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MURRAY & ROBERTS BUILDINGS PROGRESSES WITH CONSTRUCTION OF DAINFERN SQUARE
Published on August 27, 2014

Main contractor Murray & Roberts Buildings is making good progress on the new Dainfern Square Shopping Centre, north of Johannesburg, being developed by Abacus Asset Management. This upmarket mixed-use retail development on the corner of William Nicol Drive and Broadacres Drive is expected to start trading from April 2015, with a number of national retailer anchor tenants joining other South African chain stores, together with banks, restaurants and original local shops. Above the ground floor, the retail section on Level 1 of the development features lettable offices and an upmarket gym.

Although there will be surface parking on the ground level, the bulk of shoppers’ vehicles will be accommodated on two levels of super-basement parking, with a total of 1246 parking bays serving the shopping centre.

The development is formed around the perimeter of the site creating a unique arrival experience into its centre, giving access to internal and external retail blocks, as well as the restaurant and dining areas. The retail and office blocks are separated by large roof lights creating covered walkways, which give access to an external mall to the north and a covered mall to the east. The walkways are all interlinked to create a modern village feel that makes for a relaxed shopping experience and work environment. The development will be characterised by the use of polished concrete floor finishes and decorative concrete in other areas.

The Dainfern Square contract is part of a three-development package awarded to Murray & Roberts Buildings by Abacus, the other two projects being the Matlosana Mall in Klerksdorp, which opens its doors in October 2014, and Bay West in Port Elizabeth, scheduled to begin trading in March 2015.

Construction work on the Dainfern Square development commenced in September 2013 with the establishment of the two parking basements. This was followed by casting of the decks for the ground floor and roof erection is beginning in August this year. Being constructed on a site approximately 60 000 m2 in size, the footprint of the structure is 52 000 m2, with a gross lettable area comprising 14 952 m2 of retail space and 7 835 m2 of offices and gym in Phase 1.

Fanie Stadler, Murray & Roberts Buildings’ contracts manager, says one of the biggest challenges on this project has been the lack of power supply to the site until July 2014, which required significant use of generators. Also challenging has been the roadworks taking place along William Nicol (R511) in the Dainfern area, which poses a major constraint to timeous delivery of construction materials that is likely to continue throughout the duration of the project. In mitigation, the concrete mix has been adjusted to enable sufficient workability after the extended travel time. Concrete pours are also being scheduled very early in the mornings or on weekends.

At project peak there will be more than 700 personnel on site. The Murray & Roberts Buildings team is mentoring two emerging contractors who are doing bricklaying, as part of the Murray & Roberts Enterprise Development Programme. Site labour is being recruited through a black women-owned company that employs labour from the local community.

A stringent safety programme has ensured zero Lost Time Injury hours to date. The programme, based on the Murray & Roberts Group STOP.THINK.ACT 24/7 safety philosophy, involves daily safety inductions and mass toolbox talks, as well as competitions for best safety supervisor on site and best safety performance by a labourer, which take place a month by month basis.

On the environmental side, owing to the proximity of residential complexes, the key issues requiring special management are dust and noise. To mitigate the effects of noise from the construction site on the neighbouring residential complexes, shifts are presently running from 6 am to 6 pm.

Source: Leading Architecture































Images: dhk Architects
 

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Blegh

Northern suburbs. Yuck
Agree! :eek:hno:

Note the 1. fake outside shopping district effect.
2. Car dominated design
3. Emphasis on security (boom is quite dominant in render)
4. Building is completely fenced off and blocked from street.

Clearly rubbish! South African cities need to really move away from this crap!
 

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When are developer and consumers going to move away from eating at restaurants here:



To prefering to eating at restaurants over here:



Ok, yes, I know that the bottom picture is in Cape Town. But South Africans (or middle and upper class ones) must really move back to interacting and participating in the real urban city. Screw disneyworld!
 

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yip Im going to drive from Northern Fourways to Joburg to go for dinner. Seriously ? this is a convenience retail and entertainment environment serving a distant part of the city, how can it be wrong? you guys need to regurgitate your urban fantasy text books and deal with real life traffic and convince and see these for what they are.

Clearing serving a need and what people want, **** the utopian mythical urban planning you talk about as its not gonna happen, clearly majority rules and people want this sort of convenience or it wouldn't get built. So people want it but you want them to change for you and your narrow definition of whats acceptable

The city and its user base still use it so whats wrong with an semi urban environment. Not everything can be about the city or you wouldn't have century city, Claremont, bellville or Parklands. they exist for a reason so stop bleating at every post about development thats not Capetown CBD centric
 

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yip Im going to drive from Northern Fourways to Joburg to go for dinner. Seriously ? this is a convenience retail and entertainment environment serving a distant part of the city, how can it be wrong? you guys need to regurgitate your urban fantasy text books and deal with real life traffic and convince and see these for what they are.

Clearing serving a need and what people want, **** the utopian mythical urban planning you talk about as its not gonna happen, clearly majority rules and people want this sort of convenience or it wouldn't get built. So people want it but you want them to change for you and your narrow definition of whats acceptable

The city and its user base still use it so whats wrong with an semi urban environment. Not everything can be about the city or you wouldn't have century city, Claremont, bellville or Parklands. they exist for a reason so stop bleating at every post about development thats not Capetown CBD centric
I agree with t he point that you make. However, convenient developments do not always offer long-term benefits. However, it is not as if every restaurant and shop in Johannesburg is in a mall. Johannesburg has amazing streetlife. Fourways still sucks, imo.
 

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of course they offer long term benefits. Economic = +-R500mil, plus massive increase in rates base for city which enables services to be provided. Loads of new business that dident exist before. Road upgrades which benefit everyone . social= employment both temp during construction and permanent to diepsloot residents i.e. close so more local spend.

again guys why you all fight market forces, if this is not warranted then feso would not stack and no bank would loan against it. CLEARLY there is a need and convenience is what life is about.

Yes Fourways is a tip BUT it serves a need for a massive middle class which is its customer base who would otherwise have to go elsewhere and add more traffic to roads .

don't fight suburban sprawl, its a sign of progress and has its natural limits. Fourways is an important commercial centre, casino, banks, retail, education, medical, entertainment and office blocks so its a small town on the ends of joburg and serves a purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We need to bear in mind that not everyone likes the idea of staying in the city centre. The majority want a freestanding home in the suburbs with a garden where their children can play, they can keep pets etc. Economics and changing mindsets will eventually result in more people seeking the downtown cosmopolitan vibe that many of us enjoy, but developments such as these are never going to go away in their entirety.

Personally, I don't think that this particularly development is half bad. It looks well-designed architecturally, it's not inward-focussed but rather gets shoppers out into the sun a bit, the pedestrian isn't completely ignored (as I felt was the case with the likes of Nicolway Bryanston) and it's providing jobs to the local community. We could do much, much worse (and have!).
 

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I think Densification is a good thing, but densification and centralising a city is two different things. The American's learnt it the hard way. Having a central business district in the centre of the city is actually the worst urban design methodology. Having urban nodes is the way to go. otherwise traffic is flowing at one direction at a point in time and the other direction at another point in time. That part of the northern suburb is quite dense compared to other part of Joburg (the inner ring). I think using the urban node of cities (Sandton, Rosebank, Midrand, Fourways, Randburg, Lanseria etc.) is a good strategy so that traffic will be busy on both directions during rush hour.
 
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