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Discussion Starter · #1 ·




The Icelandic Road Administration is planning the construction of a new possible bicycle route between Keflavik Airport and Reykjavik.

The route that was mapped out mostly follows old Keflavik Vatnsleysa Way and Strand Road. The route that was mapped out is 54 km long,
4 km-which is longer than the shorter driving distance
between the same locations.

Approximately 34 km of this route are paved and 16 km are gravel roads, therefore differ about 4 km of new paths need to be constructed.

The cost of constructing 4 km of new paths, paving the existing gravel roads, laying road surface marking and street signs is around 330 million USD.
A 100% recycled asphalt is used
in the cost Estimates-which is half the cost of new asphalt.

A marked bicycle route from Keflavik airport to Reykjavik could get a so called Euro Velo Certification.
Now the Icelandic Road Administration has signed agreements of cooperation with Several municipalities Regarding construction of new bicycle paths.
 

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Interesting initiative. I am wondering though if there will be much bicycle traffic between Keflavik and Reykjavik.
 

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Interestic thread!
I wonder how is it with cycling in Iceland? I've heard that most of the people there do have a car, is it even possible to NOT have it and use just your feet, bike and a public transportation?
 

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It is 50 km, so it would take you more than 2 to 3 hours, because 16 km is gravel and not paved. In freezing winter could it be quite dangerous if you are not dressed properly. Iceland doesn't have any trains, but a nice bus network in Reykjavik and irregular bus services to the other towns (few times a day). If it is possible to live without car depends mostly on your goals in live.
 

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According to the latest survey by the Land Council, this year more than 8% of the population traveled by bike in the summer, compared to only 5% in 2010 and 2% in 2008. Cycling has substantially become more popular in Iceland.
There is probably a big difference between summer and winter with biking being less popular in winter but the change in attitude towards commuting by bike has been pretty profound in the last few years. The infrastructure has improved as well but the quality is obviously nothing like what more bike friendly nations like Denmark and the Netherlands are used to. I am just hoping that city authorities and the national highway administration get smarter about the infrastructure they build when it comes to bikes. There is a risk in a country where few engineers and designers have any experience with these matters that they don't build according to current best practices and instead go with something that the Dutch and Danes were doing many years ago and that the belief is that building something is always better than building nothing. There are recent examples of this in Reykjavík where money has spent on bike infrastructure that people don't end up using very much because it is so poorly designed. This only hurts the public perception of cycling.
 

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The cost of constructing 4 km of new paths, paving the existing gravel roads, laying road surface marking and street signs is around 330 million USD.
A 100% recycled asphalt is used
in the cost Estimates-which is half the cost of new asphalt.
Isn't 330 mi USD a too high cost? :?
 

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Just one, oke 2 tips (from Amsterdam ;)), place infrared heaters @traffic lights & 'warm up' stations in windier parts of Reykjavik & other towns.

If public transit should gain popularity and expand, make it bike(rs)/cyclist-friendly.
That would be pretty nice. Are there infrared heaters like that in Amsterdam?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hofsvallagata, Reykjavik- a bicyclefriendly street

Reykjavik is a carcentric city, but the road administration wants to improve conditions for bicyclists
by giving them more space on the city streets.

Hofsvallagata, Reykjavik is a street that has been narrowed for cars in order to increase the safety
of road users and enliven the streetscape, the result is well appreciated by both the city council and residents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Golden Circle Challenge - Bicycle Race

The Golden Circle Challenge is an annual cycling competition held in Iceland.

This year's competition took place 2 days ago.

There are 3 routes to suit both professional riders and beginners alike. The rides all start and finish at lake Laugarvatn

Many have taken their first steps in the Silver cycle where the length and difficulty of the route is tailored to accommodate beginner and intermediate cyclists.

All cyclists wear a timing chip, registering their individual time.

Gold: 106km Silver: 60km Bronze: 48km

 
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