the Redway Network, shared use paths throughout the city that following pleasant landscaping alongside grid roads, use quiet streets through estates (suburbs), enabling vunerable (young, elderly, novice) groups to enjoy 'everyday' utility cycling.

Take provision and funding away from local authorities (most of whom don't have an absolute clue!!), and re-establish Cycling England, with national funding targeting youth/university cities would be the best start.

It is like all these separate train companies all having separate bike hire schemes - you need a NATIONAL scheme in order for people to recognise and trust it, otherwise you are pissing in the wind to get recognition.
 

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There is a cycle route in Wolverhampton with underpasses grade segregated and again with a curb against pedestrians. Unfortunately along the way there are stupid gates and slaloms to get through, presumably to stop motorbikes although they can get in anyway as roads front it!


cyclestreets.net

It's very well used however. It runs from Pendeford Business Park to Pendeford shopping centre, and then on to Aldersley High School.

That's about it though... besides several miles of bike paths on either pavement or roads that people park on both of.



It's nicely done but it's usefulness is questionable. A good model for future developments though.
 

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Sciurius Regalis
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Take provision and funding away from local authorities (most of whom don't have an absolute clue!!), and re-establish Cycling England, with national funding targeting youth/university cities would be the best start.
You mean something like SUSTRANS which exists already across the UK?

We have them, British Cycling, Scottish Cycling (which are near enough the same thing) plus loads of other quango and NG groups all campaigning for similar things.

What needs to be done is to merge and combine resources IMO, not all are suitable for this of course (BC and SC are primarily sport orientated and should remain as such) but it would be a start.
 

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You mean something like SUSTRANS which exists already across the UK?

We have them, British Cycling, Scottish Cycling (which are near enough the same thing) plus loads of other quango and NG groups all campaigning for similar things.

What needs to be done is to merge and combine resources IMO, not all are suitable for this of course (BC and SC are primarily sport orientated and should remain as such) but it would be a start.
I am a member of Sustrans. British Cycling, Scottish Cycling et al. promote cycling as sport/leisure activity, not as a utility mode of everyday transport.

Instead of LA's outbidding each other in some daft misguided DfT-inspired Local Sustainable Transport Fund (or whatever name they fancy this week/month/year) give the pot to a central funder, with national standards.

Its a joke that the 'National Cycle Network' around these parts is unlit or unbuilt in place. the 'national' standard should be the HIGHEST standard, ie smooth surface, well lit, signposted, direct routing, priority junctions, not the shared-use, wibbly-wobbly via every detour and lamp-post in Nowhereshire that looks 'comprehensive' on some pretty map on a LA Cycling Officers wall.
 

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Map of the Milton Keynes Redway network already mentioned by link_road_17/7: http://www.mkweb.co.uk/cycling/documents/MK_Redway_Map.pdf

Fully grade separated from major roads and shared with pedestrians, used by leisure cyclists and commuters alike. The map is rather out of date but it shows how complete the system's coverage is.
 

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Glasgow has something in the works called 'Connect2'. It will link Central Station with Kelvingrove Park (and Glasgow University) with completely segregated cycleways. There's already a good section of segregated cycleway in place, which looks very good. :)

This now means I can get on the EK Line train with my bike, get off at Central, and have a nice incident free cycle through the city on the way to University. Can't wait till it's up and running.
 

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Some scenes from the Liverpool Loop Country Park - a pedestrian and cycle route from Hunts Cross in the south of the city to Aintree in the north:

The route starts near to Hunts Cross Merseyrail station and occupies the trackbed of the former Cheshire Lines Committee railway that was built as a freight line to the North Docks and also provided a passenger service to the eastern of the city.

This photo sequence starts some way along the route at Childwall:



As you can see, the cycle route extends from Speke in the south all the way to Southport, although this involves sections on road:



A typical scene in the south part of the route, which is surfaced throughout:



One of several tunnels on the route, although all are under roads rather than natural features. This one has been strengthened since the rail route closed:



The scene at Broadgreen where the route passes under the M62 flyover and the Liverpool and Manchester Railway:



A former rail tunnel:



This section of route at Knotty Ash is the only part where the rail route has been built over - for a supermarket access road - the cycle route continues alongside it:



The rail company obviously intended to widen the line to four tracks as these two arch bridges show:



A cutting on the approach to West Derby:



West Derby Station, the only recognisable station on the line with its platforms still partly intact. There have been plans over the years to reopen the line as a Loop Line for the city but no firm proposals for a long time:



Another double span bridge:



The most impressive items of infrastructure on the line are these girder bridges built to take the railway over dual carriageway roads. This one is at Walton Hall Avenue:


The road on the left follows the trackbed of the south side of the Walton railway triangle and used to run to Kirkdale and the city centre. The cycle route continues to the right:



A quite bucolic stretch through Walton:



Leads though to this rather forbidding tunnel:



An underbridge toward the end of the main route. The route ends officially at Seeds Lane near Aintree but, if you want to go on to Southport, you get off earlier onto the road system. Beyond Seeds Lane the route gives way to undergrowth:



Near the end of the route and the stands of Aintree Racecourse can be seen in the distance:

 

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Sciurius Regalis
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Glasgow has something in the works called 'Connect2'. It will link Central Station with Kelvingrove Park (and Glasgow University) with completely segregated cycleways. There's already a good section of segregated cycleway in place, which looks very good. :)

This now means I can get on the EK Line train with my bike, get off at Central, and have a nice incident free cycle through the city on the way to University. Can't wait till it's up and running.
Read the article again, by their description the new EERR cycle route is "segregated" which in GCC speak means a pretty green stripe along the pavement. Nowhere in the press bumf does the word 'completely' feature.

If you think you'll be able to cycle the length of it "incident free", especially over the Bridge to Nowhere then you're going to be very disappointed.

It'll be the same GCC crap as always: a half job bodged.
 

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I am a member of Sustrans. British Cycling, Scottish Cycling et al. promote cycling as sport/leisure activity, not as a utility mode of everyday transport.

Instead of LA's outbidding each other in some daft misguided DfT-inspired Local Sustainable Transport Fund (or whatever name they fancy this week/month/year) give the pot to a central funder, with national standards.

Its a joke that the 'National Cycle Network' around these parts is unlit or unbuilt in place. the 'national' standard should be the HIGHEST standard, ie smooth surface, well lit, signposted, direct routing, priority junctions, not the shared-use, wibbly-wobbly via every detour and lamp-post in Nowhereshire that looks 'comprehensive' on some pretty map on a LA Cycling Officers wall.
The problem with that is you've separated cycling from other transport modes so integration because difficult, not to mention funding becomes dependent upon transfers. More importantly, roads are managed by local authorities and transport bodies so that adds another layer of bureaucracy, whilst they're also best placed to know their locality than a national group. At least councils don't need to refer to anyone most of the time if they decide to attach a cycling lane to a local road. A national quango cannot do that.

The best bet would be transport bodies like Tfl and TfGM controlling and building city-wide cycling networks, since they have their own revenues and manage some roads, working with LAs on others.
 

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Read the article again, by their description the new EERR cycle route is "segregated" which in GCC speak means a pretty green stripe along the pavement. Nowhere in the press bumf does the word 'completely' feature.

If you think you'll be able to cycle the length of it "incident free", especially over the Bridge to Nowhere then you're going to be very disappointed.

It'll be the same GCC crap as always: a half job bodged.
Is it not ones with the kerbs between the cycle lane and the road? Copenhagen lanes, there are some already between the park and the bridge.
 

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Preston has just completed the 21 mile long Guild Wheel cycling route as the signature project for the 2012 Preston Guild celebrations. It skirts the edge of the city district, forming a complete loop which goes through the city centre at Avenham and Miller parks:
 

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Reposted from the Skybar for the slightly different audience here.

Went cycling on London's roads for the first time today and already managed to almost kill myself twice. :nuts:

Hired a bike from a place at Gabriel's Wharf on the South Bank near Waterloo. Cycled to Albert Memorial via Lambeth and Horseferry. Went on a detour in Pimlico as the result of a wrong turn.



On the way back went via Parliament Square.



All in all it was a great day, though the cycling environment really is a bit shit and I say cycling in London really isn't for the faint hearted. There are just too few places in London where it's practical to install segregated cycle infrastructure. Some roads have cycle lanes painted on the side, but changing lanes at junctions through other traffic can be a bit hair raising, and a lot of marked cycle lanes are plain deceptive as the widths are just not sufficient. Cycling in traffic also means you are always behind an exhaust pipe. Would definitely do it again for recreation though.
 
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